Aug. 30, 2021

1814: The Stories of John Lewis & Mary Antoine


What do you get when you cross the only US citizen to die in the burning of Washington D.C. and a woman who murders her ex-boyfriend's lover? Episode 16 of One Nation Under Crime.

This week the gals take on two cases in one episode and discuss the murder of George Washington's nephew, how a daughter and father were both executed by the same county years apart from one another, and government jurisdiction on Native American reservations.

Trigger Warning Level: None

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Remember, there isn't always liberty and justice for all.

Sources: Women and Capital Punishment in the United States: An Analytical History by David V. Baker, Smithsonian Mag, Executed Today, Correction History, Murderpedia, NPR, Bureau of Indian Affairs, and Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/onenationundercrime)
Transcript

You are listening to One Nation Under Crime, A Chronological True Crime Podcast. Each week we go through our nation's history and discuss one case from each year, starting in 1800. I'm Kayla. 

Leah  

00:00:13

And I'm Leah 

Kayla  

00:00:15

And we're to episode 16, we can drive legally, only five years till we can legally drink five episodes. So yeah, such milestones. I know we're in the year, 18, 14, and we're going to just get right into it this week. Since we always ended up going off track at some point anyways, but we'll eventually you'll love us. 

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00:00:44

You're here. Let me see lots of turtles. So let's go our sources for this week. We have Women and Capital Punishment in the United States, An Analytical History by David V baker. We have an article from the Smithsonian magazine. Of course, the website Executed Today, website Correction History, two separate articles for murder pedia, an NPR article, lots of sources this week, guys, the bureau of Indian affairs government website and the federal bureau of investigation website. 

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00:01:24

Nice. Did you specifically source Brad on there? Like, is he your, so your, I didn't, I didn't do the NSA. So although I was probably with getting in the FBI, I was probably treading a little too close for Brad liking. And so he probably was a little bit concerned and as he should be okay, because I'm figuring out who he is. So I'm gonna report him to his manager. Cause he's a little, he looked look, he's a little too involved. He's a little too close to say him. And you know, it is what it is. It is and he'll live. 

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00:02:04

So anyway. Hi Brad. Yeah. So the events in 1814 and January 22nd, the first Knights Templar grand encampment in the United States is held in New York city. Nice Knights, Templar national treasure. I watched that yesterday, March 27th general, Andrew Jackson defeated the red stick. A portion of the Creek nation tribe defeated the red stick at the battle of horseshoe bin near Dadeville, Alabama. 

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00:02:48

So, you know, just that's our neck of the woods everywhere. August 25th, British forces destroy the library of Congress, which held around thousand books at the time. We still love you UK, September 14th, Francis Scott Key pin to the poem, defense of Fort M Henry, which is also called the star Spangled banner. Well, yes and Francis Scott Key pinned it while watching the Fort being attacked from a ship in the Baltimore Harbor. It was September 20th, just six days later that star Spangled banner was published as a song with lyrics by Francis Scott Key and music by John Stafford Smith. 

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00:03:38

As many people know that is our national Anthem. So would you like me to sing it? Nope. Let's fast November 23rd, vice president Elbridge, Gary, which we discussed last time, died in office from heart failure. His position remained vacant for the rest of James Madison's presidency, which would have been another three years because last yeah. So another three years that post went on build don't know why wasn't that of the speaker is 1814. 

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00:04:22

It was wild times. I don't know. So interesting. December 24th, the treaty of Ghent was signed, which ended the war of 1812 between the U S and the UK and their allies 1814 the year in itself was also when the world's first complex machine was mass produced from interchangeable parts and it was Eli Terry's wooden pillar clock. And it came off of production. It came off of the production line in Plymouth, Connecticut. 

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00:05:04

Interesting. So it was the first clock made bar machinery with interchangeable parts. It was a mouthful, but that was a big deal. It was a very big deal. So our births in 1814, July 19th, Samuel Colt, the inventor revolver who established Colts patent firearms, manufacturing company, look at me and he made the mass production of revolvers available to the nation. 

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00:05:48

Guess what? My husband and father really liked. I know he's also a cancer. So watch your back. You and your son. Well just saying that's interesting deaths in 1814, that was the only birth. How's the only interesting one. Yeah. One person was born in 1840, just, just Samuel 40 pants. I was meeting that was God, the rest were just like a lot of political people, just like this person was in the house from this year to this year. And I was like, I'm good. That's fine. So the deaths in 1814, January 7th, IRA Allen, one of the founders of Vermont and brother of Ethan Allen passed away. 

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00:06:40

I will take a moment of silence because March 13th, 1814, Angelica Schuyler church, the oldest daughter of Phillip Schuyler and sister-in-law to Alexander Hamilton and sister to Eliza passed away Angelica and Peggy. You're welcome guys. Weren't kidding. When we said there would probably be one at least reference in each episode, especially at this time, because it's still relevant. So yeah, half she die. It didn't say, and I was too sad to look into it. 

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00:07:21

I was too sad. Angelic has my favorite. You are Angelica. I am Angelica, probably Peggy, sorry. I really probably am picky. That is said to be home by sun down downtown. And I'm the one that's like, know you free to go. So the episode this week is going to be a little different than what we have done before. And hopefully people will like it. This is one of those years that it was really hard to find crime that happened. 

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00:08:00

And the case that I did pick for this week, doesn't have a ton of information, but it's a really interesting case. And I don't think a lot of people know a lot about it. So this week I'm going into a little more detail of one of the events in 1814, and then we're going to go into our case for the week. Our case for this week is Mary Ann tone murdering her boyfriend. But before we get to it, we are going to go back to August 25th, 1814, and talk about the soul American killed in the 18, 14 burning of Washington, DC. 

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00:08:42

This is also something that I wanted to cover, but there it was dealing with the war of 18, 12. There's a whole lot of background information. And while this one person was killed, which we'll get into, there's a reason that it's discussed. And it's very interesting, but anyways, we're going to go into it. We've discussed Washington DC briefly in previous episodes, just kind of talking about how the Capitol was in New York. Then it was moved to Philadelphia, then it was moved to DC. So I'm going to do a quick refresher refresh, which we haven't really talked about DC. So it's really not too much of a refresher. 

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00:09:23

It's also known as just Washington or just DC. It is the capital city of the United States and fun facts. One of, if not my favorite place that I've ever visited, I would live there in a heartbeat. I love Washington DC still do after everything. Anyways, SU it is located on the Potomac river and borders, both Virginia and Maryland, the national capital region portion of the Washington Metro area is also called the DMV. Not to be confused with the department of motor vehicles. 

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00:10:04

It stands for DC, Maryland, and Virginia. So if you ever hear anyone talking about the DMV area, it's DC, Maryland, Virginia, because it's kind of that whole Washington area. And that's what it's called a lot. So just in case, you're wondering now, you know, the city was named, of course, after the first president of the United States, general George Washington comes the president. It is one of the most visited cities in the us with there being over 20 million visitors in 2016 alone, Washington was founded in 1791 to serve as the nation's Capitol. 

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00:10:49

And Congress held its first session there in 1800 in the unfinished building in 1801. Congress passed the district of Columbia organic act, which organized the district and placed it under the exclusive control of the federal government. That will bring us almost up to where we are now in history. Again, another topic I could talk about for a solid hour, maybe two, if enough, people want me to go into more of the history side of important places like this, guys, you know what to do one, let me know to most importantly, join our Patrion and we will do it exclusively for our Patrion members. 

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00:11:31

I'm not kidding guys. I will do an entire history. I'll do a whole separate history podcast on Patrion. Like I'm for it. It's fine. I'll do it. But I have to have enough donors. So go donate to our Patrion and I will do it in 1814. Most of the United States were more concerned with the war of 18, 12 than anything else. This year specifically was overrun with news of the war because 1814 was the climax of the war. Tensions were high. Americans were overrunning Canadian settlements. The British were pissed off with Americans for attacking the Canadians. 

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00:12:12

Also think about what had gone on in the previous years, the revolutionary war wrapped up just over 20 years before the war of 1812 began. And I can honestly just see the British at the time, rolling their eyes like these American idiots again, like didn't we already fight you once. And we gave you your independence that you fought for. And now we're here again. Yeah. Can we not, can we not? Cause that'd be great. I mean, just saying, so it's not hard to believe that the British were wanting to make a statement once and for all, and we'll see exactly how they did that. 

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00:12:52

We still love you, our listeners in great Britain and in the UK, none of this is towards you, but still frustrating. Nonetheless, and I am half British by the way, just saying, I mean, I'm not half, but I'm probably like a quarter breed, like for real. So during the revolutionary war, they took the, they took New York city and ran the Patriots out. Right? Well, this time they were going for the Capitol and they weren't just there to take it over. They were there to burn it to the ground. 

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00:13:33

That's not nice. President James Madison and the cabinet evacuated the city and troops perched in the Northwest of the city and watched the city go up in flames. Well, gotta be heartbreaking. Yes. And while yes, it is very sad and it's, it's rude honestly, but you also have to think at the time it's for Canada was also still under the British empire rule and with Americans attacking Canadians, you're essentially attacking. I mean, exactly. So I mean just, you know, it's sad exactly your way. The intent by the British army was to destroy important public buildings and go after only American soldiers and not citizens that was made a point British general. 

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00:14:25

Robert Ross was infuriated infuriated. When his soldiers set the library of Congress up in flames, along with the Capitol building, the Capitol building was intended. The library of Congress was not. And so general Ross was furious when he found out that they took it as well. General Ross said, quote, I make neither war against letters nor ladies did for him. The few residents left behind in the city actually commented general Ross, his demeanor, and described him as a perfect gentleman, even though he was there fighting for the British. 

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00:15:08

So that's a very good compliment. It was, but he was, he had a job to do. And then there was John Lewis, he was an American who held a major grudge against the British. He and his brother, Charles were impressed into the British Navy previously. And they had just been released not before. So impressment at this time was taking soldiers and forcing them into service with another country. So the British were notorious for doing this this time. And this was one of the key factors that actually started the war of 18, 12 while great Britain was fighting the Napoleonic war. 

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00:15:50

They needed sailors to help fight France. And so the British were capturing thousands of American sailors and forcing them into the British Navy. At the time, John Lewis made it a point to report that he was quote often and unmercifully flogged. The argument by the British was that John was a British subject. Well, while John was from the U S he was born in Quebec. And at this time, Quebec was the largest British colony in north America, north America, not the United States guys, just right. Reiterating to some people north. 

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00:16:30

America's not just the United States, even though some people think that it is anyways, there's other countries here. Anyway, get off that soapbox for a moment. So one major possibility for John's anger is that he came from a long line of Patriots. Would you like to try and guess who was in his lineage? Tell me Stan again, his names, his name's not going to help you. Okay. Then tell me same as John Lewis, John Lewis, his father fielding Lewis was the son of Betty Washington. Lewis' sister to George Washington, which made George Washington, John Lewis, his great uncle. 

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00:17:12

I mean, and I put this in here last week's episode, which now it'll be probably two weeks ago, Christine, from an that's, why we drink set in their episode about JFK that he had rolled her. She, she was like, that sounds really bad. But to me it was hilarious. Cause you know, me, she just said in their most recent episode that they're talking about JFK and how many conspiracy theories like JFK is included in. And they were talking about this group that is like suspected to deal with Roswell and stuff like that. And they were like, oh JFK, a part of it too. And they were like, JFK's included in everything. 

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00:17:53

Can we just leave JFK alone? And she said that JFK had rolled over so many times in his grave that he's just burrowed himself further into the earth, which is hilarious. And I would like to think that George Washington has done this as well. You know, think about it. The government tried to bury him inside the Capitol building, which we discussed. I did check on this from our Meriwether Lewis episode. And what I said was correct. Look at me, Washington's tomb is actually still two stories below the rotunda of the Capitol building. It was supposed to include a glass floor, which allowed the public to view Washington's tomb, not as body, but the tomb, but goodness, not his body, but obviously it was never created. 

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00:18:44

So anyways, weirdos, they try to put your body in the Capitol building. Then his great nephew was essentially kidnapped by the British and forced to be a sailor in the British Navy. And then somebody tried to steal his skull from his grave. And 1830 old George has probably rolled over so many times, but he is about to drill a hole in that cement sarcophagus that he is buried in. You can see it, you can see a skeleton foot popping out soon because he's done rolled over so many times and there he can't go anywhere else. It's just going to be like a drill going through the side of it and skeleton foot's going to pop out in a year or so. 

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00:19:24

I'm telling you so back to the brothers, oh my goodness. Much like our other Lewis brothers who were related to Thomas Jefferson and tried to, you know, use Thomas Jefferson's name to their advantage, which didn't work. There is distant relation between this John Lewis and those Louis' as well. It's kind of like tell you how will, how will Lewis was George Washington's nephew? And Howell was second cousins to Mary, whether so many connections. 

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00:20:06

Wow. Anyways, they tried to use their great uncles name to help get them out of the Navy and released back to the us Charles, his way of letting everyone know about his lineage was to get two tattoos of the letter, GW and MW for George and Martha Washington nine at this time, tattoos were made with gunpowder, not the safest. Yeah, it was it. They went into it. It was gross. Anyway, John wrote, they really, really, really hurt. So John wrote to his uncle, which was George Washington's favorite nephew. His name was Lawrence Lewis. 

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00:20:47

So many Louis' Louis. And he begged him to ask Congress for help. And that he deserved to be free. John said in his letter, quote particular as my dear father being a distant relation of general, George Washington now deceased. But right before the outbreak of the war of 18, 12, Lawrence Lewis finally gathered everything. He needed to prove that the brothers were American citizens because remember their argument was they're British because they were born in Quebec. Well, in the documents, it was stated twice that the brother's father was George Washington's nephew. 

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00:21:30

So that was what they needed. These documents were sent to the state department and the secretary of state at the time, James Monroe. But the brothers were released by the British, before the documents could ever be looked at. So they were like, well, that's good. The release of John and Charles even made the Washington paper. They were mentioned in the July 4th, 18, 12 speech, which announced the war of 1812. And it stated quote, two of the nephews of your immortal Washington have been seized, dragged and made sailors on board of a British on board of a British ship. 

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00:22:14

They were kept more than a year. How Americans, can you sit down under such indignities? So, you know, tensions, little high. Yeah. But then they were released. They were released at this time already. So yeah, there were probably there, John refused to let the British get away with the way he was treated and voweled quote, eternal and signal vengeance against the tyrants who had kidnapped and scorched him. 

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00:22:56

I will go ahead and say in the last two quotes that I read, they used another word for kidnapping that I took Liberty upon myself to change. It's problematic. Didn't appreciate it. They referred to them as slaves. Oh yeah. And I didn't appreciate that because well, different. I was like, don't love that. Yeah. Were kidnapped. Yeah. I mean, anyway, if you ever go to look it up, don't at me, I'm very well aware that it said something else and it did not say kidnapped. 

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00:23:36

I took it on my own accord to change it. It's fine. I didn't directly quote him. So you can't Sue me anyway. So it wasn't until two years into the war that John actually joined as a sailing master, he was dismissed from duty just a few months in. And considering that the us was pretty desperate for soldiers and they were taking any and everyone, whatever he did must have been pretty bad. And no one was saying what happened. 

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00:24:17

So Pete, who's pretty much crazy. That's what I've gathered because yeah. I mean, they were trying to get any and everyone to help fight. And then just a few months after he was there, they were like, you know what? We don't need. You can go. Thanks. Thanks spent new thing. So he made his way to Washington just in time to see the British set fire to the city named for his great uncle. John jumped on his horse, grabbed his sword and wrote up to a group of British troops where he yelled a slew of obscenities and was waving his sword around while doing it. 

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00:25:08

Well, he was shot and fell off. His horse did well. His body was laying in the street as the British continued to set the city on fire. Yeah. The Washington city Gazette wrote a scathing article about this murder by quote, British scoundrels and stated, I'm not saying British scoundrels, I love you or British listeners. And they stated quote, thus, they have shown their great respect to the memory of Washington and have proved to the world. So the misguided Anglo factional it's here and that their respect to his memory is to murder his nephew and bird, the second house he ever built to the ground. 

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00:26:00

Well, I mean, of course this is again, the press. Exactly. Of course 

1  

00:26:06

It was the U S that was being burned. And so they were 

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00:26:10

Of course, right. I mean, yes. So anyway, the second house is a reference to the white house, which they also burned at the same time. Yes. So that's what they were talking about later. The soldier who shot John Lewis claimed that John came up, John came upon them quickly drunk and threatening them. The soldier was then quoted as saying, I did not stop to inquire whose nephew he was. And that had nothing to do with the business. I mean, by ye 

1  

00:26:48

He was waving his sword, threatening us and 

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00:26:52

Right. 

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00:26:54

Neutral laws 

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00:26:55

Threat. So yeah, that is the story that, yeah, but that's the story of the only American who was killed in the burning of DC in 1814, this very sad. So we're going to go into our next story of Mary and tone. So September 30th, 1814, Mary Anton was hanged in Madison county, New York for the murder of a fellow native American, September 12th, 1823, Abraham Abraham, Antonio walked up to John Jacobs to shake his hand and instead took out a knife and murdered him. 

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00:27:42

Oh, 

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00:27:43

Well that was a switcheroo. 

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00:27:46

So Madison county, New York is located kind of right in the middle of the state, the original occupants in the area where the Oneida nation, the colonists came of course in 1683 and created early versions of counties in the state. And Madison county was originally a part of Albany county, their bridges, their, I don't know, bridges, Madison county. I'm not sure The Oneida were allies to the Patriots during the revolutionary war. And they were given land by the U S after the war to create a reservation for themselves by Oneida lake, which was their traditional Homeland, to which I say, how nice of you us to give them back a portion of the land they were already living on only because they helped you in the revolutionary war, whatever it's fine. 

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00:28:41

Well, at least they had land. Nope, bitter. I will remain bitter anyways. Then we shall 

1  

00:28:50

Call you Mora because Mara means bitter it's 

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00:28:54

For other Iroquois nations were forced to give their lands to the United States after the war, because those nations sided with the British, most of the native Americans had already moved to Canada to escape fighting in the area during Sullivan's raid. We don't have a lot of time to go through this, but it was essentially fighting between the natives and the Patriots to run the natives off the land that was now quote owned by the United States. Even though it was not, the raid went through the areas, destroying homes, crops, and winter stores that people had saved up to make it through the winter. Those who did not migrate north before the raid died of starvation that winter in the late century, the three recognized Oneida tribes of Wisconsin, New York, and the Tim's reserve in Canada filed suit in a land claim against New York state for its treaty and forced purchase of their ancestral lands. 

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00:30:01

After the American revolutionary war seeking the return of thousands of acres thousands, the us Supreme court had ruled the purchase was unconstitutional. As New York did not have the treaty ratified by the us Senate and had no authority under the us constitution to deal directly with the Oneida or right reserved to the federal government. They 

1  

00:30:25

Did not go through the right 

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00:30:29

Channels. 

1  

00:30:31

They didn't jump through the right hoops, 

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00:30:34

Which in turn killed all of these people during Sullivan's raid because the Patriots were like, get off our land. And they were like, it's not your land. And they were like, no, it is. And then afterwards, oh, oops, Ooh. Like that cringe face. So the emoji, oops. Yeah. So anyways, gosh, in 2010, the state offered the Oneida tribe of Wisconsin more than 300 acres in Sullivan county in the Catskill mountains with all of the Catskills, with permission to construct a gambling casino and two acres in Madison county to settle their part of the suit 2010, 2010. 

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00:31:28

The reason I went in more in depth into the Oneida nation is because they are at the center of our case for this week. And this is a classic quote, classic story of a love triangle gone wrong retro. There isn't any background information on any of the subjects in this case. So we're just going to get right into it. Mary Anton was a 21 year old Oneida native American living in the Madison county area on July 27th, 1814, Mary stabbed, another native American woman to death. 

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00:32:11

Mary had a boyfriend from the Stockbridge tribe who left her and rumor had it. The murder victim was the new love interest of her ex boyfriend. The boyfriend had ended the relationship with Mary abruptly and moved on a little too quickly for Mary's liking. So of course, instead of taking it out on the man who did everything, oh, you know, like you should have done Mary, 

1  

00:32:44

You gonna take it out on the girl. 

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00:32:46

Mary blamed the other woman for taking her man. Oh my God, 

1  

00:32:51

Gosh, girls, girls, can we just, can we just not take it out on each other? Can we just agree that boys can 

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00:32:58

Be stupid? Men are garbage, 

1  

00:33:00

Not all men are garbage, but boys can be stupid. And we need to just agree to band together and you know, just not take it out on each other. 

0  

00:33:10

I mean, not all men are garnishment. Most of them, 

1  

00:33:13

Not all men are garbage. There are good ones. 

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00:33:15

So exactly we don't have any further information on the murder victim or on the boyfriend, but there was a big controversy surrounding the murder, but not about the actual crime itself. The native Americans are you that the quote white man authorities did not have the right to interfere with their customs or to have any kind of jurisdiction over them. The native Americans believed whether it were a petty crime murder or any other legal issue. They should handle it within their own nation. According to an NPR article, which is actually just from June of this year, the us Supreme court just upheld the ruling that tribal officer's authority to at least investigate and detain non-native people that they suspect of committing crimes on the reservation while waiting for non tribal law enforcement was upheld. 

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00:34:15

So essentially, if you are a non-native and you were on a reservation and you commit a crime for the longest time, the rule was that basically you would need to call in non-native law enforcement and you couldn't do anything, but now native law enforcement can hold them until non-native law enforcement comes to get them. However, this is problematic because a lot of times what can happen. And I read a few cases on this that happened. Some non-native law enforcement will say they don't have time to come get this person and you can only hold them for a certain amount of time. 

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00:35:01

So they have to let them go. And so there is a epidemic, honestly, of a lot of non-natives on reservations, getting away with crime. Sure. Because of this reason, even like today, this is still going on there. People find 

1  

00:35:19

Loopholes, right? 

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00:35:21

However, when native Americans are not on the reservation, non-native law enforcement has full jurisdiction over the native Americans. So how weird is that? Yeah. You can't do anything to a non-native if they're on reservation land, but if a native is off the reservation, then law enforcement can take over do to, I mean, it's like, it's so backwards. It's like, no, no, no, but okay. But no. Yeah. And again, I can create an entire episode on this stuff. I spend way too much time researching. 

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00:36:02

I'm telling you it is ridiculous, but you ha you enjoy it. You enjoy it. But there's so much information on this stuff. According to the site, bia.gov, which is the bureau of Indian affairs, it is a legal name for an organization. Just putting that out there. The BIA provides police investigative. Nope. The BIA provide the BIA, provides police investigative corrections and law services across the expanse of quote Indian country. There are, again, these are direct quotes from websites. 

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00:36:46

Don't don't. There are currently 574 federally recognized tribes within the boundaries of the United States and almost 200 reservations. Wow. BIA officers are responsible for maintaining law and order within the reservations by patrolling and forcing tribal law and making arrests. They respond to felony crimes, misdemeanors and suspicious activities, but more serious crimes committed are referred to the federal bureau of investigation or the FBI. 

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00:37:27

These crimes include murder, sexual and physical abuse of minors, drug trafficking, public corruption, violent assaults, and financial crimes and gaming violations. However, the FBI was not appointed as a unit of special forces to the department of justice or the DOJ. They were not appointed until 1908. So at this time when this case was going on, local law enforcement was trying to enforce law upon native Americans. And the native Americans were like, no, no, no, we will handle this. So you can go. 

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00:38:09

Yeah. And so in at this time, the FBI was not there to step in and take over. So it was a big issue. Like I said before, in the case of Mary Anton, none of these laws or statutes were put into place. And at this time, just going to ask, but I figured you were tensions between Americans and natives in the area were way high because of things going on while the American settlers in this area were on good terms with the Oneida nation, the natives felt that dealing with crime inside of the tribe was an overstep by Americans. 

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00:38:50

There was a witness to the crime who was the witness, a local farmer named John Jacobs. I'm sorry. I thought of it several times when I was typing. So it was his testimony that compelled the jury to convict Mary and sentence her to death. Oops. Maybe he didn't really help herself either. Oh no. It's not funny. But it's funny because this is just, she's already been sentenced to death at this point. I mean, there's nothing she can do. 

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00:39:30

Right. So she said the woman deserved to die for stealing her boyfriend from her Elma. She's like, I did what I did. I said what I was gonna say. I said what I said, so Marty been sentenced to death. So yes. Oh my goodness. So funny again, go after the people who actually deserve it, don't don't kill them. I mean kill people a few days before her execution, her father, Abraham and brother traveled to the area of the execution painted and in warrior dress appearing to be prepared for a fight. 

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00:40:23

They also might've had reason to worry because Abrams stated that the man who was the witness to the crime, John Jacobs should die due to all of this captain, Daniel Petri could be Petrie unsure, made sure that other peace officers in the area were there and ready to jump into action. If anything were to happen. The day of Mary's execution, September 30th, 1814, there were many native Americans in the village waiting captain Petrie spoke the native language and he made it clear that the Madison county officers carrying out the law were not the ones who were responsible for the execution. 

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00:41:17

The officers were only carrying out orders and that they made sure the laws were upheld. So like, Hey, we didn't do this FYI. So we were following our leader's commands. Just like you follow your commands. Exactly. So Mary's father Abraham and her brother said their goodbyes to her on the scaffold before her hanging, they sent, she was to bay hunt hanged by the Nate neck. Let me try that again. This used to be hanged by the neck until dead it. Okay. So they simply shook hands and walked away without looking back as Mary's execution was carried out and she was hanged for murder. 

0  

00:42:06

It's very sad. Mary Anne tone though. Wouldn't be the only Antonio executed by Madison county road four years after the execution, not four years, but four years, John stayed away far away from Madison county and he refused to return. He knew that Abraham stated on more than one occasion that he would kill John for his testimony in Mary's trial. After nine years, John was finally convinced to move pack and he was assured that he couldn't be harmed. 

0  

00:42:50

Like we're good, bro. Thanks are great. You're fine. Come on back. And John was like, I let's do this. John was hoeing corn in his field one day with a group of men. When Abraham came walking across to greet them, Abraham shook hands with each of them in making his way down the line to John. And then when Abraham reached John Abraham reached out to grasp John's hand and then slipped a knife out of the sleeve of his left arm, stabbed John three times in the ribs, Abraham shouted. 

0  

00:43:33

How do you do brother and ran away before anyone thought to grab him? How do you do? Probably you do brother. Nice. Wow. Yeah. So, wow. And he, he, he gone by, he was like, I didn't really came to do. Wow. Yeah, exactly. So how do you do brother? Abraham was apprehended and quickly tried convicted and sentenced to death. The sheriff <inaudible> was the one to carry out the execution orders and he was regretful of having to follow through them. 

0  

00:44:18

He did not want to execute Abraham because Abraham Antonio fought with the Americans in the revolutionary war and sheriff Chloe's remember their time in the war together, fondly and remembered how much Abraham had done for them 

1  

00:44:39

That he shouldn't have killed a guy. 

0  

00:44:40

And when an opportunity came to escape, the custody of the sheriff, like a bunch of people escaped the jail at one time, Abraham deliberately refused and stayed in his jail cell, even though he could have ran. Well, that was good of him on September 12th of 18, 23, 9 years to the month after his daughter's execution, September 30th, that she was extended at the age of 17. Abraham Anton was hanged for the murder of John Jacobs in front of a crowd of 2000. 

0  

00:45:24

Wow. Abraham Antone's execution was the last public execution of a criminal in Madison county. 

1  

00:45:33

It's almost, my daddy is almost that, that all like that's, that's like my daddy being executed. 

0  

00:45:40

So not only is the daughter Executed, but then the dad is executed. It's like, Ooh. 

1  

00:45:49

I mean, he shouldn't have done that, 

0  

00:45:53

But how weird. Yeah. I mean like 

1  

00:45:56

The daughters shouldn't have, I mean, I'm sorry, you don't kill over a guy. I mean, don't kill, don't kill people. Number one, just don't don't kill people, but don't kill over a dude. 

0  

00:46:07

I mean, but what have we talked about? What are the main reasons that 

1  

00:46:10

People murder, I know, 

0  

00:46:13

Or ride up there for reasons for murder and clearly it's been going on for decades because it's still going on 

1  

00:46:23

Yes. Decades for centuries. But I mean, seriously, don't kill for a dude. I mean, I'm sorry that that's, your feelings were hurt, but yeah. I mean, they're not, they're not worth it. I'm sorry that your feelings were hurt and it made you mad, but I mean, it ain't worth it. 

0  

00:46:48

Exactly. It's just not and I mean, just the Claire came to say, hello guys. I'm sure y'all heard her me out in the background anyways. Yeah. It's not worth killing over. And anyway, it's, it's just ridiculous. And you killed someone in your own tribe. Yeah. 

1  

00:47:17

When your own people, you killed someone, period. I mean, you know, someone's life. Well, number one, their life has ended and really yours has two years will never, never the same. Even if you're not found out your life will never be the same. You're going to have that guilt for the rest of your life. Or, I mean, hopefully you're, there'll be guilty. Hopefully, hopefully you're not a sociopath, but I mean, your life will never be the same. And just so many people's lives are altered that don't have to be. And you know, just, just don't do it. Killing is bad stuff. 

0  

00:47:56

Thank you. Thank you for your, for your moral commentary of killing 

1  

00:48:01

Your wealth on this. My PSA he has 

0  

00:48:04

Saved for the week 

1  

00:48:06

Killing is bad telling us 

0  

00:48:08

Bad. 

1  

00:48:09

Can we all just get along, be nice to each other in a world where you can be anything, be kind. 

0  

00:48:19

I mean sure. 

1  

00:48:25

But do you make fun of people's last names as long as you're friends with them? Because, well, seriously, if I don't like make fun of Kayla for something, she thinks I'm mad at her. 

0  

00:48:36

Oh yeah, that's true. That's true. That's how I show affection. And the same thing with my boyfriend is that's how I show up. 

1  

00:48:46

I mean, if I don't get a sarcastic meme or something from Kayla, I'm like, you're quiet, what's wrong. And we check in on each other. She, she had a kind of stressful week and I sent her a text. I sent her a text. So I was like, okay, one to 10, where are you? How are you feeling? And she didn't text me back for like hours. She didn't see it. And so I sent her texts back and I was like, okay, you're freaking me out. I'm assuming you're at a 12. Well, how are you? 

0  

00:49:23

Yes. And my boyfriend went out of town this week. Usually I see him every day. Like most of the time I'll see him a lot. And so he's out of town and tragedy fulfill the household this week. We're not going to go into it. We don't know all the answers yet, but tragedy Bofill the household and it was bad and I am not an emotional person. And I was very emotional and yeah. So I was like, I was about to be on my way with booze and cheese dip. I'm like, yeah, well that's accurate. Yeah. 

1  

00:50:03

But she really just not seeing my text, but like I hadn't heard from her. And I was like, oh my gosh, she is in the floor in the fetal position. This is bad. I'm G I'm going to have to find a way to break the door down. I just need a key 

0  

00:50:19

Fletcher is going to have to use this little claws, open, open the windows so you can get in. 

1  

00:50:26

But yeah. I mean, we, 

0  

00:50:27

We, we check on each other though when we're little stuff like that, because you gotta have the friends that check on you with stuff like that. And we, we do, but yeah, we, we, we send the, we send nastygrams but there would love. That was funny. I was like, no, I really didn't see it. I'm sorry. 

1  

00:50:46

But I mean, I'll, I'll be here with, with cheese dip and booze. If she needs me to be, 

0  

00:50:50

Oh gosh, that's so funny. Yeah. Speaking. I have a boyfriend out of town. She's got to go pick him up. I got to go pick him up from the airport to go all the way to Orlando and not go to Disney world. Anyways. I can't handle it. Disney world sponsor us as well. Well, actually universal studios sponsors because Harry Potter world, 

1  

00:51:15

Not with cardium Livio saw, 

0  

00:51:19

Saw Olivia saw The tick tock, 

1  

00:51:30

Not me. 

0  

00:51:31

No. I'll try to post a link to that thought. If you watch Harry Potter and you hold it near and dear to your heart, like we do, there is a guy who, I don't know if he's actually British. I can't, I can't recreate scenes, but he recreated best one from the first movie. And he's like, it's you? That has to go on how right. I just know it. Not may not have my eye on a, 

1  

00:52:13

You know, the act, it gets better with each movie. 

0  

00:52:24

So, and then they did one with helium and it is, oh God, Ellie loves the one with helium. She wants to watch it over and over again as 

1  

00:52:33

You roll it in the floor. 

0  

00:52:34

But yeah, I mean, I'm pretty sure it's a crime to go to Orlando and not go to Disney world or universal, but he didn't. I'm sorry. But he, she was saying, she was sorry to Fletcher, not me. 

1  

00:52:50

I bought Fletcher on the nose. I didn't mean to. So, 

0  

00:52:54

But I mean, he did, he went, but he did say that the night that they were, he went for a company thing and the night that they were supposed, like they could go to magic kingdom. It was like thunder storming. Yeah. He said it was bad. Like, you know, obviously he was like, if his son, cause he has, he's like, if he came with me, obviously, like I would have gone. But he also said there that like before lightning or like thunder strikes that there are these alarms that go off by the pool. And he said, it sounds like a fire alarm, like going off, out by the pool. And he said, it was so weird because you would hear it go off. 

0  

00:53:37

And they were like, what? In the, and then all of a sudden you would see like thunder and lightning and stuff like that. So I thought that was kind of funny, but still I still had to give him a hard time for not going while I was here. I was like, I could have gone with you and I would have gone. And it would have been fine. It's fine. It's fine. I'm not bitter. I would've wanted to go to universal though. So, but anyways, that is, that's it for us this week. That is all. And we have a website where you can find any and all OEC information you are looking for. 

0  

00:54:20

It is One Nation Under Crime dot com. We are One Nation Under Crime on Facebook and Instagram. And sometimes you get to see photos of the podcast mascots. One of which is click clack in his little toes around us. If you can't hear him, his photo is on there. And so his Claire's Knox has not made his debut on the Instagram yet. He's kind of shy knocks. Yes. His name suits him. So yeah, we are on Twitter at O N in C pod. If you love our podcast and you do cause you made it this far. Yeah. Tell everyone, you know, about our podcast, recommend us to everyone you see on the street. 

0  

00:55:04

And even those you don't, we don't know ghost could have I-phones stop it. Stop it. Get our downloads up. We do have a lot of listeners and a lot of countries. Gosh, it is so crazy. And we have two patrons on Patrion. So that's so exciting, but we'd like more speaking of Patrion, if you would like to help with the cost of making an hosting to do that, it'd be great. You can find us on Patrion, just search for One Nation Under Crime. It's real easy. It's real easy to sign up and become a patron. There are different levels. I mean it's as little or as much as you want and we would love it. And it comes with perks. 

0  

00:55:44

And if you leave us a review on your favorite podcatcher with a comment, screenshot it and send it to me via pigeon via the, the internets you would like to get it to me. And you will be the new owner of a sticker that I will mail to you. A fancy schmancy, snazzy sticker. So nice. They're dishwasher, safe guys. So you can put a one on bottles or whatever you want to or cups or anyway. So we appreciate you joining us again this week. Hopefully you liked the episode this week. I know it was a little different than what we normally do, but it was better than one. 

0  

00:56:26

It was, it was a twofer and it was better than having a 20 minute episode. So yes. Tried to give you all enough content for the week. We will be back to one case next week. Yes. And yeah, we will see you here. Same time, different crime, just one, just one next week. And remember that there isn't always Liberty and justice for all. We will see you guys again next week. Bye-bye.