Sept. 6, 2021

1815: The Disappearance of the USS Epervier


How many US Navy ships are missing or presumed lost? Where they all swept away by a hurricane? Or is there something much more mysterious to blame?

This week the ONUC gals discuss the disappearance of the USS Epervier. Join them as they dive deep (get it? dive. deep.) into the US Navy, the disappearance of four other US Navy ships before the USS Epervier, and then get lost (literally and figuratively) in what some call the Hoodoo Sea, the Limbo of the Lost, The Devil's Triangle, or as you may know it... The Bermuda Triangle.

Thank you to all of our service persons and families who are a part (and not a part) of the ONUC family . Whether you serve for the United States or for your home country, we admire your bravery and appreciate you for your sacrifice to serve and protect.

Trigger Warning Level: None

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Remember, there isn't always liberty and justice for all.

Sources: Britannica, Naval History and Heritage Command, and 30A 

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/onenationundercrime)
Transcript

You are listening to One Nation Under Crime, A Chronological True Crime Podcast. Each week we go through our nation's history and discuss one case from each year, starting in 1800. I'm Kayla and I'm Leah. And this is going to be an interesting case this week. I like interesting. I did have to ask Leah to give us some insight into the case this week, which is not typical. Typically Leah's is not involved. Nope. In the research, she didn't help very much, but she tried. Oh, I know, but I do try. So as you can tell, by the title of this week show, we are going to be talking about The Disappearance of the USS a pair VA. 

0  

00:00:50

Ooh, that's a fun word. Say it again. No. How? Say it later. There's two different ways to say it. So I'll get to it then, because I'll go ahead and I'll say it here. Someone was not real happy with my pronunciations in our episode about Chicago and it hurt her failing Scott. It didn't hurt my feelings. I just went off. Yeah. I went to from one to 102 seconds because kinds of stuff is hard. It's not easy to say. There are names that are not easy to say. We do the best that we can. And if you even go in, look up different pronunciations on like how to say things, there's going to be 20 different ways to say one thing. 

0  

00:01:31

Absolutely. My maiden name. Exactly. So, I mean, and my last name, I mean, dear gracious, nobody gets my last name. Right. And I get it. So again, I am not a linguist will say, I am not a linguist, so sorry. If I get things wrong, it's going to happen. Occasionally. We're not perfect. None of us are so, yeah, especially, you're not, oh, sorry. So real quick at the top, before we get into the episode this week, we want to give you something we like to give people to give completely free to you. 

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00:02:18

We just need you to take two minutes out of your day to do something for us real quick. Since you're listening to us now, you're already in your favorite podcatcher so you're on apple. You're on Spotify. You're on good pods who made us one of their recommended podcasts this past week. Lemme deal. You know, you're all you're already there. So go give us a five-star review. Leave us a compliment. A funny joke. Confess your undying. Love for us. I mean, cause we know you do love us. Just make sure you put a comment in there. Review then screenshot your review and send it to us. You can send it to us via pigeon, but I mean, Twitter would work a little bit better. 

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00:03:04

Instagram or email, you know, email it to me along with your address, then you will be the new proud owner of a super cool weather. Proof dishwasher, proof, fade proof, maybe LifeProof. Not sure ONUC sticker. You're already here now. So just a few clicks and you're done and you know what? We're going to be super gracious and what, you know, you can wait, you can do it now. So go ahead. Go ahead. Do you need some theme music you're already? No, I think we're good. Okay. We'll give them, they need the silence to really have my ideas. 

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00:03:46

We just need their, they really need the silence to really think about, about what they need. You're just jealous. It's it's true. Okay. So you have had time or you have you finished and you've sent it to me and I should be getting a notification now. Yes. Some people are slow clickers. You shown a music. Sure. No music. All right. So now that you've finished and you've sent it to us and you've given us our five star review and told us how much you absolutely adore and love us as you should, as you should. We will move on to this week's show. We also, I know I kind of put it at the end of the episodes. We also have two patrons now guys. So if you would like to join that elite club you to be, it's not hard as it takes just a few minutes. 

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00:04:33

You can donate as little as $5 each month and it really helps us out. And that we're okay with more. I mean, I'm way more, I mean more would be preferable, but like I said, you can donate as little as $5. You can donate as much as you want. And in the end two guys that will help us with a separate Patrion podcast, which I've already told you all about. And it'll be amazing. So that's up to y'all and I guess that's all we really have up at the top so we can get into the show. So our sources for this week, we have always the good Britannica britannica.com, the Naval History and Heritage Command site, which is history.navy.mil. 

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00:05:27

And then we also have a website from 38, which if y'all don't know some people outside of the U S or, or on the west coast might not know what 38 is, but 38 is like a region of the coast in Florida. That's very, very popular. Sometimes can get a little pricey. I think that is that where Rosemary beaches and stuff like that. I think it is. So I've never been to 38. I've never been to 38. I go to dolphin island. That's my beach. I mean, I've been to a few different ones. I, I like Destin a lot. I've always gone to orange beach, but, or Gulf shores, whatever they say, it's, it's literally at the same place, but so use 38 as well. 

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00:06:13

The events for this week for 1815, we discussed it in the last episode, but James Madison is still the president. And remember that the vice president position is vacant and it's not going to be filled until the next election cycle. So weird 

1  

00:06:31

To me still. 

0  

00:06:32

And I don't know why they did that. I couldn't, I mean, I tried to look into it a little bit, but like why, why? 

1  

00:06:38

I just, you know, isn't that an important, I mean, you know, in Hamilton, you know, John Adams doesn't have a real job, so We solve, 

0  

00:06:49

Yes, we did just, we did just two days ago go to Atlanta and see Hamilton for the second time. And it was just as amazing as the first 

1  

00:07:01

One of our teeth. We made it. It 

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00:07:03

Was, yes, it was very good. Shout out to the Atlanta Fox theater. If y'all would like to be a sponsor of this podcast, we are always taking them. And I'm not really sure what company that they, what company that was that they use for their beverages. But, oh my gosh. And guys, just FYI, just a little like tidbit for you. If you do go to the Atlanta Fox theater, if you go to the bathroom, there's a bar right outside of the bathroom downstairs. It made my night, honestly, very 

1  

00:07:37

Cleverly done. 

0  

00:07:38

And I loved how, 

1  

00:07:40

I mean, not just a bar that you can get, like, you know, non alcoholic 

0  

00:07:44

You get like anything like any concessions, I guess is a better word. They have the concessions like right there, right outside the bathroom. And that theater is just an, a saving way of travel. It is 

1  

00:07:57

Gorgeous. Like you sit back in time. It's 

0  

00:08:00

So nice. I, I will say the only thing I did not like about where we were sitting is we couldn't see the ceiling, but I know that's like real nitpicky because usually when we've gone before we've sat up, you know, kind of like in not really the balcony, I guess, per se, but on the second level is where we've sat. And so this time we sat in orchestra and, but we were sitting in orchestra right where the overhang kind of started. So while our seats were great and it was wonderful. Although yet again, I had someone tall sit in front of me. I don't know why it happens, but I did 

1  

00:08:38

Offer to swap 

0  

00:08:39

At that point. It was, it was fine. I had already gotten used to the woman that I was sitting by at. It was 

1  

00:08:44

Precious by the way. 

0  

00:08:46

Lovely. And I did, and her husband was a retired police officer. 

1  

00:08:53

It was 

0  

00:08:53

Going to say it might've just been like her partner, but her partner that was with her was retired from the police force for after 45 years, which was so crazy. And which is just amazing. And she was a teacher and she was just lovely. 

1  

00:09:10

She was working on her ads and special ed and math for middle school. And on saying Juul in your crown right there. Like I went to school for education. I love the littles. I love high school, middle school. They terrify me in large group. She terrified. 

0  

00:09:26

It's just so precious. She was so sweet and 

1  

00:09:30

Yeah, out there to make friends, wherever we go, we 

0  

00:09:32

Take away. She was out there doing the Lord's work, teaching math, but 

1  

00:09:37

We did also terrifies me. 

0  

00:09:39

We did see Hamilton. It was amazing. It was just so it was so great. We, we love Hamilton. There's so many different facets to it. And it's funny because as we're watching it, so obviously the last time that we did go see a, we didn't have a podcast. And so as we're watching it, I'm looking at it and I'm like, Hey, Hey, remember that right here. Eliza's pregnant. And it's like, oh, that makes this even more sad because it was when no spoilers guys, cause it was 200 years ago. But when her son Philip dies, there's a scene of it. And, and it's hard to think right there when you're like, oh, that's when she was pregnant. 

0  

00:10:22

And she was pregnant with Phil, like with little Phil and it's like, oh, oh 

1  

00:10:26

Yes. Yeah. And there may have been mentioned of the MF at some point 

0  

00:10:31

We did. Yeah. Cause they talked, they went through the, the levy week and nonstop. They talk about lovey weeks. So it was great. It was a fun time again. I'm not sure what the premixed beverages are that they have. And they had a creamsicle Mohito, which they were out of. And I was real upset about it. And then they had, I know, I mean, I was all right. And then they had strawberry mango, which turned out to be pretty amazing. But the girl, I remember the girl at the concession and she like accidentally rang me up for two. And then she goes and I went, oh, I think you put two. And she was like, oh no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no. Just give me, just give me this. Just give me the second one. It's fine. 

0  

00:11:11

And then she shared with me not a whole one. I looked, well, Leah had already had a glass of champagne, so she didn't need a whole one. Wasn't 

1  

00:11:19

Actual champagne. It was for second. 

0  

00:11:22

And I, well, I forgot what you had gone because originally you said champagne, but 

1  

00:11:26

Yeah, they, it says champagne cause they try to trick you, but champagne is not personal. 

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00:11:31

Yeah. Leah had she's bougie. Lia had her Perseco and sour cream and onion. 

1  

00:11:39

I was like, oh I am so high class. I've got to have something in my stomach. If I'm going to have 

0  

00:11:44

What's funny though, is we were, she was in line behind me. Cause I had gotten out of the bathroom before she did and saw us in line and I got mine and she asked me, she was like, oh, what did you get? And I told her, I was like, well, you know, this is what I got. And then I looked down at the bottom and I went, if you get that, you can only have one because the alcohol content already, you cannot have more than one. So that is why she only had a portion of the one that I had after she had her per second drinker. She's not I'm, I'm very, I CA I don't know. I, I come from a family of unfortunate high tolerances. So, you know, yes, 

1  

00:12:24

No, it is. I will enjoy a beverage on occasion. It will be a beverage. 

0  

00:12:29

And then we went after that, we went to this Irish pub. I think it was called photo. It was fad. Oh. With like the little TEALS over it. And it was so good. Some of the best fish and chips, 

1  

00:12:43

It really was. And I, I will write some fish and chips cause I've had the real deal. 

0  

00:12:49

Oh gosh, I'm sure I need it. I need our, and I know that y'all are listening. I need our friends over at Scottish murders to tell us what the best, like way proficient. I'm sure they would know like the best, what is the best way for fish and chips? You know what I mean? Yeah. 

1  

00:13:07

Yeah. Well, I mean, and it's, it's, it's in the batter and it needs to be, I believe haddock is the correct fish. Like it can't just be like any fish. And I mean, like when you go to a chippy in Scotland, like it's, they wrap it in the newspaper and you've got your oil, like, no, your, all your, your vinegar and it's just, oh, it's just so good. And it's crisp and you don't want it to be soggy. I'm going to Find it good over here in this state. So this flavor come over disappointed. 

0  

00:13:39

I'm just telling you made it so that the fit anyways, 

1  

00:13:44

It was Irish and Scottish, I will say yes. True. 

0  

00:13:47

But it was so like the fish, all of it was so perfect. And he had great men who he is. Anyways, if you go to the Fox theater and you were on Peachtree, you can just take a, take a short four block, walk in the other direction, not in three inch heels. No. And that was her mistake. And then you can go and you can eat it photo. And it was amazing. And they had Manchester United was playing that day. So they have the Atlanta soccer club was there when we were on our way in. So anyways, our weekend, sorry we had to, oh, it was so fun. We, I love Atlanta if you, and if you're ever, I could give you all a guy to Atlanta. 

0  

00:14:28

My boyfriend could too. Cause he's he's from north of Atlanta, but if you ever go and you're there for breakfast cafe Intermezzo is fantastic. They have a coffee that has like an orange rind. Anyways. It's amazing. Back on topic maybe for a minute. Yeah. James Madison. Okay. Yeah. We went over there. January 8th was the battle of new Orleans, which was a part of the war of 18, 12. The war had ended on the display. I thought the war was over. Yeah. It had ended on the 24th of December in 1814, but none of the combatants knew. And so Andrew Jackson defeated and invading British force at the battle of new Orleans, which makes sense, because again, not to like spoil anything, not to go back to Hamilton, but there is a part in the play, sorry, you're most, if you haven't watched it, but you should have already, it came out in 2017 and Disney plus is exactly. 

0  

00:15:23

And I mean, you have no excuse now it's been on Disney plus for over a year, but it there's a scene. That's not on the track or anything like that. And it's when John Lawrence dies and in the letter, which is an actual letter that came from John Lauren's father, he says the war was already over, but like, they didn't know that the war was over. And so I have a feeling that's kind of common, common in any time, unfortunately. Right. So then January 30th, the us library of Congress is re-established after our episode last week and Thomas Jefferson donated 6,487 books. 

0  

00:16:11

Wow. So there was a second fire in 1851 and two thirds of these were destroyed in that fire. But Jefferson's library is in the library of Congress still to this day. And it's all behind like glass. And it's like, this is truly one of the coolest things I've ever seen because it's like, you can see both sides of the bookcase. It's all encased in glass and it's, it's so cool when you can see, and they have like little the cards that say like, which, you know, like if you can't read what the book is, it kind of says, you know, this is what this is. And they're so like, they're so beautiful. 

0  

00:16:52

And they're well-preserved, and they're in that glass that really like preserves them. Well. So it's really amazing. If you ever go to the U S library of Congress, it should still be there the last time that I was there, I saw it and think it's sustaining thing. That's always there, but I'm not a hundred percent sure. But if you ever do get a chance to go, just go to the library of Congress in general, it's absolutely gorgeous. It is. I've never been there, but I've seen video and such. It is, it is amazing. It is just so beautiful. And there's so much detail. It's one of those that you walk in and you look up at the ceiling and you could just walk around looking at the ceiling because there's so much, like there are names on the ceiling of different authors and like, literally it's just so cool. 

0  

00:17:39

And then you go, there's a place where you can't really go in the physical library of Congress without having like a reason to be there for, right. But there's a place where you go up the stairs and they have putable marble staircases. It's just, it's the most beautiful building I've ever seen. And you go up to the top and there's this place where you can kind of go in and there's like a balcony over the top of the actual library, but you're in like a glass enclosure. So you can't the people down in the library, can't hear you. And you can see like the rotunda of it's. It is absolutely gorgeous. Like to see it in person and to see like how massive it truly is. 

0  

00:18:22

And they have like all of the major, like I said before, like the literary, you know, people of our time like Homer and everything, they have major statues of them that sit up in the rotunda and you can come and see all the way around to see who they are. It's amazing. Again, I'm obsessed with DC. It's an issue to other people, not things I do, I do, but most of them support of your charm. And most of them honestly surround history. So I guess I'm consistent if nothing else. So February six, New Jersey issued the first American railroad charter to John Stevens. 

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00:19:02

February 17th. The treaty of Ghent is ratified by the us Congress and signed by president James Madison, which officially ended the war of 1812, which was over a month after it had already been signed in Europe. So it had been signed in Europe and brought over here. It was ratified and then signed again by James Madison. Okay. September 23rd, the great September Gale of 1815 was the first hurricane to strike new England in 180 years, which is very fitting. Yeah. As of recently, if you are not aware, we've had, we've had quite the string of hurricanes lately and we had another one that went to go hit new England again, which was, you know, not common. 

0  

00:19:48

This is the first time I don't remember. They all have weird ideas coming now. Isn't it? Ida is hitting us. I think it was Henri that hit. Yeah. I believe it might've been, Ida is what is now currently raining on us. So we get, this is definitely, we've definitely hit hurricane season hard for us. It's not too bad cause we're in Birmingham. So we just catch like the remnants of it. But it's skipped the rain. We get the flood when yeah, we get the, we get the rain, the wind and flash flooding. So then December 25th, the handle and Hayden society is created, which is the oldest continuously ran performing arts organization in the United States. 

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00:20:39

And it gave its first performance at the King's chapel in Boston. And then this was just an undated event that happened in the same year. But the second wave of Amish immigration started from Europe to north America. So there was another wave coming in and our births for 1815, January 21st Horace Wells was born. He was a dentist and an anesthesia pioneer. So we'd have his hand in hand. Yeah. So we've got a lot to thank for that. 

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00:21:20

He's an Aquarius for any wondering and weird funnish ish. I say fun ish fact. It is unknown exactly how anesthesia works. Let that sink in for a moment. Guys, you are being put to sleep and it is not a hundred percent known how anesthesia works. Also. Other side of that, you can join my mind for this week. It's also not known how eels reproduced. That's neither here nor there. I can't comprehend it. I've watched videos anyways. Nobody knows how it was reproduced anyways. It's, it's fine. And I'm the one that gets the text just on a random Friday night in all caps period. 

0  

00:22:02

After each word, nobody knows how eels reproduce and that's the text, that's it. And I will say that does tie into our entire story this week. So I'm not completely going off base because it does tie in. So our death, one of the desks for this year, again, guys, a lot of people were born in died in these years. A lot of them are politicians. And I mean, not that any death is insidious, correct. It's just not, people will not find it a hundred percent interesting and it would take us forever to go through all of it. But December 3rd of 18, 15, John Carroll died. 

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00:22:42

And he was the first American Roman Catholic Archbishop. So into our topic this week, we are going to discuss a different kind of topic. I, as you all probably have gathered, I kind of like topics that border on the supernatural or the unexplained. Yes you do. But don't skip over the episode yet because this is more of a widely known phenomenon than anything. 

0  

00:23:22

This week we are going in depth into a few different cases. So we're not going to the Catskills. No, but we are going into depth into a few different cases and we are going to end with the case of the U S S it's two different ways to say it guys it's either a per year or a per VA. So it was originally we'll get into it. It was originally owned by great Britain than the U S took it anyways. So there wasn't a case again, and this year, as far as like a true crime or anything that had a lot of information to go off of. 

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00:24:02

And you know, some of them were in similar areas that we had done before. And I can only give you all so much information on one area. So we're going to try to go through this kind of as quickly as I can with what we have, because there is a lot of information to go with this. So this case is a mystery and a disappearance wrapped into one because we are going to discuss The Bermuda Triangle and what it has to do with The Disappearance of the USS Epervier, 

1  

00:24:45

You know, growing up, I always thought that The Bermuda Triangle was going to give me a whole lot more trouble than it ever has. 

0  

00:24:51

You want to know another one? What quicksand? Right. 

1  

00:24:56

Like 

0  

00:24:56

I thought it made me think that this was going to be a much bigger issue. 

1  

00:24:59

I haven't had an issue with it yet, not yet. And all of my 40, some odd years of life, 

0  

00:25:05

Right? And with the topic this week, we are going to dig into a topic that is near and dear to Leah's and last, and that is the history and the beginnings of the us Navy. 

1  

00:25:22

Well, I have two Navy men that I love. 

0  

00:25:27

They, I will, as much as we love those two gentlemen, neither one of them were any help. When I had a question, they really were not. 

1  

00:25:34

One of them was quite sarcastic and tongue in cheek. 

0  

00:25:37

He was, which makes me love him even more. So July 14th, 1815, the USS per VA was last reported sailing through the straits of Gibraltar after it left Algiers Algeria for Norfolk, Virginia, with 132 sailors and two Marines on board from everything that I can find, no, thanks to one, the Navy to anyone we know in the Navy, there are roughly, and I put that in all caps, 42 us Navy ships that are missing or presumed a loss 

1  

00:26:22

Estimate that he number, they 

0  

00:26:24

Threw out a number, which was close to 42, but not, not quite, but there are roughly 42 that are missing or presumed lost since the U S Navy was formed. And around six of them were supposedly lost in the Bermuda Triangle. So keep that in mind, the military isn't really known in any country for transparency. So there really is no telling if these numbers are actual numbers or just the ones they want us to know about. Cause I'm pretty sure I have it in here, but there's another number that's going to be a bit shocking to you. 

0  

00:27:07

I'll go. Well, I'll go ahead and tell you here. Lee is never going to guess the number of hundred. Nope. So there are approximately 3 million shipwrecks in the ocean right now, not just Naval, just shipwrecks period, 3 million, 3 million million, like that is it's quite a musket. So yeah, there's really no telling and yes, there are other ships that, that have gone missing in this timeframe. 

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00:27:49

We will quickly discuss one at the very end because it ties back to something that we've discussed before, but we are really just going to be going into us Navy ships. And we're going to go into the history of that now. So the us or the United States Navy as defined broad Britannica is a major branch of the United States, armed forces charged with the defense of the country at sea and the sea born support of the U S military services and the maintenance of security on the seas, wherever the interests of the United States extend. I can sing the hymn. 

0  

00:28:30

We're good. It was on, we've got a lot of info to get through this week, but I'm trying, I'm sorry. We got, we got a lot guys. And I know I tried to cut it down as much as I could, and we actually cannot go through the entire history of the United States Navy because it would take so long again, I'll do another episode later in patriotic, but it, I had to stop at some point with the history because it gets very interesting because there's a whole thing and there's a lot to it. And there's a lot with the formation of the U S Navy, which is what we're really going to get into. That's interesting with some of our favorite people that we've discussed before. 

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00:29:10

So it was on a Friday, the 13th in October of 1775 that a meeting in Philadelphia with the continental Congress voted to equip two ships. They were to be armed with 10 carriage guns and swivel guns manned by a crew of 80 and then sent out for three months to try and cut off the British army who was trying to bring in equipment for the loyalists. This was during the revolutionary war. So again, like I just said, it all ties to the revolutionary war, a British essentially controlled the waters at this time because they had more experience than the Patriots did on the water. 

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00:29:50

Many of those in the continental Congress didn't want to equip a continental Navy because they hoped that there could be some reconciliation or agreement with the king did not happen. No, there was a small faction of men who were pushing to get soldiers out on the water. One of these men who you might know because he later became president, was John Adams of Massachusetts. The argument from Congress was that it was too much of a bold move when the Patriots were already at a slight disadvantage in the war after all, they've decided to bite the hand that fed them to gain independence. 

0  

00:30:36

And even though they were fighting the British, they didn't necessarily want to cut all ties with them because they kind of did need them for trade purposes later on. So while you're still at war with them, there is a smart, you know, there is a smart side to still thinking, Hey, even though we're at war, we might need them later. Like, you know, we might need to give it a little time to cool off, but like, we don't want to destroy the British Navy that's coming over. Cause we need it a little bit later on and look at us now, 200 years later, still friends with the British. 

0  

00:31:18

So, you know, the formation of an official Navy would imply independence of the colonies and those who did not want, you know, the ones who didn't want to reconcile were the ones who were pushing for that independence. But the ones who did were timid to make that move the most that Congress allowed was for each colony to obtain their own armed ships, to protect their individual harbors and coasts, which would make it look a lot more like an individual effort than a collaborative Naval force, which makes sense. Yes. The first use of this occurred after the battle of Lexington, the early Naval battle took place right after the battle nine of the 13 colonies sent armed ships to protect trade on the sea. 

0  

00:32:07

George Washington took over the continental army in July of 1775. Imagine his shock when he found out that the continental army of which he just took over had no ammunition. Oh, none, none. They had no ammunition. So yeah, not great. He immediately dispatched ships from Rhode Island to go to Bermuda for gunpowder and Commodore. John Manley was the most successful, great last same commander of the ships in one ship raid, manly captured a British ship that had so many weapons and ammunition on it. 

0  

00:32:55

It would have taken the colonies 18 months to manufacture the same amount that they stole from the British. Wow. Right? So on October 3rd, 1775 Rhode Island, delicates put a proposal out asking for an American fleet as soon as possible because all of this was coming from Rhode Island. Rhode Island was kind of like, well, we're kind of the ones, you know, running the show right now. You need more ships. We need help. The proposal was really vague, even for those who were pro Navy and Samuel Chase, a delegate from Maryland said that it was quote the maddest idea in the world to think of building an American fleet. 

0  

00:33:42

He ate his words later. The most that they could really hope for at the time was for there to be a short term solution to what was going on. You gotta start somewhere. You gotta do something it, yes. Two days later, Congress received word that two British ships who were unarmed with ammunition were leaving England and on their way to Quebec, this was an opportunity too good to pass up. So a committee was formed to figure out how to take advantage of this Intel. The community, the committee were not only all pro Navy, but they were all new Englanders. 

0  

00:34:23

First. They recommended the governments of Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut dispatch arm ships to wait for the incoming ships. Second, they formed a plan for Congress to arm two ships to head eastward, to set the British ships in order to obtain the supplies. Well, that plan sat for eight days. When a letter came from George Washington, Washington wrote that he bought three ships that were to depart from Massachusetts and intercept the enemy supply ships keep in mind. 

0  

00:35:03

He bought those ships with continental Congress, footing the bill and did not ask. He just said, this is what we need. This is what we're doing. And I'm not sitting around for you and Congress to figure out this is what we're doing. You're not out here. We got to go like too bad to go, got to get the job. So literally the same plan that the committee came up with and Congress sat on Washington, said that he expected Congress to be hesitant on fitting worship. So he just did it on his own. Well, there you go. He definitely believes in asking for forgiveness instead of permission, this turned into a victory for the committee because there were already three ships headed out under Washington's command. 

0  

00:35:54

What's two more, which made this particular Friday, the 13th, a very lucky one was just not, you know, generally what people think, the stuff, the popular idea, true Friday, the 13th actually are pretty, pretty lucky that, but anyways, the continental Navy became more important than its opponents realized. And soon a Naval committee was established to get together a fleet. This committee was in charge of purchasing, meaning outfitting and operating the first ships of the Navy, the committee, then draft legislation, rules and regulations to govern the continental Navy. After all of this Congress sent out more than 50 ships during the revolutionary war. 

0  

00:36:40

In other words, they cut supply lines and don't steal contraband from around 200 British ships, 200 British ships and 50 were coming from the colonies. So they did pretty well for themselves. Worked out for them, worked out once the war was over, the continental Navy was disband and the ships were sold. The first Congress to serve under the rules of the new constitution, thought a Navy really wasn't necessary. Why? Of course it didn't take long for them to realize that this was a big mistake. 

0  

00:37:22

Yeah. Cause Barbary pirates destroyed us goods and Congress outfitted six frigates in 1794 and established the Navy department officially in April 30th, 1798, for those who aren't aware of the Barbary, this is kind of around the Barbary war. And this was pirates operating from the coast of north Africa. And so they were intercepting a lot of us ships and they were stealing from them. And so that's kind of where you'll hear when you, when you hear anything about history, you'll have the first and the second Barbary war. That's where this comes from. 

0  

00:38:02

So the Navy Navy department was officially created in April. Yeah. April 30th, 1798, which is really interesting because the Navy's birthday is considered October 13th, 1775, but it was not, it was not official until April of 1798. So over 20 years later, which is weird. I mean, it was at that time it was done, but it was under the colonies. It wasn't under the United States. So it's very weird. It was the continental Navy in October of 1775. 

0  

00:38:43

It was not the U S Navy until 1790. That was the first time 

1  

00:38:46

It was used, 

0  

00:38:47

But it was disband and it was just a continental Navy. So anyways, semantics, I know I get caught up on them, but I thought that was very weird. He wouldn't literal girl, very little girl. Damn. I thought that it was very weird though, that they chose that date. Anyway, 

1  

00:39:05

This, this the other day. Yes. 

0  

00:39:08

In our last episode, we discussed the burning of DC and we briefly talked about impressment, which was when the British were kidnapping American sailors to help them fight against France and how the us was in desperate need for sailors during the war of 1812 to protect ports and prevent the British from destroying them during this time is when the USS constitution was a part of the American fleet, which you can add. 

1  

00:39:36

I actually go and tour in Boston Harbor and my brother got to tour and he got to go into places that the public does not get to go into because he is official. He is a sailor, which is pretty sinking. Awesome. And I was very jealous. Continue. 

0  

00:39:51

If the USS constitution does not sound familiar to you, then you might know it by the ship's nickname, which is old iron sides. So a lot of times it'll be referred to as that in a lot of different texts. This is one of the oldest commissioned warships, still afloat today. I can't go through everything that the Navy has done simply because we don't have enough time. As I said before, Patrion episodes, history, you know the drill, but we have to stop there because we are already 40 minutes into this recording and we still got a lot to go through. So 

1  

00:40:31

I know lots of things, guys. 

0  

00:40:32

Yes. I said at the top of the episode that there are roughly 42 ships missing or presumed lost by the Navy. The first was the USS Pickering. It was built Newbury, Massachusetts in 1798. The Pickering was 178 tons and had a 77 foot top sale. August 20th, 1800. The Pickering was seen leaving new castle Delaware in route to the west Indies. And it was never seen again. Wow. Wow. It is assumed a hurricane which overtook Florida to The Bahamas is what caused the ship to go missing this hurricane took place on September 20th. 

0  

00:41:15

Just one month after the Pickering was last seen, there was a newspaper report in December of the same year that stated seeing a quote, large copper bottomed brig with quarter boards in a range of ports seen bottom upwards. Once the hurricane had passed, there's a possibility it could be the Pickering, but there isn't any definitive proof that this is accurate. As of this recording in 2021, the location of the USS Pickering is still unknown. Hm. Next up we have the USS insurgents. 

0  

00:41:55

This was a 1,726 ton shit. It was 148 feet long outfitted with 36 gun ports. It was built for the French Navy at Lorian pretty sure maybe who knows. And officially girl now, I mean, whatever Sumi officially set it officially set sail with the French Navy on April 27th, 1793, the original name of the ship was the Lynn surgeon day. Nice. Maybe who knows Donna, I'm not French, but once it was captured during a battle, the USS constellation is the one that, that took it over and then sent it to the United States. 

0  

00:42:46

It was repaired purchased by the continental Navy. And then that's when the name was changed to the USS insurgent. The insurgent left for the west Indies on July 22nd, 1800 under the command of captain Patrick Fletcher. Oh, Fletcher. He's he's laying at our feet right now. He's being a good boy. He's a very good boy. He's not letting his little toes click clack. Like they usually do the 227 man crew. And the insurgent were last seen on August 8th, leaving Norfolk, Virginia. The USS insurgent is also assumed to have been swept away by the same hurricane that took the USS Pickering. 

0  

00:43:31

Secretary of the Navy, Robert Smith wrote to Congress on February in February of 1802, stating that both ships were lost in the quote economical Gail of September, 1800, the USS insurgent has also never been recovered as of this recording. Then we have gunboat number seven, gun boat, number seven. It was 71 feet long with two with two long 32 pounder guns launched. Yes, the ship launched on February 6th, 1805. 

0  

00:44:14

It was dispatched to help with the Barbary pirates that we discussed before the ship left New York on May 14th, but it had to return because the mast broke. It arrived back on May 30th and all, but three sailors abandoned the ship. 

1  

00:44:33

Oh, that's, that's 

0  

00:44:34

Not good. So they had to reassemble and a crew and they left New York again on June 20th. So just 20 days later, they left nine other ships were also dispatched to help, to help with Barbary war and with pirates and out of the 10 total eight made it to their destination. So two were unaccounted for, 

1  

00:45:01

I wonder if it was the two that decided to stay out of the original crew? 

0  

00:45:05

No, no. The two, there were 10 boats that left of those boats, meaning 

1  

00:45:12

My bad. I misunderstood 

0  

00:45:17

One of those boats that did not make it. It did sink and there's proof that it did seem, they are aware of that. But when gunboat number seven left on June 20th, 1805, it wasn't seen again, Naval historian, Edgar Stanton McClay wrote in 1893 that quote the fate of this gun boat only to plainly showed what a great risk, the men who command and manned the other vessels of its class took when they sailed across the Atlantic. In them, again, as of this recording, it has not been found. 

1  

00:45:58

I'll say the ships that, that they sale now are so much larger. And that the technology is so much greater. I mean, yes, when my brother goes out and he is at sea, of course you worry about them, but this, Hey, they're in a ship at sea, but it's, they're quiet, 

0  

00:46:17

Large target for anyone looking for it. 

1  

00:46:21

But I mean, he he's on a destroyer. So I mean, it's not like an aircraft carrier, which is a city. 

0  

00:46:27

Oh yes. An aircraft and aircraft carrier guys are those ones that you see that are out on the ocean that they literally have planes taking off. Yeah. And they have all of the planes like lined up down the top of the ship. The is an actual like carrier and they are, it is a city. 

1  

00:46:48

Yes. It is a city in the state. Really. It really is. And a destroyer as a smaller ship, but it still, you know, quite large, larger. Yeah. It's still larger. Even though it's a smaller ship, don't call it a boat. You'll get in big trouble. Right. But, you know, just imagine these, I mean, even though they were large ship ships, they were wooden. They, you know, they, 

0  

00:47:14

And they didn't, and we'll get into it. They didn't have any real way to know where they were going. 

1  

00:47:20

I think then navigate about the stars and such, but they, you know, and, and my brother's area that, that he does he's sonar, which is pretty sync and awesome. Like you could, you can hear well sometimes, which is pretty cool. But anyway, so just at that time, the technology just wasn't there. So it, it, you know, it was, I don't want to say primitive, but you know, with the technology and things half an hour, it was, yeah. It was more primitive. So I just wanted to, but I didn't say that. So you can continue 

0  

00:47:53

Think about it. You get a map, you get a little telescope, you got the stars and you got a crew that's depending on you, 

1  

00:48:02

What the thing is called, but it's like, it it's like a, oh gosh, I'm thinking math sta, but it's flat on one side and it's like a half circle, but like, it's, it's bad agrees. And it, it shows you the direction. I can't think of what it's called. There's a word for it. And like, you, it, you use that to see that, you know, where you're going, like in your, you use that as well. It's 

0  

00:48:28

Like a Naval compass, 

1  

00:48:30

But there's a word for it. And I'm so ashamed that I can't think of what it is, but I mean, you know, th there were tools to use, but yeah, but that's what you had, you know, you don't, now you have GPS that can help you, you know, know where you, where you are now. And, you know, you can pinpoint and, and you have, you can radio, you know, where you are to, you know, to base or, or to whatever. I mean, you know, we weren't able to communicate with my brother while he was on the ship or let me wicked email with him, but we always loved, and he was able to get into port because he was able to connect with wifi and praise the Lord for video chat and such, because, you know, we were able to see a space. 

1  

00:49:22

And when my dad was in the Navy, a sextant, 

0  

00:49:25

There you 

1  

00:49:25

Go. There you go. They meeting that when, when my dad was in the Navy, I mean, they had to rely on letters and, you know, you didn't just get to call home because I mean, that was expensive. 

0  

00:49:39

Yeah. It's a, it's a lot, it's a lot easier now, especially out on the, you know, especially when, you know, we have people who have been in, we're not political people, we're not getting into it, especially when you have people like who have been over in Afghanistan, you know, on and off tour, we know people who have gone off and have had to go to war and who have come back and, you know, while technology, no, it, it's still not a hundred percent there. And it's still not completely wonderful. People are able to, to speak to their families, but I mean, you're in, you know, even still then you're in war zones, things, aren't sure that the Mo the majority of the quote power that you're using to keep internet is going to be for, you know, I'm sorry, but it's not for FaceTiming back home. 

0  

00:50:28

You know, you, you know, you have certain things that have to be done during those times, and yeah, it's not even now, I mean, it's not a hundred percent reliable, but it it's a little better. 

1  

00:50:41

Yes. I mean, you were just waiting on, on letters that, you know, back then, and, and, and then way back at the time that we're talking, I mean, you were lucky to get a letter. 

0  

00:50:51

I mean, imagine that you're like, this is where this needs to go. Maybe it'll get there. You have no way of knowing if it's going to make it there or not. It's, it's, it's crazy. 

1  

00:51:02

So, Kenji, I just want, I just want to, that it is very, it's amazing, amazing 

0  

00:51:09

Sue. We are going to go into one more ship before we get to the USS super VA. And that is the USS wasp who I like it. It was 117 foot sloop of war, which we discussed what a sloop was before. It was a smaller boat. So it wasn't as large as you know, some of the others, it weighed 509 tons. It was built in Newburgh and Newburyport, Massachusetts. After a battle, the crew captured that H M S Atalanta, Atlanta, not Atlanta and headed towards Savannah, Georgia. 

0  

00:51:51

The Atalanta separated from the loss on September 22nd, 1814. The Atalanta reached Savannah by November, and the wasp did not make it September 22nd was the last official American sighting of the ship at the beginning of 1815, several papers reported seeing the wasp. And there was a rumor that it had been captured by the British. This was not true. And once the war of 18, 12 ended, it was clear, the ship was not returning, and it was lost because there were records as to what ships were captured by who, and, you know, it was made clear that it was not called. 

0  

00:52:32

Could 

1  

00:52:32

You imagine his family's holding out that hope? I know. 

0  

00:52:37

And then there's this part too. Several years later in 1825, a news article stated the wasps had been taken by Barbary pirates off the coast of Africa. There were more rumors, but this time survivors of a shipwreck showed up on the coast of Africa. This was never proven. And in a book written by Theodore Roosevelt titled the Naval war of 18, 12 said, quote, how she perished. None ever knew all that is certain is that she was never seen again. You can probably guess what I'm going to say next, as of this recording, it has never been found. 

0  

00:53:19

I just want to make that clear because if for some off chance raising form, now, somehow it's found, I don't want people to be like it was found well, as of right now, it has not been cabin and it's been over 200 years. So not real sure if it's going to be, they could. So we'll see now onward to the USS per VA, the upper VA was built in 1813 in Rochester, England for the Royal Navy. It was 389 times. So it was not large at all. It had a hundred foot brig armed with 18 guns. 

0  

00:54:01

I believe in this case, the brig is being referred to as the proper noun brig, which is a two mass square rig ship with an additional GAF sail on the main mass instead of the informal noun, which is the prison on a warship. So just not to confuse people between a brick and a brick, this is the brick ship, not the place on a boat called a bridge. Why, why do we, why, why would you confuse somebody that having, I know, I don't know, because when I saw it, I was like, why would they care that there was, and then I looked and I was like, oh, that makes me, that makes that. Why, why, why do that to people? 

0  

00:54:43

And also we will refer to the upper VA as she a lot going forward, because that would, that's how it is done in a lot of research. And there's a reason that ships are considered females because early sailors were very aware of how powerful mother nature is. And they wanted to please her and honor her in some way. So all of the ships are she, the sailors believed if they did this than mother nature would guide and protect the vessel and crew. 

0  

00:55:23

So that is why all ships are female. Interesting. So in case anybody ever wondered that back to the very early times, they started all boats, ships, all of them are female. So interesting case she ever wanted to know. Now, you know, she was, again, she was well-known ship due to her career on the sea capturing American merchant ships up to April of 1814. But when she left Havana Cuba on April 29th, 1814 to go to Halifax, Nova Scotia, she was captured by, and this will be Leah's favorite ship from here on out the USS peacock favorite. 

0  

00:56:12

So just off Cape Canaveral in Florida, in which if a lot of you don't know where Cape Canaveral is the easiest best way to tell you where Cape Canaveral is, is it is semi close to Orlando Disney world. Because if you ever go to take a cruise or a ship out, you know, if you're going to leave out of, for like a Disney cruise, all of them leave from Cape Canaveral. So if you're ever wondering, that's kind of the best way to tell you semi where it is not exact, but it's, close-ish, it's in state, Florida. So close enough. Yeah. So she was then taken to Savannah to dock and put under the command of Lieutenant John Nicholson. 

0  

00:56:52

Once she was repaired and officially a part of the us Navy, she set sail to help fight against the doll of Algiers and his pirate attacks on American ships. Dada is actually spelled D E Y. And it is what the governor of Algiers was referred to up until 1830. So the dog Algiers is the governor of Algiers. Very good. The upper V8 joined in, in June of 18, 15, and fought two battles, which led to the capture of two Algerian warships. 

1  

00:57:30

Okay. Quick question. Hmm. They didn't change the name of the ship when, when they, 

0  

00:57:35

It went from the H M S a per VA to the U S 

1  

00:57:38

S okay. So they, they just changed the beginning. 

0  

00:57:41

And with the, with the insurgent, they did the same thing. It was like Ellen <inaudible> and it was the H M S and then when the U S took it, that's where it goes from up her VA to a pervy air because we're English. So that's just 

1  

00:57:58

What you, no, it didn't completely change 

0  

00:58:00

It. A lot of them that were taken during that time, they, it was easier and cheaper for them to just change it from HMS to USS. Yeah. 

1  

00:58:10

White, my shelter dogs who are adorable and just a lot at the same time, you know, new life, new names. Yes. Like Gator and Alfie. No, their names are Leonard in Sheldon. You liked the name, 

0  

00:58:23

So they, yes. So the appropriate did not change its name. Okay. I'm just curious about that. So the dog vowels years agreed to quote, does I put this in quotes, Sue for peace, which is an act by a warring party to initiate peace proceedings. So it's basically the white flag that is a Sue for peace as a white flag of, Hey, we're going to initiate peace proceedings from here forward. The USS Epervier was given the task of taking the peace treaty and the flags captured during the battle back to the United States, there was a crew of 132 sailors, two Marines, and three Naval officers, the ship past the Strait of Gibraltar on July 14th, 1815. 

0  

00:59:14

And she was never seen again, some people say they thought they saw her near Charleston, South Carolina on August 9th, but it's been reported that it was likely the act of Gale force winds that took out the ship. But is that really what happened to her then The Bermuda Triangle also known as the devil's triangle, the Limbo of the Lost, or the Hoodoo of the sea, the who do of this? I really liked that one. I also like limbo of the law. 

0  

00:59:56

I like all the names for it. Like limbo of the lost, the devil's triangle. It's just, they all sound so like, they all sound so mysterious, but it's a section of the Atlantic ocean, roughly outlined about the areas of Miami to Bermuda and to Puerto Rico. So that's why we're going over this this week guys. Cause technically within like the U S boundaries of C The Bermuda triangles, mostly in it, because, you know, Puerto Rico is a us territory and it goes from Miami and Puerto Rico to Bermuda a friend from Puerto Rico. And she is fabulous. You have a friend from Puerto Rico. She one of my favorite people. She's wonderful. So I tried to finding out the exact number of vessels, whether VOC or air who have gone missing in the triangle, and there isn't an exact number, but a minimum of 50 ships and 20 planes have disappeared in the area without a trace that is at a minimum that I could find that people were actually willing to report and we'll get into why that could be a larger issue. 

0  

01:01:09

The United States government, which here's issue. Number one, does not recognize The Bermuda Triangle as a location or a geographical threat. So what could The Bermuda Triangle be? What makes the Remuda triangle so mysterious? Well, our lovely website from 38 gave us a nice list of things to go off of. And these are the theories. Some of this, they do make a lot of sense. Some of them complete nonsense. I'll let you decide not you Leah collective the listener. 

0  

01:01:53

First up, you have methane gas, which is a colorless odorless gas that occurs in nature. This is what you know, comes off of gas, ovens, water, heaters, automobiles, those different kinds of things. You're going to have methane gas that comes off of them. Researchers at Arctic university of Norway had found massive under water craters off the coast of Norway, which considered quote, probably a cause of enormous blow outs of gas. It is probable that ships could suddenly sink if the water turned into foam, oh dear. 

0  

01:02:36

The theory wasn't actually presented until 1981, when geochem assists, Richard MacGyver found this connection and said that natural methane gas formed out of decomposed, organic debris can get trapped inside a nose, a lot of science guys, but it can get trapped inside of methane hydrates, which is the sediment and the deeper ocean floor. These hydrates are mostly in permafrost areas. So once they get to the lower portions of the ocean, where it gets colder, that's where these are likely to be formed. The temperature and pressure below the bottom of the sea is conductive and can turn methane gas into IC Crystal's landslides in the sea floor can break and quickly sink due to the methane, which can reduce the density of the water, which would then make the water turn to foam. 

0  

01:03:40

Well, I mean, his 

1  

01:03:41

Name is MacGyver. 

0  

01:03:42

So Iver, not Miguel 

1  

01:03:45

Or I'm like, well, number one, that gives him a lot of credibility, Crip credit T in my book, 

0  

01:03:53

I'm just saying 

1  

01:03:53

Mick Iver. Okay. So not as much credibility, 

0  

01:03:56

But yes. So what are you saying is that these icy crystals underneath so like you take the rug out from underneath them and a landslide occurs underneath the water, which would then release methane gases. And once, I mean, like you've seen how foam can come to the top of the ocean with just a lot of boats coming through and things like that. So this is a massive amount of foam. It is coming to the top. So imagine for a moment, sailing on a boat on the water, and then from the sea, you unknowingly transition into seafoam. 

0  

01:04:37

Well foam isn't buoyant like water, and it deteriorates quickly when touched by outside mass. So I'm never getting on a boat again. When the foam is gone, the water then envelops the area where the foam was located. So if this ship falls into a sea, we'll call it a sea valley. And then that valley is filled with water. The ship will automatically sync. Yeah, because it's coming in from the top and it's, you know, it's just like, it's a valley. It's filling back up with water. 

1  

01:05:14

So husband gets wish we don't have to go on a cruise. 

0  

01:05:20

So, well, there hasn't been a cruise ship that's gone missing in The Bermuda Triangle. So who knows what's my luck. The next there's look, there are much larger things than seafoam to worry yourself about in this area, such as a wormhole. Gosh. So there is a wormhole theory from the science fiction community that says there is a space time shortcut that can allow for time travel. And the ship is sucked into the wormhole. There is no proof yet that wormholes exist, but it would make sense as to why some of the boats are never found because they don't, they're not found again like, and you can search that area, but the boats are never found. 

0  

01:06:10

So why wouldn't they be found? It's very weird. Then we have water spouts, which are real and terrifying because it's basically a tornado in the ocean. Unlike wormholes water spouts have been seen and they suck water up from the ocean, hundreds to thousands of feet into the air. The Gulf stream is a current that runs right along the edge of The Bermuda Triangle and up the Eastern coast of the United States. So imagine it going from essentially the tip of Florida up the coast, right? Wouldn't 

1  

01:06:48

That be seen again, if, if they were, 

0  

01:06:50

I mean, they're, I could poke a hole in that. This is something different though. So this current can generate waves that are hundreds of feet, high, hundreds of feet, high four waves. So they are so high that if there are a low flying plane, these waves could knock the plane out of the sky. Hmm. You're not listening and listening to you. 

0  

01:07:31

It can non a plane out of the sky. You, but wouldn't 

1  

01:07:38

You find the 

0  

01:07:39

Wreckage. You may not because if a water spout is out there and one of these high waves catches a plane, which is then caught by a water spout that is thousands of feet up into the air going, who knows where you'll never find it. You have no clue where it is, right? 

1  

01:08:00

Depending on the size of the plane too, if it's a little bitty plane, 

0  

01:08:04

There are larger planes who have gone out. They're absorbing their larger planes who have gone out there that have also gone missing, which is the 30 pieces. Not all of the time, depends on where the pieces go. It depends on how, I mean, you've seen houses when they go through a tornado. So imagine water being in that tornado, that's also destroying and moving things at the same time, we've seen what a tornado can do. And that's just on land. I CA I mean, it we've seen what a hurricane can do, and this is something completely different that we've never seen like on land. 

0  

01:08:44

So there's no telling what it'll do out there, but the edge of The Bermuda Triangle is a perfect formulation to where these waves can get that high. And you have water spouts that can be common in the area to carry it away. So lots of, lots of issues. It makes more 

1  

01:09:04

Sense than to have a wormhole. 

0  

01:09:07

I don't know. This one makes sense too, that 

1  

01:09:09

That's some Hoodoo right there. Now. 

0  

01:09:11

I don't know. I'm just saying, it's very weird that you can't find anything and there's no proof yet that wormholes don't exist. I'm just saying Stephen Hawking had definitive proof that there were wormholes out in the, I mean, I'm just saying there is, there is scientific research that has backing to it. Next we are onto electromagnetic forces of the earth. The triangle is one of the few places on earth that Compass's cannot easily find true north. 

1  

01:09:42

I have heard 

0  

01:09:43

That. So with pilots and sailors, depending on instruments, to keep them, you know, on track, this can be a major issue and it can prevent them from knowing which direction they are going. And you could get turned around. Imagine you're flying. You don't really have a whole lot to go off of, or you're sailing. You don't have a lot, you know, you don't, you're not flying over, you know, a mass of, of earth where you can say, okay, we're over this area right now. You're just over the ocean. So you get caught. You don't really know which way is up, which way is north south. And you kind of get turned around. 

1  

01:10:23

Do we know if more have been lost during day or night? 

0  

01:10:28

There's not any because there's not any true. No, one's willing to say how much of have gone missing there. And because we don't know, there is some proof as to when some of them have gone missing. Some of them have been more towards dusk hours that I have found, but there's so many that are out there. It's not really known as to when they went missing because they lose communication. And then because of those electromagnetic forces, they'll lose communication. And they don't know exactly when the ship or a plane went down after that because there's no communication to be had even the recent ish. 

1  

01:11:08

Well, the reason I ask is because, I mean, I'm knowing, I know I'm going back to a cartoon, but this is the, they actually do it, you know, in Milana, they use their hands to guide them with the stars. And so, you know, you don't have to have a compass for that. So I would, you know, I wouldn't just wonder if it's more daytime that people get lost because they don't have the star. So it's just a thought how 

0  

01:11:33

Ever think of this as well? This area much like we have now is a high traffic area for hurricanes and things like that. This is true. Most of the time, you're going to have more cloudy conditions than you are going to have clear conditions. Whereas in areas you know, of Hawaii or in more tropical areas, you are going to have a more clear vision of the sky. So there's that too. 

1  

01:11:59

I'm just, you know, it, my thoughts out there, it 

0  

01:12:02

Could be just human error. I find that that's a lot of human error, but the triangle is known to have many islands that can all look alike. If you are not paying attention, it's not that there's like, oh, there's, you know, this very, very large island over here. And then there's this it's they all kind of look the same. So you can't really tell where you're going. Either. The best example of this is from 1945, when five torpedo bombers went missing under the leadership of Lieutenant Charles Taylor, he was believed to be hung over. 

0  

01:12:50

And he had previously lost his way before and had gotten off of course and different times. How about 

1  

01:13:00

Don't drink when you, or, I mean, don't get drunk just, you know, but especially if you're, you know, gonna be leadings and people on, you know, mission, 

0  

01:13:11

They've never been found, none of them stay sober. So then, 

1  

01:13:20

I mean, I'm sorry that people got lost. I am but say sober. 

0  

01:13:24

Well, I mean, and there's not really time. I mean, he wasn't drunk. I mean, he was hung over, which still isn't great. But I mean, who knows? I personally, I would not put someone in charge of a group of people who had gotten off course before on different occasions. 

1  

01:13:41

It's, that's what I'm saying. That's what I'm saying. 

0  

01:13:44

It's possible. There's not a mystery at all. And that this is more of an, a lot of people may know what this is, but it's more of the Mandela effect. And it's one of those things that people talk about and the story just kind of grows. Sure. You know, the triangle is a high traffic area for pilots and sailors. And just by the law of averages, it's not inconceivable that people crash to my point though, where did they go? Why can you not find them? And if we have so many different ways of tracking, why is The Bermuda Triangle still being blamed for some people going missing? 

0  

01:14:33

And we can't find them. It doesn't make sense to me. I just, I would think that if you have a high traffic area where it said that a lot of people have gone missing and people go missing in that high traffic area, you would be able to at least try to find them. Or maybe 

1  

01:14:50

He not take that route anymore ticket, just make it not a high traffic high. Yeah. Saying I'm not trying to go the long way around. So 

0  

01:15:01

We have one last explanation to get to, 

1  

01:15:05

Am I going to like it 

0  

01:15:07

Aliens? Oh, 

1  

01:15:09

Mohs stars. 

0  

01:15:13

We don't really need any further explanation on that. That is just in, that is the last theory of The Bermuda Triangle. Is that aliens it's yes. So keep in mind. So I told Leah about this Amazon documentary I'll watch and mess me up. I don't know the name of it. I don't want to think about it right now. I mentally cannot put my mind there again. I don't like when things are too logical that anyways, it was a problem. I was researching this, this as I was watching that. So I'm watching that and I'm researching this and I'm like, I can't handle, I can't handle this right now. 

0  

01:15:54

Counted it to me. This is too much. Hey, a lot of it's very weird. Anyways. Also, like I said, 

1  

01:16:01

She was my weird friend, but her weirdness was part of her two 

0  

01:16:05

Guys though. It ma it it's it's, it's too weird. Anyway, that's part of why I love it. But Leah makes me sound like a wackadoo. It's one of 

1  

01:16:16

Those that she's not a lack of days. 

0  

01:16:18

It is. It was something that makes too much sense when it was laid out in this way to not be true. And it did not necessarily have to do with aliens. It just dealt with technology. And why technology? 

1  

01:16:33

A lot of things that you said did make sense. Explanations were very good. And I will say that it's very scary, 

0  

01:16:41

But I was watching that as I was working on this, 

1  

01:16:45

Not necessarily explaining aliens, 

0  

01:16:48

It was explaining a lot of different things of like why people might have thought that they've seen UFO's and it was, it was anyways, it was very different. Just 

1  

01:16:57

See, I don't think I'm believing that there are aliens. 

0  

01:17:00

No, we're not saying that. We're just saying, I mean, like, who really knows? 

1  

01:17:04

I just wanted to be clear on that. So 

0  

01:17:07

As for the USS purvey, it's unknown, whatever happened to her, but she was most likely lost in this area. The massive crew and the ship had never been recovered. There is some sad, it is very sad. This is a large crew that was on that ship. So there is some misinformation about the upper VA that I want to go ahead and make sure that if you do go look at any sources, we, I go ahead and get rid of some of these thoughts. Some will say that she was carrying the peace proposals for the war of 18, 12, and due to her going missing the end of the war didn't occur until much later. This is not the case as we discussed before, because it was the treaty with the day of Algiers that she was carrying, not the treaty for the war of 18, 12, but some people will give some, and there are a lot of sites that give that misinformation, but she was not the one that was actually carrying that because those peace proposals that did make it to the United States. 

0  

01:18:10

So why would she have them if she went missing? It doesn't make sense, right? So I know this is, you know, a little different than what we've done before, but disappearance and mysteries are fun. And we haven't talked about the U S Navy a lot. So I thought that would be, that would be a good one. So last, last couple of things. And we 

1  

01:18:33

Appreciate all of our military do very much for the sacrifices that you have made. And, and the families, 

0  

01:18:40

Because we both come from, we both come from families who have been in the military. Lias is more Navy. Mine is air force. So, you know, we definitely understand how, you know, how that works and we get difficult. It can be, yes, we do. So last two tidbits of information, one, not knowing how it yields reproduce. 

1  

01:19:10

So if you didn't know place in 

0  

01:19:13

Kayla, there is a theory. I trust me, I have watched videos on it. No one has any clear answers, be somebody 

1  

01:19:19

That does Kayla, 

0  

01:19:20

Have you met my boyfriend? He's going to find out if there's an answer and we, I researched it up and down. There's a lot of different things. Anyways. One of the theories of how eels reproduce is that most eels come from The Bermuda Triangle. Oh my gosh. And that's just really just one answer for it. They don't really know how it happens, but it got come for the 

1  

01:19:45

Warm hole. They're really 

0  

01:19:46

Worms. Now heals don't have reproductive organs, which is why this is an issue anyways. Where are they coming from? 

1  

01:19:55

Like cotton. I joke. 

0  

01:19:57

I don't know. It's very, it's very scary. So last thing, tidbit to put in relating to Aaron Burr, sir, his daughter Theodosia bur Allston, boarded, a boat named the Patriot in 1812. And she was never seen again, the Patriot did sink in January of 1813, and it is known where it sank. So it is not one that has gone missing or, you know, they're not really sure what happened to it. It's very clear where it sank and what happened. There were no survivors, but, but it did dock at some point. 

0  

01:20:39

And it was never made clear if she de boarded or if she was still on the boat when it sank. Oh, so maybe she wanted to disappear. Cause she didn't, she was tired of being slain stability. Mm. I mean, I wouldn't blame her. I wouldn't either. I mean, I mean that sad, one thing that I was thinking, like we said, we did see Hamilton. And one thing that I was thinking while we were watching it is, you know, Hamilton and Burr, they were at odds with each other most of their life, but we've discussed in our, in our part to, on the duel and Weehawken to the emperor was very, very intelligent. He was very bright. He was one of the youngest people to ever go to Princeton college and graduate. 

0  

01:21:23

He came, you know, he came from a really good background and it's like, it's like one of those things where people like, they, I hate to say it this way, but this is the best way that I can, I can say it. And a lot of people understand what I mean, if they were like me in high school, a lot of people, they, they show, you know, we trying to just say this, the popular kids in high school do not always stay the popular kids later on in life. They keep in school. So a lot of <inaudible> God, and we do have a lot of listeners who are younger. 

0  

01:22:05

And so not to be like, you know, we know more like, cause I, that annoys me so bad, but, but it is a true, it is true that when the people who typically are the more popular kids in high school, or it's not always the case, but there are some that they peak in high school. And after high school, you know, high school was a great time for them. And after they just kind of don't do a whole lot else, they just kind of, you know, typically they stay away in high school. They're the ones. I mean, they're the ones that are real big and to go in there to their reunion. 

0  

01:22:46

Like they, you know, they're the ones that plan it. They're the ones that, Hey, now I planned, you went to a very small high school. There's a big school. I went to a very large high school. We had a pretty close group. Yeah, we did not. And I think Aaron Burr peaked in high school. And I think Hamilton was the one who kept his head down and then started to do more after. And so it's kinda like they hit like an X, like burst started at the top. Hamilton was at the bottom. And then at some point they kind of crossed paths and then Hamilton can, like you said, in the thing, like Hamilton continued to rise and Berge just kind of slowly kept going down. 

0  

01:23:36

But I also think 

1  

01:23:37

That bird felt like he had so much that he was supposed to do because his PA he felt like his parents expected that of him. And because they weren't there, he had to prove that he could do what his parents expected of him because they weren't there. I feel like he had that chip on his shoulder that he placed there himself. 

0  

01:24:00

I don't think so. I feel like that was Aaron Burr's parents died too young for him to remember anything about them. 

1  

01:24:08

But I think he placed that on his own Shimer because he was told that about his parents is what I'm saying 

0  

01:24:14

From everything that I read and researched about him. It seems as though the chip on his shoulder came from being placed with the uncle who was abusive and that he felt as though he had to rise above that situation in his life, because he did, he did not know his father's death. His father died before he was one. Then his mom has grandfather. And like, you know, all of that, they all died within the same year of one another. And he never really knew who they were. It seems that yes, he possibly put unrealistic expectations on himself. I think what is likely is that he accomplished too much at a young age and he was always chasing after the next thing he was supposed to do. 

1  

01:25:06

It's very possible just to continue to keep doing more and more and better and better just to show that he could. 

0  

01:25:14

I agree. I think that's a possibility. I think he thought that there was a, you know, there's like those people that are always, they're always chasing after the next big thing for themselves. There, they are 

1  

01:25:24

Never satisfied, 

0  

01:25:25

Never. And so, you know, just a lot of interesting things that go on with that. So that's our case this week of The Disappearance of the USS Epervier and how she went missing most likely in The Bermuda Triangle and what could have also happened with all of, you know, the other things that went missing there, who knows what it is. We will eventually know one day maybe before the earth just cracks, open and swallows this whole. Wow. I mean, I do 

1  

01:25:56

Not like if, 

0  

01:25:57

If we're not nice to the earth, she, she might, we don't know what she's capable of. Not like that, that you don't know. I don't know the future. So that's that. And hopefully I'll appreciate it. Hopefully I'll got to learn a little bit more about the us Navy and how it got its start. Like I said, we didn't go through all of it cause we don't have the time. So, you know, that's that hasn't enjoyed it. I have not liked it. As we said at the top, leave us a five star review. You will get a nice sticker from us. We would greatly appreciate it. And we have a website where you can find any and all Owen, you see information, your heart desires. 

0  

01:26:43

It's One Nation Under Crime dot com. We are One Nation Under Crime on Facebook and Instagram. We're not real active on Facebook to be honest guys, or way more active on Instagram and Twitter. So go there really, if you want, you know, want to see the most from us, if you love our podcast, as much as we do, please follow us and recommend us to your friends, family, strangers, aliens, who knows ghost, whoever you want to speak with. If you have, if you have an email that is a friend of yours, let them know, like we need to spread awareness of the ill population and this stem how they reproduce, because it really bothers K. This could be, this could be a really good way for us to find out, leave us a five-star review. 

0  

01:27:27

As I said before, anywhere that you find them, but really mostly guys, please, please, please go to apple podcasts. That's for some weird reason, that's like the one place that a lot of people pull analytics from them in Spotify. So just go do that. If you could, for us, we do have a Patrion. If you would like to help with the cost of making and hosting the show. We thank you guys so much for joining us again for another fun-filled week of One Nation Under Crime, we will see you here. Same time, different crime next week. And remember there isn't always Liberty and justice for all. 

0  

01:28:07

We will see you guys again next week. Get baggy. Hi.