June 21, 2021

1804 Part 2: The Duel in Weehawken

1804 Part 2: The Duel in Weehawken

Welcome to part two of our coverage on Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the infamous duel in Weehawken! Stick around after the death of Aaron Burr to hear a bonus section on someone who, in the gals' opinion, is the unsung hero of the story. Of course, the gals can't waste an opportunity to reference Hamilton in this episode. How many did you hear? 

In this episode the ONUC gals discuss the life of Aaron Burr from being orphaned at infancy, to being a war hero, and eventually being arrested for treason. This week we will discuss the infamous duel in Weehawken in detail and what led to the death of Alexander Hamilton. Were there two shots fired or just one? Who shot first? (Kayla obviously has strong opinions.)

Trigger Warning Level: None (Yay!)
There is some in depth discussion regarding bullet wounds and anatomy but nothing graphic in nature.


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Sources: Biography.com, Encyclopedia Britannica, and Encyclopedia of Alabama 

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Transcript

You are listening to one nation under crime, a chronological true crime podcast. Each week, we go through our nation's history and discuss one case from each year, unless it's this episode where it's a continuation of the previous year part two, but we start in 1800. I am Kayla and I'm Leah. And this week we are wrapping up 1804 with part two of Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr. And finally, we will get to the Dolan Weehawken. So a sources for this week, kind of the same exact ones as last week, guys, real big shock. 

0  

00:00:40

So Wikipedia biography.com, Britannica encyclopedia. Those are the main ones that I use. There is a good book that I actually have sitting over here and it's called duel by Thomas Fleming. And it goes through, it actually compares both of the lives of Burr and Hamilton as it goes through their lives. So if you wanted further reading on that last week, we went through the events that occurred in 1804 and the life of Alexander Hamilton. So now we're taking a total 180 and looking at the man who ended it all Aaron Burr. 

0  

00:01:21

Yes. Do you want to make it clear again that while I love Hamilton and American musical, it is entitled Hamilton and therefore from the point of view of Alexander Hamilton. So if you don't know much about Ehrenberg, I mean, prepare to be impressed cause he had his own accomplishments and life and his fair share of shady dealings such as being arrested for Treyson. Yeah. Well, so February 6th, 1756, Aaron Bird Jr. Is born in Newark, New Jersey as the second child to Reverend Aaron Burr's senior and Esther Edwards birth July 11th, 1804 burst shoots Hamilton in a duel. 

0  

00:02:11

And we hearken, which killed Hamilton and metaphorically ended Burr as well. Yep. September 14th, 1836 bird died in a boarding house and Staten island after having an immobilizing stroke two years earlier, so much like Hamilton Ehrenberg Jr. Had a bit of a rough upbringing, we'll say one year after his birth, his father, Aaron Burr's senior died while he was the president of Princeton and Burr's grandfather on his mother's side, Jonathan Edwards took over the position at Princeton for his late son-in-law and then he moved in with the family. 

0  

00:03:00

So he took over as president Princeton, after Ehrenberg senior died, he just took over everything that senior did. Like he was the head of the family, everything. Yeah, until a year later and 1758 Edwards, the grandfather died and Burr's mother and grandmother also died in the same year. Ooh, Burr and his sister were orphaned when he was only too sad. The children were taken in by their maternal uncle, Timothy Edwards and Burr attempted many times to run away due to physical abuse from his uncle. 

0  

00:03:44

But Burr was only 13 when he was accepted as a sophomore to Princeton. Wow. And then at 16, he graduated with a bachelor of arts, but continued to study theology for another year. His grandfather, the one that took over for his dad at Princeton was a widely known theologian. And so it's kind of sad that maybe he was trying to go in his footsteps right. Of studying theology. But Byrd decided after that he was going to do intense theology studies under Joseph Bellamy, but two years into it, he decided he needed a career change that wasn't for him. 

0  

00:04:29

Yeah. And when he was 19, he moved to Connecticut and studied law with his brother-in-law. So his sister's husband and studied law. But when Burr heard about Lexington and Concord in 1775, he put his law aspirations on hold and joined the continental army bur then fought under Benedict Arnold and Quebec and, and Arnold commented on Burr's great spirit and resolution because of this Burr was sent where he was a captain under general Montgomery until he caught a bullet in the neck and Quebec. 

0  

00:05:13

So during the battle of Quebec in 1775, you know, general Montgomery was killed and Burr actually attempted to recover Montgomery's body. Once the battle was over it's undetermined, whether he was successful, I couldn't find, I didn't see anything where it said for sure, Burr had a stepbrother who, which I don't know how that works. Yeah. It says he has a stepbrother. So it could have been because he was taken in by his uncle. Maybe they, yeah. Yeah. So his stepbrother helped him get a position on George Washington staff in the spring of 1776, but on June 26 important date in history case, anybody was wondering six to six, my birthday, the day of my birth, clearly back then, it was very important as well. 

0  

00:06:12

Everyone knew about it, but on June 26th, he quit to be on the battlefield. He went on to save an entire brigade who was going to be captured once they landed in man, like once the British came and landed in Manhattan, there was an entire group of men who were going to be captured and Burr kind of found out about it ahead of time. And he went down there and like saved them and got them out. So he's a war hero too. He is. So at this time, Israel, Putnam was Berge general. And while Putnam lifted Burr up as a hero, the next day when George Washington's general orders came out, Burr's actions were not mentioned. 

0  

00:07:04

So Burr was in the you're reiterated that he was not mentioned because while the nation all thought that Burr was a hero, the best way to receive a promotion in the military at that time was through reports in Washington general orders. So it's kind of like if you were named in this report then like it's kind of widely known that you, Hey, you're important and we should kind of lift you up, but you're kind of on the radar. Yeah. And they didn't, they weren't in Washington, his general orders, which I'm not a hundred percent sure. 

0  

00:07:45

I don't remember the timeline of dates, but it could have been in this time. Cause I wonder that too. It could have been in this time that Hamilton was writing the Washington general orders, you know, I'm not sure. I don't, I'm not sure whether the years of the timelines match up, but I just thought about that. This might've also been where a riff between Burr and Washington started. Yeah. You know, it's not known for sure. Cause there were other things that could have happened, but Byrd continued to follow Washington's orders during the war out of respect for his fellow soldiers. 

0  

00:08:28

But it was not without a chip on his shoulder. However that did not prevent are wonderful, wonderful Aaron Burr from falling in love on the battlefield. Oh, in 1776, Burr was responsible for protecting 14 year old Margaret Moncrief, the daughter of Staten island based British major Thomas Moncrief ber at the time was 20. 

0  

00:09:11

She was 14. Okay. Just going to make sure that that's clear. So Margaret somehow ended up behind enemy lines and Manhattan and Washington promised major Moncrief that his daughter would be safely returned to him, which, I mean, it's kind of a lie. Like he didn't have to do that. He didn't have to, you know, decide to protect her till a wrench was thrown into the plan. And Margaret was refusing to go back because her and Burr were in love very much in love with one another that probably made Washington not so happy. 

0  

00:09:52

So they tried to make it to where she could stay on that side didn't happen. And there was no way that Washington was keeping Margaret on their side during the war. And Moncrief was not letting his daughter stay with Patriots. Yeah. So the lovers were unfortunately split apart and Burr moved on or teen that remember that time, it was not unusual for a 14 year old girl. Their very worst. I'm just saying that's that's too much for me. 

0  

00:10:35

I can't even, even with my grandparents, you know, young, young, I can't anyway. I mean, I can't imagine it, but so after this Burr was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel in 1777 for Malcolm's additional continental regimen, Colonel William Malcolm was called away from his regimen frequently. And that left bur in charge of roughly 300 men at any given time kind of important. So the regiment was successful in warding off many nighttime raids that were focused kind of on central New Jersey. 

0  

00:11:26

And they also stopped the British who tried to attack by water. The battle of Monmouth took out a lot of the regiment just due to British fire. And ber actually had a heat stroke during this battle. Burr was then reassigned to Malcolm's regiment. So he moved from the additional regiment to just the regimen. So maybe the more important one I suppose, and this is a big step up for Burr and this new regiment he was over, he was significantly under the command now instead of, you know, Colonel Malcolm, he was now under general Alexander McDougle, who was very prominent and influential in the revolutionary war, very famous general in that time. 

0  

00:12:17

But it was not long after in March of 1779, a Burr had to resign from the continental army altogether because his health just hadn't recovered from him. Having a heat stroke. Burt went back to studying law and he was no longer affiliated with the army, but he did still help when he was needed. And he did a lot of intelligence and reconnaissance missions kind of on the outside for George Washington, George Washington, what kind of call on him. And he would, you know, go behind it and be lines per se and, and get some information. 

0  

00:12:56

Theodosia Bartow Prevost came into Burr's life in 1778. She was married to Jacques Marcus provost at the time who was on the British side in Georgia, trying to keep the colonies in line Theodosia was in New Jersey. And Burr was keeping her bed warm while her husband was away. So they say she was 10 years older than Burr. And we went from really young to, oh yeah. 

0  

00:13:36

He went in the opposite direction and then don't worry because later he goes in the opposite direction. It's it's crazy. And each time the gap just gets bigger. It's a schist. Sorry. Okay. So she was 10 years older than Burr and with Burr leaving the <em></em> house at all times of the day and night rumors started as they do. Yes. The two were then openly a couple in 1780 and Theodosius husband died in 1781 in Jamaica from wounds that he had suffered during the war previously. 

0  

00:14:17

So it wasn't Williams that he suffered in Jamaica. It was previously, you know, done that then just kind of spilled over, I guess, to later in life kind of, kind of like a lot of these people do, but yeah. So yeah, they were definitely in a relationship for a firm. So 1778 was when they met. So then 1780 was when they were open. Right. So two years and then 81 is when her husband dies. So four years, yes. For years, the new couple married in 1782 and welcomed their daughter Theodosia in 1783. 

0  

00:15:03

Unfortunately Burr's wife was sick for several years. She could have had stomach or uterine cancer, but it's unknown because that wasn't, she was very, very sick and based off of all of the reports and everything that I've seen for that time, you know, she, they think that based off of the symptoms, that's likely what it would have been. So she passed away in 1794 when her daughter would have been 11 years old. Okay. Parents dying and leaving Kia. It's it's, it's a lot. So in the same year of his nuptials Burr passed the bar and started practicing law when the British finally took off and left Manhattan. 

0  

00:15:55

Cause it took them a few years in case people don't know. So even though that the war was over, the British were still occupying New York at the time and they, cause that's kind of where they set up station. Like we said before, in the previous episode when Kings college closed, it was because the British had taken over New York city. Right. And it's because it was, it was Manhattan. It was the best direct line from great Britain to the U S cause it was right there, you know, kind of on the coast. And so it w it was closer, you know, than, than Boston or anything like that. So for a lot of this time, even though the war was over, the British were still there. 

0  

00:16:36

And so it was kind of this weird in between time where like who's in charge, is it the Patriots or the British, because the British are still here and they're not leaving. And actually it was George Washington who came back to New York and like ran them out. Okay, get out. Here you go. So when all that happened, Burr passed the bar and he started practicing law. He served on the New York assembly and fought to have slavery abolish, right? When the war officially ended, he did not make it for at the time. This is a new nation. It was not really, it wasn't really a time to go ahead and start, like making big, big changes and especially economical changes. 

0  

00:17:24

And while slavery is atrocious, we, we discussed that in episode three. We're not, we're not fans not saying that it should be a thing. This was just it. I feel as though he could have waited a little bit longer for a better time and maybe it would have been more received. And at that time it's just kind of one of those things like too soon, but also you have a lot of the men who are in charge who were slave owners like Thomas Jefferson. Yeah. I mean, unfortunately, so, you know, I, while it's admirable, what he tried to do at that time, it's just kind of like, it was a little soon guy, like will soon. 

0  

00:18:10

So Burr went on to become the attorney general of New York state and then beat Phillip Schuyler for his seat in the legislature and became a Senator. So he's moving up the ladder, he's getting there quick and he's got ambition. Yeah. He does have ambition. And he's kind of getting there any way he can, because keep in mind he took Phillip Skyler's seat and they were not the same political party, which is not how that works. Nope. Nope. So Burr basically wormed his way in to his seat by kind of deceiving people as to what his political party was. 

0  

00:18:59

He kind of just saw an opportunity and took it so not, not great. So burrow was prominent in politics in New York and he ran for president in 1796, but he came in dead last for somebody. Somebody has to, I mean, I guess three years later, he dueled John Barker church Angelica's husband, because church said that Burr had taken bribes for his political position. Oh yeah. So it was kind of at the time Burr was making such giant leaps in politics and in this new climate that people started going, why are you getting there so fast? 

0  

00:19:51

And so, yeah, so, and which, if you remember too, John Church was also the name of one of Alexander his children. So yeah. That's where the name John Church came from, because it sounds weird when you're reading Alexander Hamilton's kids' names. Cause it's like John chart, that's a name, that's not, his name was John Church. And he was named after his uncle. Yes. So either way, both men shot and missed each other and afterward church actually apologized to Bern and said that he shouldn't have accused Burr without proof. Interesting. 

0  

00:20:31

Which is interesting. It is interesting because you know, if you know anything really about duals in that time, there's, which, and I should have included this in here and I meant to, and I don't know why I didn't, but so in this time duals were very, how would you say it? They're very structured. Yes. 

1  

00:20:54

There's a, there's definitely a code of conduct for them. They are 10 duel commandments. 

0  

00:20:59

Yes. And so, yeah. And if you listen to Hamilton, there's, they, they go through the Tyndall commandments, which, you know, 

1  

00:21:06

It simplifies, but lays out how structured it is. 

0  

00:21:10

So it's like you have to come forward and, you know, kind of basically you have to bring your seconds in and they have to what's your second is kinda like your friend, your friend that you brought with you kind of just your buddy, 

1  

00:21:35

Your backup, your hot 

0  

00:21:36

Man. Right. And so at that time, you know, you would bring in your second and then they would be the ones that would go forward to the other second and say, Hey, can we come to an agreement? Yes, no, maybe. So I compromise a little here and you know, then from there, if you could compromise, you could, you know, move forward from that. Then 

1  

00:22:04

Nobody had to shoot. It would 

0  

00:22:06

Be over. It'd be done. So unfortunately in a lot of cases that did not happen or if it did There still might've been some fighting, well 

1  

00:22:22

Gets to the point of an actual duel. Usually you don't have a cool head and your emotions are very much tied into it. And there's the element of your honor, your pride, your, you know, your honor eyes, samely name and, you know, you can't be seen as less than, 

0  

00:22:40

Oh, that reminds me of is like an old time, like older times when like men would walk up to other men and like slap them in the face with their gloves, 

1  

00:22:51

Like throwing the gauntlet. It's like, 

0  

00:22:55

I can just see bird and he's like dishonor on you, dishonor. And then like, 

1  

00:23:03

We also love Disney. 

0  

00:23:04

Yeah. So I can totally see how you know, in, in, in this it's very interesting, but yes. So you have to bring a doctor, you have to bring your second with you. You have to, at the beginning of the duel, count off 10 steps, either way, kind of the men start back to back, then take 10 steps and turn around then everyone else, which we'll talk about kind of more about this in a bit, but everyone else has to turn around with their back to the duel to so they can have deniability. And then you basically shoot at each other. And from there you decide whether you're going to Dillo hope, which talked about in the last episode where you either shoot in the scar or you shoot at the ground to just basically that saying, I'm not backing down from the dual, but I'm also not going to shoot you. 

0  

00:23:59

It's kind of a way of like, we're not going to agree and we're not going to come to an understanding. So we kind of have to go forward with it, but I don't want to kill it, but I don't want to kill you, which makes no sense to me. So then just move on. It's a 

1  

00:24:13

Whole, 

0  

00:24:15

Just take a glove and slap the other rant with it and be done with it. Or, 

1  

00:24:19

And my mother always, like I talked about my mom before she is, she is very even, even keel wonderful pleasant lady, but she, she has always wanted to slap somebody in the face with the fish, which is, 

0  

00:24:35

It's so funny to me, that would be amazing. I mean, 

1  

00:24:39

I think it'd be got a satisfying, but she, she just that's something she wants to do. She wants to do that and to ride on an elephant behind his ears, like Knight had to sit on a little cage on his back, actually like behind his ears. Those are her two bucket lists. 

0  

00:24:53

Interesting. So there you go. I mean, I could see it slapping somebody with a fish would probably be kind of fun. I, it would be, I never thought about that, but now it's on your bucket list now it's it might be on my bucket list. Don't slap me with a fish. I won't slap you with a fish period. No, you just said, don't slap you with a fish, not say all together. So, so anyways, like we said, they, you know, church then apologized to Burr, said he shouldn't have done it without proof. And then Burr went on to start the bank of the Manhattan company, which we discussed in episode one, all this just tying together. 

0  

00:25:41

So at the time there were only two other banks in New York, but they were started by Federalists and Burr was a democratic Republican at the time. Anyways, at the time he ended up changing parties, but 

1  

00:25:57

He flip-flopped to what 

0  

00:25:59

He did, what his needs he did, what was best for him. So this kind of goes into a little bit more in detail that I didn't do in episode one. But so the banks were mainly owned by the Federalists. And so there was the federal government's bank, which was the bank of the United States. And then Hamilton's bank of New York. But burger starting, the Manhattan company did not come without sketchiness and push banks because bird decided he was going to be sketchy. So Burr asked Hamilton and other Federalists for support to start the company cause you know, eat it backing. 

0  

00:26:44

But Berger said it was to establish a water company for Manhattan. This is kind of what we discussed before with the quote where he said is the worst deal since the American revolution to happen. So he said it was going to be for a water company at the last minute, Birch changed the charter application and included that the company could invest surplus funds in any way they wanted, as long as it didn't violate state laws and it removed the water company entirely. So he was accused obviously of acting dishonorably and it delayed the water system being established in Manhattan, like by a lot and actually what he was supposed to have been doing. 

0  

00:27:33

People backed him. And at the time, which around this time when the water company was trying to be established, a really big kind of epidemic of malaria went through New York city and you know, malaria kind of comes from stagnant water and, you know, mosquitoes and things like that. So when he didn't start the water company, as he stated he was going to then, you know, it's kind of led to believe that he caused this nice epidemic night through New York, before we did discuss the election of 1800 in episode one. 

0  

00:28:25

So I'm not going to totally repeat everything here, but to sum it up, Hamilton put his support behind Jefferson instead of Burr and Burr lost Byrd did become vice-president under Jefferson, but Jefferson kind of shut Burr out of a lot of dealings because he didn't trust him. If the election of 1800 was the straw that broke the camel's back for Bern Hamilton, then the Charles Cooper letter poured gasoline onto a fire. 

0  

00:29:07

You know, it, things were already strained and you know, kind of burrow was already mad because he was getting shut out of everything. And he wanted to be in the room where it happened and it was Hamilton's fault. It all handled right. So none of his own never. So April 24th, 1804, the Albany register published a letter, which can not just say why all these newspapers publish and letters from people in between people mantra, business. That's kind of like tabloids now. I mean, think of that. I mean, they were like the original national Enquirer. It's ridiculous. I mean, all of these different things, that's just like, why, why y'all got to mess with people. 

0  

00:29:52

And only all are doing is just causing issues. But I mean, remember they didn't have television, they didn't have radio. This was how they got all the information. So sometimes you just got to stay. I mean, it's like the Maury pelvic shit, you know, miss Marie, that's a good one. So like I was saying April 24th, 1804, the Albany register published a letter. And that letter was between Charles Cooper and Phillip Schuyler, who was Hamilton's father-in-law in the letter, Cooper stated quote, general Hamilton and judge Kent have declared in substance that they looked upon Mr. 

0  

00:30:43

Burger to be a dangerous man. And one who ought to not be trusted with the reigns of government ber quickly wrote a letter to Hamilton and he was set off by the comment that he was more despicable and bird demanded a prompt and unqualified acknowledgement or denial of the use of any expression, which would warrant that assertion from Dr. Cooper, basically Hamilton, you better have a real good excuse for why this man says, you said this. 

0  

00:31:25

Yeah. You know, you're going to deny it. It's Hamilton's reply. Did I stood? It did eyes. Yeah. It's a God. I love him. So again, pride, pride, pride, pride in Hamilton, Hottie fashion Hamilton replied that he could not be held responsible if Dr. Cooper misinterpreted his words, even if I said what you think, and yeah, and Hamilton never denied saying them and told Byrd that if he was not happy with the answer, then Hamilton would quote, abide the consequences. 

0  

00:32:10

Burr applied, quote, political opposition can never absolve gentlemen from the necessity of a rigid adherence to the laws of honor. And the rules of decorum Hamilton replied that quote that he had quote, no other answer to give than that, which has already been given. As I said, I mean, It's My favorite. I know. I know. It's just, it's so funny. And it, even if the, say what you think I said, 

1  

00:32:51

He would need to sign a more specific 

0  

00:32:53

Grievance. Here's an itemized list of 30 years of disagreements, sweet Jesus, which would not surprise me at all. And then if Hamilton was just like, here you go, I kept the scroll all this time. All of our, all of our bad blood between one another. So then bird challenged Hamilton to a duel and Hamilton accepted. It was July 11th, 1804. The two men rode, rode across the Hudson at Dawn and separate boats to Weehawken, which was in New Jersey. So both New Jersey and New York had outlawed dueling at this time, but they still chose to go to New Jersey because everything is legal in New Jersey, but in Rio. 

0  

00:33:43

But in reality, New Jersey was just known to not be as aggressive at prosecuting anyone who's involved in a dual. So they figured that, you know, it would be better for them to go there than for them, you know, to duel in New York and possibly be, you know, probably punted heavily for, for doing it. They were prominent members of society. Right. They were. And so, yeah, they, these, as I said in the last episode were the same dueling grounds that Philip Hamilton fought on just three years prior, the men were also using the same guns used between Phillip and George Eaker. 

0  

00:34:28

Yep. And it said that the guns belonged to Hamilton's brother-in-law, that's how they got them. So, but yeah, same spot, same silhouette. 

1  

00:34:40

Has it been the same guns that were used between the, in the duel half lane burning, 

0  

00:34:44

But I don't know if you could have owned the guns. I think that might've been part of the dual that you couldn't own the guns. They had to be someone else. So you can make sure that yeah. So you could make sure that nothing happened. Don't her with one of them. So I think they had to be owned by somebody else, but I'm not sure where they would have gotten the guns from, for that one. 

1  

00:35:08

Yeah. Everything, you know, this pretty historical pace of 

0  

00:35:11

Yeah, exactly. 

1  

00:35:13

Historical place of history 

0  

00:35:15

Artifact, right around 6:30 AM ber arrived with his quote second, which was William Peter van ness and Hamilton arrived with his second judge, Nathaniel Pendleton and Dr. David Hosek around 7:00 AM. And it was way too confusing to put in the part. But Peter van ness and Pendleton were the two that were exchanging the letters to each other to give to Hamilton and Burr. So they were kind of like the go between, between the two of them. So then they also served as their second and cause they were kind of involved, invested in this whole affair, this whole deal. 

0  

00:36:02

Right. So when they all arrived, there was another man that was there with Burr. It says he was identified as John sward out. That's how we're going to say it. Okay. And when they got there, they started to clear underbrush from the dueling ground. You know, there is speculation of who shot first and by some firsthand accounts, they say they heard two shots and others say they heard just one. So because of plausible deniability, which that's when everybody, you know, turn their backs, all of the men had their backs turned during the duals. 

0  

00:36:51

So there really isn't any way to know there's no actual accurate account because they didn't see if you are in the one-shot camp, which you should be because burger shop first, I'm just going to go ahead and sing it. I don't care what the history books said, Burr shot first. And there is, we'll discuss it further, but there is evidence that that is a very, very good possibility, even though some people say which I'll anyways, I'll go into it a second. Look, don't get ahead of yourself. I'm getting ahead of myself. So yeah, if you're in the one-shot camp, then burst shot Hamilton as Hamilton was aiming his weapon to the sky in an effort to throw the dual. If you go off of the two-shot theory, then Hamilton apparently fired a shot above Burr's head and it hit a tree either way, Burr fired and hit Hamilton in the lower abdomen, above the right hip, the bullet ricocheted off of Hamilton's ribs and a fractured rib caused considerable damage to his internal organs, particularly his liver and diaphragm. 

0  

00:37:58

And then it lodged into his lower lumbar vertebrae possibly between the first and second, according to Pendleton Hamilton collapsed almost immediately dropping the pistol and voluntarily. And then it said that Burr moved towards Hamilton in a speechless manner before being hustled away by his second Peter van ness. Oh my gosh, what I do. Yeah. They said that, you know, that he did kind of lunch forward to kind of like go to, you know him. So as I said, Dr. David Hosek was there and he was the same doctor that treated Philip Hamilton. 

0  

00:38:40

And he wrote an account of the dual and the aftermath, which I'm going to read. It is a very long quote, but it describes exactly to his recollection what happened that day. He did write it about a month after the events happened and occurred. So there could be some things that could, you know, he's trying to remember. It was kind of long situation, but he did write an account of, of the, and the aftermath. And so I'm going to read it. It's very well-written and you know, kind of in the wheel. Yeah. It goes in deeper into what happened. And I couldn't really pull parts out of it because there was so much, so I just decided, well, I'll read the whole thing when called to him upon his receiving the fatal wound. 

0  

00:39:27

I found him half sitting on the ground, supported in the arms of Mr. Pendleton, his countenance of death. I shall never forget. He had at that instant just strength to say, this is a mortal wound doctor. He then sunk away and became to all appearance lifeless. I immediately stripped up his clothes. And soon alas, I ascertained that the direction of the ball must have been through some vital part. His pulses were not to be felt his respiration was entirely suspended. 

0  

00:40:08

And upon laying my hand on his heart and perceiving no motion there, I considered him as irrecoverably gone. I however, observed to Mr. Pendleton that the only chance for his reviving was immediately to get him upon the water. We therefore lifted him up and carried him out of the wood, to the margin of the bank, where the Bargeman aided us in, conveying him into the boat, which immediately put off during all this time. I could not discover the least symptom of returning to life. I now rubbed his face lips and temples with spirits of Hartshorn, applied it to his neck and breast and to the risks and palms of his hands, the endeavor to pour some into his mouth. 

0  

00:41:00

Soon after recovering his sight, he happened to cast his eye upon the case of pistols and observing the one that he had had in his hand, lying on the outside. He said, take care of that pistol. It is often discharged and still cocked. It may go off and do harm Pendleton nose attempting to turn his head towards him. That I did not intend to fire at him. Yes. Said Mr. Understanding his wish I have already made Dr. Hosek acquainted with your determination as to that he then closed his eyes and remained calm without any disposition to speak, nor did he say much afterward, except in reply to my questions. 

0  

00:41:52

He asked me once or twice how I found his pulse. And he informed me that his lower extremities had lost all feeling manifesting to me that he entertained no hopes that he should survive. So, 

1  

00:42:08

I mean, you said that the, the bullet lodge between his vertebrae, so that would make syrup. 

0  

00:42:13

Yeah. And yeah, the Hawthorne or, or whatever, he said, it's kind of like smelling salts from what I could understand. So that was when he kind of revived him, but it's just so sad because you know, he's sitting there and he's telling them one, that's the gun that I had in my hand. It's not, he's basically saying he didn't shoot. It's still cocked and it's not discharged. So be careful when you're touching it. And then two don't 

1  

00:42:39

Accidentally shoot somebody 

0  

00:42:40

Or something. Right. And then he tells Pendleton, you know, who was his second? You know, I did not intend to fire at him. Like, please know that I never intended to shoot him. And that's when Pendleton's like, I know, you know, I know that you didn't. So which 

1  

00:43:00

Would further 

0  

00:43:01

The one shot theory. Yeah. Which, and that's why there's, there's a lot of things that make me think the one-shot theory happened. I think that the two shot theory could have been an echo coming off of the trees or something in that area. You know, when, when a shot is fired, it is very loud and it can echo off of things. So it could be that you could have, you could think maybe you heard a second, but for him to say that the gun was still cocked, he didn't shoot. 

1  

00:43:31

Yeah. The only, the only other explanation for the two shot theory to, to be, you know, because just like in the other dual, when he was shot, it could have been, you know, his, from his body hitting the ground or convulsion or, you know, something as it reacts. 

0  

00:43:50

Yeah. Yeah. But if the gun was still caught, but wasn't it, 

1  

00:43:53

I mean, he, he said that it was maybe not realizing that he had fired when assay. 

0  

00:43:58

I mean, they said, I don't know. I'm just, I just, right. I would think personally, I would think with Dr. Hosek writing this, I would think if it weren't that he would have known, he would have said that. 

1  

00:44:16

I agree. I agree. I'm just trying to, 

0  

00:44:18

Yeah. I, I, yeah. I don't find reasons. I don't quite understand. And you know, also keep in mind, the people who say there were two shots were on birth side, you said one were Hamilton side. So it could be that the people who were saying there were two shots or trying to justify, right. Why he was shot. And you know, there's really no telling as far as that goes. Unfortunately I never know. So before the duel Hamilton wrote a letter entitled statement on impending duel with Aaron Burr in this letter, he said that he intended to throw away his shot and not shoot at him. 

0  

00:45:06

Nothing. He didn't throw away his shot. I know. That's why I put that in there. He intended. Yeah. So what he intended to do was to shoot off at the ground or at the sky. And he was not going to shoot again, because in further into a duel, if you are the first one to shoot and you miss, and then they shoot, there's some kind of rule where you can then take another shot after intersect. So that's what he was saying is that he intended to throw it away and then he was not going to try and shoot him again. 

0  

00:45:46

So, and then there is evidence that Burr intended to kill Hamilton. Yeah. He's mad. He had said it on several occasions. The afternoon after the duel, he was quoted as saying that he would have shot Hamilton in the heart, had his vision not been impaired by the morning mist kind of incriminating. So when, as we know, Aaron Burr is a little flip-floppy. So he kind of goes to the, he goes way benefits, which how this benefit down on it. And we'll get into that. So Hamilton died the day after the duel, after seeing his wife, Elizabeth and their children, and in the presence of more than 20 friends and family members, he passed away. 

0  

00:46:34

Wow. He was buried in Trinity church, in Manhattan, his political ally, governor Morris gave the eulogy at his funeral and established a private fund to support Eliza and the children since he had died. And then at the same time, Burr initially fled to Philadelphia to avoid charges against him. But he was never tried for murder bur hoped to restore his reputation and political career by dueling Hamilton. But ultimately it ended all of them did the opposite. So, and side story fun fact, Leah and I have both been to Trinity church. 

0  

00:47:18

We had at different times, not together, but it's in pictures too. So we did go to Trinity church. We did see Hamilton's grave. We did see Angelica's. We did see Eliza's they are buried, you know, right. Beside each other Hamilton's grave is very large. Yeah. Pennies on it. People would leave pennies. People would leave money on it and stuff like that. You know, what, what did you, 

1  

00:47:45

It, well, it's a, it's a custom and I believe it's a Jewish custom. If I'm not mistaken, just to show that they were remembered and forgotten, it's just a token. Sometimes you'll see a rock or, or just something on there. And that's why 

0  

00:48:00

Kind of like an Hispanic tradition where they have an all Frenda where it's like an offering for someone who's passed away. So yeah. I could see that. I mean, I just saw, I mean, it's all have photos of it. And when, if y'all have seen, I do post photos from the episode, kind of in a little, just a little carousel thing on there. So you can see just kind of different things from it. And so I'll post a photo that I have of Hamilton's grave while I was there. It's very interesting to go there. It's very hidden. 

1  

00:48:33

That's her passion know that it's there 

0  

00:48:36

And there are two Trinity churches, people I'm going to go ahead and tell you right now, because guess who went to the wrong one first? 

1  

00:48:43

Well, and also Trinity church is also where, if you love the movie national treasure, you know, when sweet Raleigh says, who wants to go down the dark creepy tunnel first that's also that church. 

0  

00:48:57

Yes. And it's, it was actually being renovated at the time that I was there so I can see parts of it. Yeah. Cause you were there at a 

1  

00:49:06

Year, a year 

0  

00:49:07

Before me maybe. And so yeah, it was under construction. So I didn't really get to see a whole lot. I had 

1  

00:49:13

Just our next instruction when I was there. 

0  

00:49:15

They were, yeah, it was, I was so upset because I wanted to see it because I've seen the national cathedral in DC and it's amazing, but yeah, it's there. So just fair warning. If you ever do decide, you're going to go to Manhattan and find Hamilton's grave. If you see a Trinity church that is near the nine 11 Memorial, it is not that church. Go ahead and tell you, because I 

1  

00:49:38

Know them both at the same time, 

0  

00:49:40

I thought, well, it could, because I was like how weird Trinity church is right here. Because you know, I went to the nine 11, which 

1  

00:49:49

Everybody needs to go at least once. And if you were alive during the time, you need to prepare yourself. Some, some parts that I could not go through, 

0  

00:50:00

I did not go into one world trade. I didn't do that. I decided to do what should we call it? Now that I'm trying to say it. I can't say it anyways. I was going there. A lot of people don't know this about me. I'm definitely terrified of Heights. I do not like them. I, I'm not a fan. And there's this place that I know I've looked at videos when you're in like the elevator at one world trade and stuff. Like there's all this crazy stuff around on the walls and stuff as you're going up that like show the city, but it's not the city. It's a photo. 

0  

00:50:40

And then there's one place where you can kind of walk over it and it's like a screen, but it's like what it would look like. If you look straight down at the ground anyways, it's crazy. I don't like it. I'm not a fan of that. Yeah. It's it's not a fan. Don't 

1  

00:50:56

Love it. So you're not going to get into the grand canyon. Nope. 

0  

00:51:00

But I did go to the other building. Yes. And that's, that's 

1  

00:51:03

The one that I was more with the artifacts and everything. I'm 

0  

00:51:06

Trying. No, I'm tying the it's gonna drive me insane. Short drive. Very short drive. I'm sorry guys. If y'all are like screaming it in your car, it's the other building that is in New York. That's very famous. You go to the top of it. Elf was filmed there. Empire 

1  

00:51:25

State. Yes. Oh my God. I told you, Hey, 

0  

00:51:28

I know I had no idea. I just remember that. For some reason I blanked. I was like, I know this building. I was there. I stood. And if you can go at night, guys go at night. But yeah, if you, if you were alive during nine 11, if you felt the impact of that, I was younger when nine 11 happened and I still vividly remember it. I can't talk about nine 11 a whole lot because I get very emotional and very upset. And I am telling you that every year on the anniversary, they try and play that phone call and they sneak it up on you. And I can't handle it. I don't listen to anything on the radio or anything on nine 11, because you'll know if you know, nine 11, you know, the phone call I'm talking about. 

0  

00:52:15

And it just starts with, Hey, Jules. And I can't handle it. I will burst into tears every time. But if you could go to the Memorial, yeah, it is very impactful. B 

1  

00:52:29

Paired. And that support that I couldn't get through was they have a room that plays messages. 

0  

00:52:36

Oh, I can't. And I was like, 

1  

00:52:38

Yeah, I'll be skipping the edit at one point. I really, I was walking with some of my friends. I was actually there with our youth group and I was walking with some of the people and I was like, I've got to make my way out because I'm overcome and overwhelmed. I had tears streaming down my face. You know, I was like, ah, I can't, I can't take any more in, I, you know, it was just, 

0  

00:53:01

It's a lot. The, the American history Smithsonian building in DC, they sneak it up on you. Oh, that's not nice. And it's because it's through like, it's this whole section where they it's like the military and through time and stuff, which is great and wonderful. It needs to be there. It needs to be there. And they have a piece of the world trade center in there and everything for, and I'm telling you, I walked in that room and I heard, Hey, Jules, I walked straight out of that room. I was like, I can't handle this. I can't listen to it. I can't do it. But like she said, if you could ever go, and I know this is on a tangent, but still, if you could ever go and you could see that monument, it's the weirdest place, because it's like a bubble is that you don't hear the city at all. 

0  

00:53:51

It's like, there's this certain space that you walk into and you just walked into a bubble. All you hear is water. Cause it's there's fountains and it's beautiful and peaceful. It's very peaceful, but it's, it's eerie. It's emotional, it's emotional. And they all sound of the city is cut out. It's so weird because then there's a point where you go to like walk out and it's like, all the city here. Everything's a long time. It's so crazy. But yeah, 

1  

00:54:19

She's watched the video. Did you go, did you watch the movie before? No, no idea. So I was already like my, I was already just streaming because I mean, you see my brother-in-law is a fireman and you know, when they show the picture of all of the first responders, he, he's a, he's a paramedic fireman, you know, and not saying that I wouldn't feel as overwhelmed if I didn't have someone that I love that you 

0  

00:54:52

Understand the 

1  

00:54:53

Mentality. And I know like ladder 13, you know, the last radio part of the herd was, you know, letter 13 continuing up. And they, like, they knew what they were going into. And I know that that would be what Ron would do, because that's how those people are wired. They're the ones that run to the danger. Yeah. 

0  

00:55:13

And that it takes a special person to do that. Like, it's, it's very in, you know, it's, it's a lot, but yeah, if you, if, if you decide you're going to go on a tour of New York city, 

1  

00:55:26

You need to do that, but you need to be prepared, bring your tissues with you. 

0  

00:55:29

Yeah. Yeah. Especially, and I don't mean to say this in a bad or a negative way, but especially if you are a us citizen that was in the U S at that time. And remember, was it, it was a lot. It was, I mean, I had 

1  

00:55:47

Been married three months and I was at my first teaching job. 

0  

00:55:51

It was at anyways. I can't, I can't think about it too much more, but, but yeah, it's, it's very difficult. But if you, if you go go to the nine 11 Memorial, go to Trinity church, not the Trinity church by the nine 11 Memorial going to go ahead and make sure that you're aware. Yes, yes. The other Trinity church is there is a, what is that thing called? Their CVS is, but they're not CVS, a Walter Reed, I think, or something like that. Anyways, straight across the street. There's a CVS. And I know, cause I had to go to that CVS to get for my feet because I had blisters all over. It was great. Nice. So wonderful. Had to go by. She had to find a target in Manhattan to buy shoes. 

0  

00:56:33

Anyways, it was a whole ordeal, but it was an adventure. It was a no Duane Reed, sorry. For any new Yorkers. Yeah. Dwayne Reed is right across the street. So if you see a Dwayne Reed directly across the street behind the tread cross, you could see Hamilton from there through yeah. Weird. But yeah, if you ever get a chance to go there, it is really cool. It's just interesting to be there when it happened so long ago, 200 years. 

1  

00:57:03

And it's really neat to kind of beat that part of history. I mean, I went to Scotland and you know, most of the stuff in Scotland that you get, what, the castles and stuff like it's older than our country. Right. And I remember standing in one of the castles and just, you know, looking at my mom and like what w when it really hit me was there was a stone stairwell, like a winding one. And the stone steps had been worn away from . And I was like, these steps are older than our country. And you, you kind of get that overwhelming sense of all. When you see something like trendy charge and, you know, it brings these things that you've heard of brings. 

1  

00:57:47

It 

0  

00:57:48

Makes it 

1  

00:57:48

Real, makes it more real. 

0  

00:57:50

Absolutely. It makes it not a story. Exactly. So, sorry, we're going to we'll end our rabbit trail there. Sorry. Oh, well we both love New York, so we could probably talk about it forever. So anyways, an Asian pro trip there, I'm not road trip in there. I can tell you that I can we'll fly there. I'm barely road trips to new Orleans and back I am not. So in 1807, this is after this is kind of now we're going to go through the aftermath of what happened after birth death, or not burst after Hamilton's death up until Burr's death. 

0  

00:58:30

There we go. So in 1807, the Burr conspiracy came out. It was a plot alleged to have been planned by Aaron Burr in the years as vice president under Thomas Jefferson, according to the accusations against Burr, he attempted to use his international connections to establish an independent country in the Southwestern United States and parts of Mexico. That's interesting. Burr's story was that he intended to use the 40,000 acres in Texas as a farm. 

1  

00:59:07

I mean, that's a heck of 

0  

00:59:08

A 40,000 acre farm. So the land had been leased to him by the Spanish crown Burr was arrested. This is actually, if you are from Alabama and we do have some Alabama listeners Burr was found and arrested in what is now Wakefield, Alabama, which is in Washington county, which is directly above mobile county. So yeah, that's where, and there's fun fact, a marker is placed by the Alabama historical association, commemorating first capture, just showing you how much Alabama will just dig for a historical marker. So Burr was taken in on the grounds of treason, but was released due to there not being any hard evidence, some claim that he intended to take parts of Texas and the newly acquired Louisiana purchase for himself while others believed he intended to conquer Mexico, or even the entirety of north America, Mexico, Mexico sounds so funny. 

0  

01:00:10

I'm sorry. I just see Leslie Odom go into Mexico, making his way down. His, this ruined. This is not the same one. I'm just not saying this ruined Burr even further. And people all across the United States burned anything. They could get their hands on. That looked like Burr. They were burning anything that looked like him. They were, people were furious after he was acquitted due to insufficient evidence. He went to Europe as kind of like a self-imposed exile until 1812 people were burned in likenesses. 

0  

01:00:51

Bird did marry again, July 1st, 1833 to a woman named Eliza Jumel. Again, maybe not how you say it don't know she was a widow who was 19 years younger than him. So like I said, he goes younger. It goes older, goes young. Well, so she was wealthy. And after four months of marriage, she realized her money was disappearing and that Burr was the one spending it shocker. So they separated. She quickly filed a divorce, took a while for the divorce to actually go through, actually took, I think for three years. Yeah. It took like three years for their divorce. 

0  

01:01:32

Finally go through. I mean, because at that time, the only way to be a woman and be in charge of your money was to be a widow. So she had to hire a divorce attorney. Would you like to guess what divorce attorney she sought out and used in her divorce against Ehrenberg these? Tell me Alexander Hamilton, Jr. Which I just love that, like that, that's the one part of this, like a day. I love it. I'm going to go find him. You, you look at him in the face as you sign these divorce papers. I'd like, oh, I love it. So, yeah. So, so Burr had a stroke in 1834 that left him immobile for the rest of his life. 

0  

01:02:19

He died at a boarding house in Staten island on September 14th, 1836. The boarding house he died in is actually the St. James hotel now. Okay. Burr was buried in Princeton, New Jersey, near his father. So y'all stuck in with us this long. Wait, got a question. His father and mother were not buried in the same place. It didn't say that she was buried in the same place, but it's very likely that she was buried near her father because they died. Tom, her mother, father, and father died in the same year that she did. It's very possible. They could have, they could have been buried together. I was just curious. So I told you there was a bonus. 

0  

01:03:01

I told you all that there was a little thing that I had to throw in at the end, a promise guys, we're almost there. You're sticking with us through our rabbit trails and all, but I appreciate that. So when you, we've just got to quickly get to the real hero of the entire story that we are discussing. Would you, do you know who only Sammy I'm on the edge of my seat? Literally Eliza Hamilton. Absolutely. And I have to, I have to take a minute to talk about her. Her father also died the same year that her husband did and only a few months later. 

0  

01:03:45

Well, yeah, so same year she stuck by Alexander through the Reynolds pamphlet and his infidelity. She loved him until the day she died. She was so devoted to Alexander and his writings that she wore a small locket around her neck containing pieces of a sonnet that Alexander wrote for her during the early days of their auction. It's very sweet that didn't get burned. Huh? So after his death, she went on to start the orphan asylum society in the city of New York, which started with 16 children. And before Eliza's death, it took in over 700 children. 

0  

01:04:25

During that time, one of them actually went on to go to west point. Very cool. So yeah, it was great. The organization still exists today under the name Graham Windham, which works with at-risk youth in New York city, Eliza organized all of Hamilton's writings and petitioned Congress to publish all of her husband's writings constantly. When Eliza was in her nineties, nineties, Congress agreed to purchase Hamilton's writings from Eliza and they still sit in the library of Congress today. And while she was in her nineties, she paired up with a Dolly Madison and Louisa Adams to raise money to fund the Washington monument. 

0  

01:05:09

Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton passed away on November 9th, 1854 at the age of 97. Wow. It is said that she was losing her memory right before she died, but she could vividly recall her husband without any issues. She outlived Hamilton by 50 years and is also buried at Trinity church by her sister Angelica and her son, Philip Hamilton, and close 

1  

01:05:35

To Alexander. 

0  

01:05:36

Yes. Right. It right in the same area. So yeah. I can't get these steps away. Yes. Very fused. I can't, I can't talk about them and not talk about Eliza because I had it not been for her. You would not have the Washington monument guys. Like she was the one that pushed for that. She was very close with Washington as well. And she, she did so many other things in there that I didn't have time to put it all in. 

1  

01:06:00

Well then she had to be nice. Right? Well it also all the turmoil in their lives. I mean the infidelity and, you know, standing by him, you know, stand by your man, you know, I'm just saying, I might have an issue with husband. It's just crazy and losing a child. And, but then still raising a child, I mean that you have to be strong 

0  

01:06:23

And losing your husband three years after you lose your child, losing your father in the same year. So not only are you a widow, you don't have your dad who could help you. He's gone too. Because her dad was very well. He was very well off. He was very well known in the city. So all of these things and you still have seven children. 

1  

01:06:45

Yeah. So you've got to care for, then now at this time, her older children, you know, 

0  

01:06:50

We're not that much older though. So keep in mind that little Phil was born the year after his brother died, which would have been 18 0 1 0 2 0 2. So she had a two year old when Hamilton died. So there's 20 years between the oldest and the youngest. So at minimum and all of her kids based on birth dates, there's like a S like the first four, I think were born within two years of each other, and then the last ones, there was more of a gap, like three to four years. So at most the oldest child still in her house would have been around 16. 

1  

01:07:31

Yeah. But at that, at that time, you know, one that age to be able to help, 

0  

01:07:36

So. Right. Yeah. So that would be able to help even. I mean, it's still like, you got a two-year-old now you've got, I mean, your dad and your husband died in the same year. I mean, it's just, it's insane. And then she goes on to live 50, more years T more years in this 

1  

01:07:55

Time. Yeah. She lost 

0  

01:07:56

Eight children. I'm not sure if y'all are and I don't, I'm thinking that's gotten through your heads, shallot that's too many, but anyways, she made it through all these things and live to be 97. 

1  

01:08:07

But what I think is interesting, you know, some of the reading that I've done, the kids, like the younger little Phil, he didn't have the benefit of the same benefits that his older brothers did as far as education, just having money wise to be able to do that. So there, even though they had the same parents, their whole childhood was different 

0  

01:08:30

Very much so. Yeah. It's just insane. And I, like I said, I couldn't talk about all of this without giving a few, few moments to Eliza. She's just amazing. It's just insane to do as much as she did. Yeah. In the time she was alive and with no help, you know, with no help. So that wraps up our two part guys were we made it through episode six. Thanks for hanging in there. Yes. The next one is, it's not a two-parter so it's a little bit, and it's a one y'all haven't heard of I'm sure. 

0  

01:09:11

So I'm sure I haven't, I'm sure you so follow us on Instagram at one nation under crime and on Twitter at O N U C pod. If you love our podcast, as much as we do, please follow us on your preferred podcast platform and recommend us to everyone. You know, anyone. And if you feel like it, leave us a five star review on apple podcasts. We'd appreciate it. We do have a Patrion. If you, for some reason, love us enough to help with the cost of making and hosting the show. You can donate there. You can go to patrion.com search for one nation under crime. If you have a question for us or just a really good story, you want to tell us, you can email us@onenationundercrimeatgmail.com. 

0  

01:09:54

We'd love to read them and we will reply. So thanks for listening to this week's episode and the second part of the Dole of Weehawken. There you go. We appreciate it. And we will see you here. Same time, different crime next week. And remember there isn't always Liberty and justice for all. We'll see you guys next week. Bye.