Oct. 18, 2021

1821: The Wrongful Murder of Accused Witch, Kau-Qua-Tau


What is a witch? Are they really the much different from some of the religions we know today? The real question of the week is... could Leah a be witch? Kayla probably is, tbh.

Spooky season continues as the ONUC gals dig deep into what makes a witch, Kayla reads a cautionary, traditional Choctaw witch tale, and they discuss the wrongful murder of Seneca native, Kau-Qua-Tau.
 
Trigger Warning Level: Low

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Sources: NPS.gov, The Woodsman Journal Online, Executed Today, and The University of Pennsylvania

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Transcript

You are listening to one nation under crime, a chronological true crime podcast. Each week we go through our nation's history and discuss one case from each year, starting in 1800. I'm Kayla and I'm Leah and we're to episode 23, 23, we're in spooky season. Still, as we discussed last week, we love spooky season. We do. And I 

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00:00:32

Liked the decorations. Well, I like, like the cost seems and the decorations, I don't like scary babies and stuff. 

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00:00:43

I like, well, I don't really like scary movies. I just like spooky season is your, I like scary things. I like go. So like, stuff like that. So, and this week is another spooky season case that was unintentional, but we love it. This episode comes out on October 18th. So we are just inching our way closer to the spooky hope you guys have been able to do some fun things. This October last October was the dreaded October of 2020. And so we didn't really get to do a whole lot last October. So hopefully you guys can get out and do something fun this year. 

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00:01:23

I'm sure ghost Tobar is still going on on the travel channel. And if you would like to discuss shows such as the most terrifying places on earth, let me know. And I will gladly discuss those things with you. I love watching those shows. It's so much fun. And I think that does it for us. As far as things coming up this week, we've got an interesting case this week and we are going to discuss some spooky things yet again, last week we discussed ghosts and Linea Fisher and discuss 

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00:01:57

Playing more bones. I just, I don't understand. I just don't understand true, 

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00:02:06

But, and I are still drinking apple cider mimosas. They are delicious again, if you would like to just get a bottle of champagne and a thing of apple cider, go to town, 

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00:02:17

I still don't have that caramel vodka because somebody decided to 

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00:02:21

And an extra recording, we will do it. That'll be our Halloween episode. It'll be delicious. 

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00:02:25

Somebody just, you know, D and doesn't share things with friends. 

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00:02:30

I shared apple cider and I shared champagne 

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00:02:35

Champagne. Or was it just like 

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00:02:37

Sparkling? No shit for sure. Champagne. I, you should know that well. Okay. So this week, our sources are nps.gov. The woodsman's journal online executed today.com and the university of Pennsylvania's website in 

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00:02:57

Brad continues to add to his list 

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00:02:59

Sites that Kayla is. Brad has got a real issue with my, with my searches. So we, this week are going to be discussing Tommy Jimmy, wait, wait, Tommy, Jimmy like J E M M Y yes. Two first names. J E M M Y. Yes. And <inaudible>, I believe that's how you say her name. I could not find an actual phonetic spelling. There she is. She is of the Seneca nation. And so we're going to discuss them this week. But before we get into that, let's get into our events of 1821. 

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00:03:40

On February 9th, the George Washington university was chartered as the Colombian college of the district of Columbia by president James Monroe and George Washington university is still in DC today. February 23rd of the college of apothecaries was organized in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It is the first pharmacy college in the United States. Everything starts in Philadelphia. It's crazy, March 5th, west Philadelphia, born and raised. There. Wasn't a playground that I'm aware of. So March 5th, James mean row and you're welcome. 

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00:04:22

And Daniel D. Thompson began their second terms as president and vice president of the United States, May 30th, James Boyd patented the rubber fire hose. So that's important May 31st, the cathedral of assumption of blessing Virgin Mary was dedicated in Baltimore, Maryland. And is the first Catholic cathedral in the United States. It's a very long name. It is. It's like, oh, what was that? I don't remember what it was. Our lady of perpetual sorrow. That's all I can remember from like one show that I watched that they said that was like the name of the thing that they went to like a school or something. 

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00:05:06

Anyway, June 27th, the new Hampton school is founded in the state of New Hampshire, July 10th. The United States took possession of the newly bought territory of Florida from Spain or Florida or Florida, August 4th, the Saturday evening post is relaunched. It took like about a two or three-year hiatus. August 10th, Missouri was admitted as the 24th state September 1st, the first colonies were established along the Santa Fe trail, September 3rd, the 1821 Norfolk and long island. 

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00:05:48

Hurricane struck New York city, September 18th Amhurst college was founded in Massachusetts and December 17, Kentucky abolished debtors' prisons, which essentially were prisons for people who couldn't pay their debts. And that was birth send 1821 on January 2nd, we have Napoleon LeBron. He was an American architect known for several notable Philadelphia churches, such as St. Augustine's church on fourth street, cathedral, Basilica of Saint of saints, Peter and Paul on Logan square. 

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00:06:37

He's a Capricorn October 22nd spooky season call us Potter was an American industrialist and railway magnet who invested in the central Pacific railroad, not specific, but he's a Libra. And December 25th, that's Christmas Clara Barton was born. We discussed her and our episode of the Parrington massacre. She is a humanitarian and founder of the American red cross. She is cousins with Martha Ballard, who he discussed in that case. And she is a Capricorn. 

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00:07:19

She did great things, good community, humanitarian and human and human. I mean, maybe we don't know the deaths in 1821. We have Elizabeth Ann Sutton. She's the first person born in the United States to be canonized by the Catholic church. So she is actually a Saint. She established the first Catholic girls school in the nation and Emmitsburg, Maryland, and founded the first American congregation of religious sisters. The sisters of charity, March 13th, wait, sill, Avery, lawyer, and soldier who fought a duel with Andrew Jackson died. 

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00:08:05

He did not die due to the dual with Andrew dice, October 11th, John Ross key say judge, lawyer and father of Francis Scott Key, who wrote the star Spangled banner. He died. So May 2nd, 1821, his birthday different year. Look it there. I would hope it'd be 200 years old. I'm just kidding. Tommy, Jimmy, as chief of the cynic hit native American nation killed. I believe it's calc boss Howell who was condemned as a, she set. 

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00:08:51

She turned me into this week are off to Buffalo. New York. Buffalo is the second largest city in the state of New York. It is located at the Eastern end of lake Erie, right beside the Canadian border and at the head of the Niagara river, 

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00:09:13

Never been to Niagara falls and 

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00:09:15

To go, I've never been either. Don't know if I really want to go. 

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00:09:20

We were choosing between that. That was one of the places we spitball choosing 20th anniversary 

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00:09:28

Disney one. Well, I would think the region was originally inhabited by the neutral Erie era, coy and Sinica nations in 1825. When the Erie canal was being planned, Buffalo was chosen as the end point of the canal. The canal was a game changer for Buffalo and grew the city considerably considering it was the primary inland port between the great lakes and the Atlantic ocean. Transshipment made it possible for Buffalo to be the world's largest grain port trans-shipment is the shipment of goods to an intermediate destination, and then taking them to a secondary location. 

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00:10:15

If you're ever kidnapped, do not get transshipped. I mean, cause you have a choice. Well, I'm saying I'm just anytime I, anytime I think of taking something to a secondary location, I always think about when they people talk about like, if you ever get kidnapped, don't ever let them take you to a second location because she'll be killed anyways. The things I think about it shouldn't surprise anyone. It wasn't your 

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00:10:45

Second, your, your wouldn't 

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00:10:46

Your bud in it is it wasn't long until the popularity of railroads overshadowed, the canals and Buffalo became the largest railway hub. After Chicago, Chicago never be the city. There is seen Chicago and think chick ago 

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00:11:06

On our way to Savannah. So Cherokee and say 

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00:11:10

<inaudible>, I mean, chick ago, is that better like that? Mary go never to be the city to not be a part of industrialization, Buffalo transitions to the manufacturing business and became dominated by steel production. Much like Birmingham. Our fair city is known as the steel capital of the south. So also we were discussing Peaky blinders earlier. Anyways, Peaky blinders is in Birmingham like Angouleme England. Yes, Birmingham. Yeah. So it's really funny when you watch it and they say it because I'm like that's it's Birmingham, Birmingham. 

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00:11:55

It's how they always say it. I'm like it's Birmingham. It's Birmingham. Anyways, if you watch Peaky blinders, you know who Arthur is? I'm in season two right now and God love Arthur. That's all I can say. Love Tommy though. Anyways. And for any of those of you who do watch Peaky blinders, I'm going to go ahead and blow your mind. If you also looked at Tommy and thought, God, Tommy looks so familiar. He's the scarecrow in the Batman movies, just FYI. You'll never see him the same again. I love Tommy back to Buffalo and chick ago, Buffalo has its share of cultural city icons, including the oldest urban park system in the United States. 

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00:12:41

Nice Fred Fred Orrick law Olmsted. I'm going to take 

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00:12:47

Your mimosa from you. 

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00:12:50

I'm not here. Anyways. 

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00:12:53

Frederick Frederick 

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00:12:55

Law Olmsted, who was known as the father of American landscape architecture described Buffalo as being quote the best planned city in the United States. If not the world. 

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00:13:09

Interesting. 

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00:13:10

He's probably biased considering he designed it. You know, fun fact, those of you may not know mindedly as college campus was designed by the same people who designs New York central park. 

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00:13:25

It's going to bring that up to 

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00:13:29

Just in case y'all ever wondered our campus away. Emphasis very beautiful. 

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00:13:33

It really does. It really is. I mean, and have you ever, I mean, have you really been to our, our university, if you haven't tripped on a brick? I mean, 

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00:13:44

That's how he was always. So the funny thing is at the college that we went to the way that you always know who the freshmen are, are the ones who were always tripping on bricks because it's one of the few places that still has like brick roads, like actual brick. And some of them are so old, they've been slowly redoing some of them, but some of them are so old that like, you know, trees have grown under them and they've kind of popped up here and there. And it's just so funny. Cause you can always tell who the freshmen are. Especially like when sororities and stuff are starting. Cause they're all trying to like really dress up and look and it's like, you always see people just tripping left and right. And it's like, oh, you're new here. 

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00:14:25

No, 

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00:14:25

I had to dress up to go to work. So I mean, I couldn't help it cause there wasn't changing before go into work. I mean it just, it just had to happen. 

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00:14:36

That's so funny, but yes, if you've not, you've never been to our college. If you've not tripped on a brick that's our college campus also has several ghost stories. I did a ghost campus tour of our college for our college newspapers. It does. One of the main buildings on campus is haunted. And anyways, I have to talk about that one. I wonder when our college was founded anyways, it was a girl's school. So it wasn't all girls. So anyways, it's interesting, interesting story of our college, but either way. Yep. But the same people who did central park. 

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00:15:17

So it's always fun. The city is also home to the Buffalo Philharmonic orchestra, the Buffalo museum of science, the university at Buffalo and Buffalo state college. There are also two major league sports teams there. The NFL team, the Buffalo bills and the NHL. For those of you don't know national hockey league Buffalo Sabres Buffalo is also given credit for the creation of Buffalo wings for our international listeners who have the misfortune of not knowing what Buffalo wings are. Buffalo wings are chicken wings sections that are deep fried and then coated in a vinegar based sauce. 

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00:15:59

Typically consists of cayenne pepper, hot sauce and melted butter. My boyfriend makes the best hot wings. They're awfulness. So are so Nassim, but I love them. We actually had Buffalo wings this week. Fun fact Publix makes the best Buffalo wings are like hot wings. Oh, they're so good. Get them in the deli section. If you live in our Publix run, don't walk. Anything. Anything in the Publix deli section is always Chile. That is the only thing that I'm making my own chili. I'm not buying out well, but I mean like, you know, you're at work, you're alive. That's true. That's true. I get that. But I wouldn't get chili. 

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00:16:39

I would get one of their other. They have a lot of other soups that are really good. Oh, they're lobster bisque. So either way, if you don't live near a Publix, if you ever see a Publix go to their deli section, get some wings. You will not regret it. I'm going to say wait. And I was like that. Ain't not have weighed there by the way. Why are you telling people to get weighed? We've got listeners in Colorado and California days. I'm I'm aware of the misfortune I have of being in Alabama. All right. Okay. Fine. But just saying their wings, wings, it's unclear who actually created the Buffalo wing because there are several people in restaurants who claim to have created them, including one story of a guy by the name of John Young who moved to Buffalo from Alabama. 

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00:17:35

I say he did it. And he began serving chicken wings served in a special tomato based sauce in 1961 because we fry everything here in Alabama. So it totally makes sense. Fun fact, John Young was inducted into the national Buffalo wing hall of fame in 2013 at the national Buffalo wing festival. Huh? So we're going to get to some of our notable residents of the city of Buffalo. And there are so many, I'm sure it has its own Wikipedia page. Wow. Page and I mean hundreds. It's ridiculous. So while this is a long list, this does not even scratch the surface of the amount of people that I had to go through to make this list. 

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00:18:22

First we have Wolf Blitzer. He is the CNN reporter and he has been since 1990 and he is the lead political anchor for CNN. We have F Scott Fitzgerald writer of the great Gatsby did not like that. It's such a great book. Hated it. Mark Twain, Tom Sawyer and huckleberry Finn. The GooGoo dolls. Everyone should know the Googles are, if you don't know the song, slide such a good song. And if you know what the song is about makes it real depressing. It's one of those songs in the nineties where like everybody kind of saying it, but nobody really knew what it was talking about. Then you find out later on and you go, oh, oh, it's about a girl that gets pregnant. 

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00:19:09

And her boyfriend is trying to convince her to run away with him instead of doing what her parents want her to do anyway. So she gets on her mom's or found me what you feel is what you do was beautiful. Oh, I want to get married anyways right away. Such a good song. Google dolls. And Google's the Barenaked ladies and Hootie and the Blowfish are up there as just, just all times such good. Such good. Gotta love. Kettle of hoody, whole Derrius Rutger. 

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00:19:50

Very distinctive voice. Yes. Such good songs. Nineties music. Anyways, William G Fargo and Henry Wells. Co-founders of not only Wells Fargo, but American express Muncha Richman. I can tell you that George, a Hormel of the Hormel foods company, Chile, I believe this is how you say this guy's last name. Don't come for me. Pretty. Leah might actually know who he is. I'm not sure he's an actor. His name is David and I believe it's Barney anus. 

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00:20:31

Borney Anna's angel C Seeley booth from bones. And he was on angel and he and Buffy and yes, all of those him that's when they had to say it. I, I, when I look at it, I can't say it for Yannis. There you go. So him, he is from Buffalo. 

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00:20:56

I can tell you something. God's didn't some, some extra time when he was putting him together and he did very nice work. He, he did a 

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00:21:06

Very good face, like a 

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00:21:09

Very good, nice everything. Leah, 

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00:21:14

Your husband might be listening to that 

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00:21:16

In front of my husband. 

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00:21:18

Yes. Like me and my boyfriend talking about Tommy. 

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00:21:22

He knows my feeling for him. I'm sorry. He's very attractive. When he was booth on burns. And he had that, that cell, that, that belt buckle that said coffee. I was like, yes. I mean all of it. The whole package. Yes I am here for 

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00:21:41

We'll see if you remember who this one is too. His name's William Fincher. He's an actor. You might know him as Colonel Willie Sharp and Armageddon. Captain can hour in the most recent longest yard Alexander Mahoen and prison break. He is also from the perfect storm and black Hawk down. 

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00:22:00

Vaguely. 

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00:22:01

You will know this next one. Thanks to me. Marc, Evan Jackson. He is husband Kevin from Brooklyn nine nine. 

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00:22:11

And 

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00:22:14

I introduce lead at Brooklyn nine, nine. That is a good show. I love I use 

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00:22:19

Asset <inaudible> 

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00:22:22

I use, I use gifts of, I use too many Brooklyn nine, nine gifts, especially as a captain, I always use his means or the one he's like I am ecstatic. Can you not tell I'm like yeah. 

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00:22:47

And being pot pot is 

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00:22:48

Hilarious. Such a good show. Great shit, Chad, Michael Murray. He's a key. We all love Chad Michael Murray. If you don't know who he is, which you should. He is Lucas Scott and one tree hill. He was also Tristin do gray in the Gilmore girls. And he was in the movies freaky Friday and a Cinderella story. He was just basically the two thousands heartthrob that everyone needed. He was a cutie. He still is a Casey. Then let's get to some boring slash exciting. Maybe people Millard Fillmore, the 13th president of the United States, Alford, Southwick, Alfred, not the same Alford. 

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00:23:32

Just like from Batman. This Alfred invented the electric chair. Yes, yes. 

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00:23:44

And what she's 

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00:23:45

Called the one Alabama's at the yellow Mala. What is called a it's called an old Sparky and a lot of places. I don't even remember what she's called in Alabama. Okay. And then one of my favorites, Rob Gronkowski, he now plays for the N for NFL, the Tampa bay Buccaneers. He, he followed our wonderful friend, Tom Brady. My, my boyfriend might have a crush on Tom Brady as well. I have a crush on Tom Brady say he is very, he says he is. I don't know. I have questions. I love rocker and Koski. He's so cute. 

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00:24:24

He is precious. He is just, Ugh. He used to play with cam Carolina, Panthers, your spitter. And I just love you. Would you know who he is? Don't you Rob Gronkowski. He's precious. He is just so cute. He has one that I can play for now. Or you did play for the Patriots. He took his place. I don't know. I don't follow him in FL. I believe that it was an Alabama rookie. Oh, I'm sure it was. I don't doubt it. Kim's got so much money now. He doesn't really care. I don't blame him. Honestly, look, unless you're a Brady or a Manning, does it really matter what you do in the NFL? 

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00:25:13

Which Brady Brady is the only one that can go to another team, which we're going to talk sports for a second. Brady's the only one that can go to fricking Tampa bay and actually make them win anyways. But Rob Gronkowski followed him to Tampa bay. My boyfriend says that Tampa bay is becoming the retirement home of NFL players. So anyways, before we get to this week's case, we of course have to discuss a little bit of history when it comes to the thoughts that surround the case itself and the victim, regardless of who you see as the victim in this case. 

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00:25:55

And you know, I love a spooky season case. We got to talk about witchcraft she's. So just, just go on this trip with me, go in with an open mind. Cause it was very interesting looking into witchcraft. So we're going to look into the actual definition of what people say witchcraft is. That's what makes it interesting. Witchcraft is the actual practice of magic. Some specifically will say black magic, but white magic can also be per the definition of depending on the year earlier looking at well, if we go to the modern text, the definition is a religious practice involving magic and an affinity with nature. 

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00:26:39

Usually within a pagan tradition, pagan tradition can also, if you know what Sam heinous, Sam Payne is Halloween different summer solstice, different things like that. All of those are considered pagan traditions. A lot of people follow pagan traditions. So essentially by definition, you could boil witchcraft down to a religion, practiced by a group of people. If you really look at it, depending people say they're Wiccan. There's the one. Yeah. You're you can be Wiccan or you can be wicked pagan. It just depends on what you follow. 

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00:27:20

So anyways, we'll continue a group of people who believe in praying or wishing to entities that they cannot see and sacrificing or tiding to a religion that they believe in themselves. Religion. She's saying, when you boil things down to this bottom practices, people just aren't too much different from each other. When you really look at the world, just kind of one of those things, it's like, we'll continue. We'll get into it. Anyways. Another definition of witchcraft is just simply being bewitching. 

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00:28:00

I can be bewitching or fascinating, very fascinating or pushing your charm on to someone else quite charming. So essentially flirting and being a Loring to someone else is also witchcraft. So you're a witch, you're a witch. Both of us are quite charming and fascinating. It's insane. So yes, yes it is. And sometimes you can call somebody a witch, but you want to say something else, but your mama taught you not to say those words. Anyways, witchcraft is also considered to be supernatural skills or abilities through the use of rituals. 

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00:28:42

So again, looking for magic through works with the use of rituals, some people want to get real technical with it. You could say, if you say this many different things, then this is taken away or this is done for you hail Mary's. I don't know. I'm just saying you can draw a lot of parallels to a lot of different things in these societies. If we really look into the definition of these so-called witches, you can see that pagans themselves, as they follow their own religion, aren't really much different from anybody else who follows a religion. 

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00:29:29

They have their own physical beliefs. They have their own practices that they follow. They have their own, they have their own things. So it's just to me that back in this time, just because they're pagans and just because they're like, oh, the summer solstice people are like, which, oh, you think that you can cure that by eating this so-called plant, which it's like really anyways, a lot of what was going on during this time. 

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00:30:13

So let's see, essentially, if you really want to boil down witchcraft, you can just view it as the belief in something bigger than yourself, which really that's what a lot of different things are. Anyways. Even people who are agnostics, who don't really believe in one specific, greater being, anything else, it all, it all boils down to the same thing. It's just the same. It's it's like somebody who's Christian getting mad at somebody who's Catholic because they do things differently. It's like, just because of whatever. So, and native tribes there are slash were cautionary tales of witches and what they could or could not do the Choctaw tribe, which is a tribe that's actually pretty prominent. 

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00:31:06

Like in our area, we have the chalk tar. We have the Cherokee, we have Creek Cherokee yes. In our area. So, you know, the Choctaw tribe has strong beliefs of witches and the supernatural nod and the fact that they practice it, but they were very weary and superstitious when it came to anything, dealing with it. So one thing that I found, quote, the world of the Choctaws and older times also included supernatural beings that could manifest themselves as human, but were in fact creatures that were not human disasters were caused by witches and witchcraft was blamed for all sorts of adverse events, accidents, or illnesses. 

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00:31:49

Choctaws believes that the sole aim of a, which was to bring chaos disorder and destruction upon the community and that they were thought to have supernatural powers and tribes have many stories that are passed down through family members about witches and how these witches had the ability to disguise themselves when they needed to. I mean, I could describe myself, eat papers, you know, big glasses who knows. One of these stories is my hair. You do look different when you straighten your hair. One of these stories is called the Scott nee or the owl. 

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00:32:31

I would think of Scott and I would be like a snake, but whatever. It's an oral tradition passed down through generations that says along time ago, on a beautiful summer day, the children were out playing throughout the neighborhood. Then an old, old woman, they don't say of age, but whatever came up to the children and told them that she was their great, great, great grandmother. They laid out a quilt for her to sit on and they asked where their father lay. When he slept at night, they told her and they talked about many other things as well. That night, the old woman crept into the house and entered the room where the children's father slept. 

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00:33:16

<inaudible> trigger warning. She took a knife from under her apron and cut his head off. Nice. She then took his head in her basket and began to walk down the road out of the village and onto the path through the woods. After a while she met a bear who asked her, what do you have in that basket old woman to wait? The bear can talk. Yes. Oh, witchcraft. She told him that it was full of poison and that if he looked upon it, he would become blind. The bear went on his way, the days pass and the woman kept on the path through the woods. 

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00:33:59

Suddenly she was stopped by two wild cats. One of the wild cats asked, what do you have in that basket? Old woman? She told them again, it was full of poison and they would go blind. If they looked upon it ignoring the old woman, one of the wild cats grabbed the basket. So apparently these wild cats are Amper for morphic, but whatever they have thumbs, I guess. Well, if their claw could have light, they could have sent the call into the basket and like snatched it. That way. One of the Wildcats grabbed the basket from yeah. 

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00:34:39

Grabbed the basket from her and saw she had a head after seeing the head, they ran into the woods there. They decided this was the person who was killing all of the animals and people in the villages. They didn't go blond. So they plan to intercept the old woman along the path and kill her before she could kill anyone else. When they caught her, one of the wild cats went into the woods to get a club while the other ones stood guard unclear. Whether it's a club or a club, things, a little weird to bring a club there. Music could be a little too loud, but the old woman said to the Wildcat standing guard that his friend knows that if he kills me, then he will have good luck forever. 

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00:35:28

So you should not wait on him and kill me herself to have the good luck yourself. Chicky, Chicky, the wild categoried and went to go find a club himself. Weird again. You would think of dancing at a moment like this. When he turned back around, he watched as the old woman transformed herself into an owl and flew away before he got back, he realized the old woman was not a human being at all. What a wit. So it was the spring of 1821 on the Buffalo Creek reservation that a Sinica native living about three miles from the mouth of the Buffalo river, got sick and died. 

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00:36:17

A lingering death. Don't know what lingering death means. If you're dead, 

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00:36:23

Got a lingering death, like a long sickness light, it took a long time down. 

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00:36:29

That just makes it seem to me like you were dead, but you were just lingering there. Dead 

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00:36:36

Just music. It took a long time to die angered instead of just going right on off 

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00:36:43

The medicine, men of the village were confused and thought that the man's death was extremely suspicious after all he died very quickly and they weren't too sure what he was sick with in the first place 

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00:36:58

Quickly. But they said a lingering death that is C contradictory. 

0  

00:37:04

Keep in mind. This was also 1821. And medicine clearly was not at the same standard that it is today. Naturally, the assumption was that he was a victim of witchcraft, Q Salem witch trial vibes. Anyways, there was a cynic, a native woman by the name of I, again, calc with towel. I really hope that's right, who took care of the man before his death? And of course, as I already said, Allah Salem, she was immediately pointed to, as the suspect in his murder, it had to be her. It was a quote murder by witchcraft and sorcery with the aid of an evil spirit. 

0  

00:37:49

Oh, Calco towel. Wasn't blind to the consequences of being a witch as a Sinica native. And she fled her home and the entire reserve she crossed into Canada. Some might see this as a bit of an extreme, but when the consequences for witchcraft or death, I can see why you would want to run as far away as humanly possible. The heck out of Dodge. Of course her running was exactly what the tribe needed to convince everyone that she was guilty. Why would she run if she wasn't guilty, right? 

1  

00:38:23

Maybe she's terrified that you're going to kill her anyway, because how are you going to prove she is a reasonable. 

0  

00:38:28

She was hunted down and immediately found guilty and sentenced to death. But even though her fate was decided there was a problem. The Seneca council knew that if they carried out a death sentence outside of the Buffalo Creek reserve, it was going to be considered murder. If you think back to our discussion in the earlier episode about reserve laws and how authorities don't have to follow the laws on the reserve, but natives are expected to follow them when not on the reserve. That's kind of what it's all cookie. Now they had to convince Calco towel that she needed to come back to the reservation in order to make sure that she was punished for her crimes. 

0  

00:39:11

They had to kind of trick her into coming back. It was May 2nd, 1821. And the Seneca council expected that the executioner would take care of the situation once she returned take care. But when the quote which returned, this is not what happened. The chief of the Seneca tribe at the time, what did she do with Tim? Maybe no was so on on guys. But he was called Tommy Jimmy by the local Americans. He was supposedly related to the Seneca man who had died. The lingering death that was supposedly carried out by the witch. 

0  

00:39:56

Jimmy grabbed a knife and sorry, guys, trigger warning here, split the witch's throat. As soon as he laid eyes on her Omar, which killed her almost instantly. I don't know how that almost kills you instantly, but you know, who am I? So Calcutta was allegedly buried under the floor of her cabin, which stands on the grounds of what is today, lower Ebenezer cemetery above Casnovia Creek. Wait, why would you bury somebody under the floor of their cabin? Just Jimmy was placed in jail and was indicted for her murder. 

0  

00:40:40

Apparently in the tribe, you can't be murdered. Can't be arrested for murder if you were the executioner, but even the chief can be arrested for killing someone. Even if the executioner refuse to do their job, Jimmy claims that he was possessed and that's why he killed the so-called, which is possessed by Ray. But Jimmy was not referring to the type of possession that you might immediately think of. At this time. Possession was also considered an idea that someone is dominated by an extraneous passion or idea. 

0  

00:41:20

And this is exactly what Jimmy claimed once in court for his crime, Jimmy defended his murder instead of trying to deny or minimize the events that occurred Jimmy. Well, the newspaper calls him. So on on guys, I'm sorry, policy and what his actual name, which is so on on guys. This is a, he's a chief. So anyways, the local paper covered the trial and they turned it of course, into a sensation. He was arrested and thrown into the prison in the village of Buffalo. 

0  

00:42:03

On Saturday, May 5th, 1821 during his first trial, before a circuit court session held in Buffalo, which started in mid July of 1821. He never denied killing Calico tau. In fact, he pleaded not guilty because quote, the Seneca, this is an exact quote. The Seneca Indians were a sovereign and independent nation exercising exclusive jurisdiction of all offenses committed by any of its members within their own territory, since both Calco towel and sawn on guys. 

0  

00:42:43

So on. So, so on, not yet we're Seneca and both the judicial execution and the alleged witchcraft had occurred on Seneca territory. According to the chief, his legal counsel and the Seneca nation. This was not a matter for the courts of New York state. The Senecas felt that the entire issue was about their sovereignty and independence, which was guaranteed by treaties of the federal government. And that even though their territory was some was completely surrounded by New York state, they were independent from the state of New York. The jury found itself obliged to quote a very thorough examination of all the laws, treaties documents and public history relating to the Indians direct quote, which went back quite far. 

0  

00:43:38

The jury accepted the merits of Tommy, Jimmy, but they were also unwilling to rule in a manner that happened within a native reservation. What a novel idea, Jimmy was eventually set free without any punishment. And he was pardoned by the New York legislature for his actions. The court deemed that Jimmy was acting as an executioner, regardless of whether this was true or not. The Seneca tribe left the cabins and the homes in the area. And those homes were reassigned to those in a group called the Ebeneezer society. This society didn't know about the history of the cabin on the bluff. And someone moved in to calc hotels home, no, where she had done in buried underneath. 

0  

00:44:24

Since then, there are stories of people hearing strange sounds around the cabin and seeing visions that people could not explain the residents couldn't sleep. And anyone who tried to stay in the cabin overnight complained of the same issues as the residents, according to cynical legend, the spirit of calc hotel appeared one night to the Ebeneezer societies leader. Christian Metz met stated that Calco towel appeared to him bloody and bound in chains. The next day Mets had the cabin of calc hotel burned down and the clearing that remained was turned into Ebenezer cemetery. 

0  

00:45:05

Offense was erected in the left rear corner of the graveyard where the cabin is believed to have stood. And to this day, the area is still fenced off and no other graves are marked in that area. It said that no one has ever been buried in the same spot that the quote, which calc hotel rested, and it was not until September 26th, 2021. Ooh, this 

1  

00:45:34

Year 

0  

00:45:36

That a marker was finally placed at the location where Calco tower was buried in the cemetery. The west Sinica historical society said, quote, the role of the Seneca nation in our town is vital. They were the first inhabitants here, and this is a story that has some local attractions, but we want to get the story out more of this woman as a respected member of her community, we feel that she was kind of an unfortunate demise, but we want to keep her memory alive. The marker was paid through a grant from the Pommery foundations, legends and lore program. 

0  

00:46:18

And that is a story of the murder of calc hotel. The 

1  

00:46:22

That's very sad. Isn't it? Somebody under the floorboards, why would you, 

0  

00:46:32

They figured nothing was going to happen to the house. I guess they didn't think about people moving into it later. So they were like, oh, that's the witch's house nobody's going to live there. So we'll just bury her underneath it. 

1  

00:46:46

Well, 

0  

00:46:46

Maybe they didn't want to put her in a graveyard because they thought she was a witch. 

1  

00:46:50

It was the custom here. I mean, even with the tens, they buried him in the ground. They just buried him across the road with the implements. He's killed his whole family. I mean, 

0  

00:47:00

I get it. But I guess being the, which they don't know, they just buried her into house. 

1  

00:47:06

That is just weird. I mean, at least I didn't put her on display. I will say they did not put her on display. I mean, that's just weird, but I mean, you know, you know, dude was just mad and he was, he was butt hurt that his family died. 

0  

00:47:27

Well, it said that he was a, it did not say how far of a relative he was. 

1  

00:47:32

It's just mad. He wouldn't pay for his relative dying. I mean, 

0  

00:47:36

I think some people out there know what BD is. I think this dude had some, some of that going on and don't know what that means. Big energy. Okay. I think he had some of that going on and he was the chance for the tribe. And if the executioner is not on duty, but I'm just going to do it myself. There you go. 

1  

00:48:04

Bye 

0  

00:48:06

Bye. Oh, and you're going to come back. 

1  

00:48:09

Okay, sure. I'm going to take care of this. We got this. 

0  

00:48:13

Don't worry about we got it. I don't understand why. And, and, and honestly, so it wasn't included in here, but the more and more research that I did about her, she was like nursing, the man who died for the first, for the last few days of his life. Like she was there. So because she was simply there, they were like, which she called them. 

1  

00:48:36

Yeah. And it's like, 

0  

00:48:38

No, she was there helping him. And she was someone in the community that was known to like for natural remedies and you know, exactly much like all of the witches and the Salem witch draw were also healers as well. I mean, like anyways, I have feelings on that little girl from Salem, which are anyways, 

1  

00:49:01

I watch I've read and I haven't read all the books, but, and I've watched Outlander including here, the main character. She's a healer. And I know there's, there's fantastical in that. And I do love fantasy movies and stuff and books like that, you know? And, and she was accused of witchcraft, but it was because she knows medicine, you know, and, and they, if the people could, could explain it and their minds are so small, they can explain some same thing, call it. 

0  

00:49:33

Same thing happens today. I mean, there are a lot of people who prefer, like now people say they're like crunchy people. Like, you know what I mean? Like, they'll call people crunchy and it's like, okay, so that same person you would be calling a witch a hundred years ago, same person doing the same things. You're going to call them a witch. Like, 

1  

00:49:55

I mean, I have some crunchy tendency. 

0  

00:49:59

I mean, I do definitely. I mean, I collect crystals. I'm a witch. So 

1  

00:50:04

I like, I like essential oils now, which I will, I will use medications that I use, like peppermint oil. I will use peppermint oil on my stomach. My stomach is feeling yucky. I 

0  

00:50:20

Put peppermint oil in my shower. Smells 

1  

00:50:23

Good. Does, but I'll use peppermint all, all my stomach. Like if, if I have a stomach or, you know, I'll use it in a heartbeat or I take medicine. It's 

0  

00:50:32

Like, if there's something else out there, like, I, I take activated charcoal cause I have like a lot of issues. And so I'll take activated charcoal, 

1  

00:50:42

Take care of all your issues. 

0  

00:50:43

No, trust me that alcohol does that. No, but like, if like, I, I have a sensitivity to gluten. I can't have, I have Barrett syndrome. So I can't have certain things that are too spicy or like it causes major issues. And so, but activated charcoal will like soak up things in your system. So before, like years ago, before I went to Mexico, the doctor that we went to gave us some like seasick medication and stuff. But the one thing that he said was go to like your normal store and buy activated charcoal before you eat anything in Mexico. 

0  

00:51:31

That way, if it doesn't agree with you, or if you do try to get food poisoning, like the activated charcoal soaks it all up, so you don't have that problem. So I take activated charcoal and stuff like that. Like if I notice I'm not feeling like real great, I'll do that better than like taking Pepto-Bismol or anything like that. But yeah, just because you can figure out like a better option for you doesn't mean you're a wit 

1  

00:51:59

Well, and I use lavender oil. I have horrible allergies and such. 

0  

00:52:05

I've used it on burns before. Yeah, 

1  

00:52:07

Well, yeah. I use it for that. And para peppermint oil is actually good for a Bookbinder, but I'll use lavender oil to 

0  

00:52:15

Keep bugs away too 

1  

00:52:16

For allergies. And I mean, and I have different oils that I will use for things now is that to say that I won't use actual medicine? No, but 

0  

00:52:25

Well Leah's saying guys is that she's a witch and this is the episode that she comes out. 

1  

00:52:32

We've, 

0  

00:52:32

We've established, 

1  

00:52:34

I'm a Christian, which, Hey, 

0  

00:52:36

It's a serious group of people. All right. There is a group of Christian, which is you think I'm kidding guys, go Google it. There are Christian witches that are out there. I'm just saying I'm not. 

1  

00:52:45

But, but what I'm saying is I'm pagan, you know, I'm a little crunchy, but I believe in Western medicine as well. I, you know, I'm not a, I'm only going to use oils and, you know, essential oils are going to heal all of your issues. You don't need to take any medications. No. I mean, please give me the Xanax when I need this. 

0  

00:53:11

Like, there are people out there who like get cancer or they get really sick and things like that. And like food can truly heal your body. Like there's different things that you can eat and things like that. And a lot of people who will, you know, get diagnosed with cancer, they will go that route of trying to naturally do things instead of chemo or anything like that. But I mean, for some people, right, for some people, it does work for some people, it doesn't work. I mean, it's just, it's all really honestly, depending on how bad things are, but you know, in your body chemistry and what's best for your bio. I mean, there's no telling, but it's just like guys, which is so funny. 

0  

00:53:51

We were just talking about earlier, early in our, which talk about a lot of things, right. And I know this is some, for some is a controversial issue, but we were talking about like the legalization in the use of, of weed and marijuana and how there are a lot of different states that have it. And we got back into the history of, of, we were talking about how it became illegal in the first place and just different things like that. And it's funny that that became illegal around the same time that pharmaceuticals started becoming more of an emerging industry. And while, like we've said before, we totally advocate for people taking pharmaceuticals that need them, you all should, shouldn't be denied the right nor access to something else. 

0  

00:54:40

If you chose something else for yourself, that is a natural substance. Like you can, you, it, it grows. It's not like it grows in the ground. It's so does a carrot, are we going to outlaw carrots, snack, Kayla has done research is what she say. I have, I have strong issue like with certain things. Well, I just, I have an issue when there are proven cases of things working for people. And probably, I mean, honestly, which I don't know if he even knows about this. One of the biggest reasons that I did research so much about it is when I was in college, I was on the writing staff of our college paper. 

0  

00:55:27

And one of the things that I wrote about was a Charlotte's web, which Charlotte's web is a form of marijuana that you can create different types of it. And Charlotte's web was, is a strain still out there. Now that a lot of people use who have children who are autistic or they have issues, or they have, and there was a family in alabaster. And that was what I wrote about at the time alabaster is, is kind of on the outskirts of Birmingham. And there was a family in that town that it was really helping their child who had neurological issues. 

0  

00:56:09

And the state of Alabama was not approving marijuana for medical use. And so they moved to Colorado. Like they took their entire family and moved because they were like, this works for our child. And you're telling us, no, that's when I have issues. When you're saying we've tried everything, we've tried all the medications you've given us, we've gone, we've jumped through the hoops, we've done everything. This works better for us. And they're like, no, you're good. Yeah. And they just have to, you know, and that's, that's what bothers me is when you know, now there are some things, no, I don't believe you should be able to not to get into too controversial topic when it comes to this. 

0  

00:56:55

But yes, there are people who are on the Uber religious side of the spectrum who don't believe in any treatments for their children at all. Now I do agree with that. There are laws and procedures put into place to protect children in those instances. But like, it's like you, you're going one extreme to another. Like, you can't do that. And, and I do have an issue with that. And there have been parents who have gotten in a lot of trouble for not believing in modern medicine and they don't get their child treatment and they go to jail because their child's died and that's a major problem. 

0  

00:57:36

And, you know, so we can go one way and the other, but this family, I mean, I wrote a whole article about them, but it dealt with Charlotte's web and the family just up and moved to Colorado. Cause they were like, we don't know what else to do. And this is working for their child. And there's a difference in that. And there's a quality of life that you have to put into perspective when it comes to that. And you know what, and in my opinion, just like everything else, again, I've know that out of the two of us, I'm the hippie and I get it. I'm cool with it. I mean, but if it's, if it's something that grew in the ground and it's some, like, I don't understand now, oleander also grows in the ground and that's poison, but there's tons of things out there like that, but there can also be a misuse of it and said, there needs to be a regular, definitely know tobacco. 

0  

00:58:30

Well, my point of it is, is, look, I don't even care about regulating the use of it if you really want it again. I think just like alcohol, I'm aware, Hey, you can, the graph and regulation of fat. I saw something the other day that was like, show me somebody that's died from weed. And it was this really funny thing that it was like, I mean, if you walked under a falling 10,000 pounds of weed, it would kill you. I mean, which I get it, like I understand it can be a gateway thing. I had it. I mean, I think we've discussed it in an episode, but for those who don't know, I mean, I had a father that dealt with major drug issues, all his life. 

0  

00:59:13

I get it. Like I'm not blind to that. Right. I get that. I think people who are conservative in their use in her responsible with it, you go for it. A lot of people who have anxiety benefit greatly from it. A lot of people use CBD and we'll actually, it'll come out in all of our episode notes and everything. But we actually, we partner with a company who sell CBD products and I use CBD products to sleep and to help me with anxiety and stuff like that. And so I don't think that there's anything wrong with safe usage of products. And you know, what, if the state really has a problem with it, then you know what, make it legal and put a tax on it. 

0  

00:59:56

If it's really that big of a deal to you, like you, the government anyway, the government always wants money. So if that's what you're looking 

1  

01:00:04

For with alcohol, 

0  

01:00:06

You alcohols 

1  

01:00:07

Legal and that's what I'm saying, tax on it. I absolutely, I mean, and that's what I'm saying. It's insane. 

0  

01:00:13

What 

1  

01:00:14

I called there is there is, there are got bonds with it. There are regulations on it. 

0  

01:00:21

And I it's, it's one of those things. I think they're like, we don't know how to regulate it. We don't know this or that, but it's just insane to me. Like they can come in and they can arrest people for having like one plant. And it's like, come on people, we got bigger fish to fry. 

1  

01:00:37

There are regulations. And you know, they're talking about, you know, we need to make guns illegal. Yeah. Well, and I know that, you know, I jumped to guns. Okay, well you made drugs illegal and nobody has those, 

0  

01:00:55

Right? Exactly. 

1  

01:00:57

Exactly. 

0  

01:00:58

You can't. I mean, it's just like you try to outlaw something and you're going to make the, 

1  

01:01:06

And law abiding citizens are not going to be the ones that get them. 

0  

01:01:11

And it's <inaudible>, and that's the thing too, is which this is why you have to be really careful. There are a lot of things that you try to make illegal and you're not making it. You're not making it to where people can't get or can't do those things. You're only making it to where people are going to unsafely do it. 

1  

01:01:35

And that's where I with it is even if you can't regulate the making. So, you know, I love this. This is some great stuff. And I've got for you. Well, there's not any regulation in the making of it. Like people, you don't know what 

0  

01:01:50

Exactly 

1  

01:01:51

In a marijuana stand with it. And so it's going to be more dangerous. Whereas if it's regulated, you know, then it's going to be put through a more strenuous, you know, it's, there's, there's going to be FDA approval or whatever kind of approval. There's going to be laws on how it is made. And it's going to have to go through some sort of a push. 

0  

01:02:13

I mean, we all know FDA also has its own. It has an agenda, but yes it's. Yes. It, and in theory and theoretically yes, it will. And, and that's, what's, you know, I get from all sides, but it's, it's at some point too, that it's just like, yo realize like, come on now, like you have people which is another soap box. I'm not going to, I'm going to say this and I'm going to move past it. So I can't get on the soap box, but she's going to let you touch the corner. And it will, you have people who are in jail longer for possession of marijuana than for murder. 

0  

01:02:53

And it's like our, I'm sorry, are you kidding me? And I mean, and I'm being dead serious and people will understand, there are people who seriously go to jail for like eight years for murder. And then you have someone who's in jail for 20 years for possession of marijuana, with intent to distribute. No, I don't think that that's right. But also someone murdered someone, they sh I mean, it's just insane. It's like, really? How are you justifying that? Like what I mean? And I get it. People should, whatever I get it. But there's just such a discrepancy between the two that it's like, you know, and I know we haven't discussed it. 

0  

01:03:38

And I know we haven't talked about it a lot on this show because there's not a lot of information out yet. And even from the time that we record this, this isn't going to be coming out until the 18th. But I know, and by that point, I'm sure a lot more is going to be known, but you know, we've not discussed the Gabby potato case on, you know, yet, because I don't want to perpetuate information. That's not a hundred percent verified. And I, while there are podcasts out there that have discussed it and they have discussed it in depth and through a few episodes, I try to err, on the side of caution, I do feel for the potato family. I also on the other side and y'all can find this controversial or not. 

0  

01:04:22

I'll also feel for the laundry family because there are family members of the laundries who have nothing to do with this. And I feel as though, and y'all might understand as well, when we report on cases, a lot of times we will go one way in the other. Once we figure out how a case is done, whether the person was guilty or whether they were innocent or whether the proof that's there. And guys you'll know how many times we've said, like we've listened to things. And they said, oh, the police wanted to give them a lie detector test and they didn't take it. You have two camps that are like, always take a lie detector tests. 

0  

01:05:02

And then you have the other ones that say it's inadmissible in court, never take a lie detector test. Cause they can't use it. You know, you go from one side to the other. And so no, we've not talked about that case really at all. And I do know that as of this recording, which is we're recording this October 9th, I do know that Brian laundry is still has not been found as of right now, which yeah, that's another thing as well. But we are in, we are not talking about it. Not because we don't feel sympathy for the situation that's going on and that it is very tragic, but you know, there has been a lot of speculation in the case. And now people are trying to say that laundry is a serial killer and there, yeah, it's, it's gotten really crazy. 

0  

01:05:45

And I don't, there are a lot of other missing people out there that we also need to focus on and try to find true. And there are a lot of missing people who have been missing for a long time. And I know the true crime community kind of latched on to Gabby because she was an avid true crime podcast listener and people like that's how kind of it got really big in the podcast community is cause she was a big fan of the podcast morbid, which is a very wildly popular podcast. And so I do know that that's how that happened, but guys also keep in mind, there are families that are real, there are families that are dealing with this in the public eye and w as a public, we, we are not here to be judged jury and executioner. 

0  

01:06:35

We have to wait as much as that sucks. We have to wait and see, because there are some things that we don't know, we don't that we aren't. And we won't know, we won't know until he's either found whether that be dead or alive at this point, we don't know what that is. Right. And go on. And he goes to trial or he is unfortunately found deceased. And we find out after that, nobody knows. And so we will not discuss or update things going on in that case, because I don't want to contribute to a rumor mill. 

0  

01:07:18

Right. When we are not aware of what's going on now. They also say they found the Zodiac killer. They did that. We'll definitely be discussing that. And that's still up in the air as well. But Zodiac is of course the case that everybody wants to find out what happened. And there was a movie about Zodiac with mark Ruffalo. And what I saw the other day is, is a girl posted. And she said, imagine the Zodiac killer went and saw the Zodiac movie with a bunch of his friends. And they went to go leave and the guy goes, well, that was a crazy story. You guys be safe going home. Like, I mean, but really it's true. 

0  

01:07:58

And you know, and again, we don't know if this guy's really the Zodiac killer. We don't know any of those things, guys, you gotta be really careful, really careful when you talk about true crime cases and it's, and it's dangerous. But you know, at the end of the day we feel for the potato family, it's a really difficult thing that they're going through and they're going through it and laundry family there, they're both going through it in the public spotlight and we will never understand what that is. And you know, and I'm not placing a blame or innocence anywhere in that in saying that if, if, if, if families, if families are hiding something, I don't believe that is right, but we also don't know if they are right. 

0  

01:08:43

So we cannot accuse a family of hiding something when they really might not be. But if they are, then yes, I agree that that's not, that's not a good situation to be in either still again. And I know it's hard to put yourself in that situation, but she just got to think of what if it was your family that's really difficult to do. And while I think that the outcome of the case thus far has been very unfortunate for the Viscito family. I am glad that in some sense, there is a closure kind of to that part where, you know, I do know there are families who have had, who do currently have family members missing and they don't know where their family member is. 

0  

01:09:31

And so that is very difficult. And we really do need to focus on other people who are missing as well, guys. I mean, they have had a lot of people recently who have gone missing that have, unfortunately their remains have been found. And that is very sad and it is a very scary world we live in and we have to be really careful, but guys just show grace like it it's hard. And, and I just, I don't want people to think that we're being insensitive by not saying anything about this case, because it is national. There is a reason we've not been discussing it just because we don't, we don't know anything. 

0  

01:10:12

And we don't want to add fuel to any, I don't want to add fuel to it. And like we said, by this recording, more information could have come out. I hope more information comes out. I hope that more closure is given to two families that are out there, but right now, yeah, we, I don't feel comfortable. I don't feel comfortable, you know, saying too much about it other than the fact that, you know, our thoughts, prayers, condolences, good feeling, good vibes, go out to the families of, you know, the Pitino family, but also any family who has a family member that's missing. That's very difficult. And it's very hard thing to go through. 

0  

01:10:52

People think that I'm more been in a lot of ways that I think of things. One thing I talked to somebody about the other day is, you know, my dad did pass away when I was younger. And, and I said something to someone about how, oh, well I was really lucky. And they were like, what do you mean? You were lucky? And I was like, he died in a day. Like I was lucky. I've seen people who have seen their family members suffer. And I did see my dad suffer in a lot of ways, but as far as he had an aneurysm and a stroke in the same day, he was not coming back from that. And for me, I was a lucky one because I say that in saying not to be insensitive, but to say he died the same day. 

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01:11:32

I didn't want to have I, yeah. I didn't have to sit there and watch it drag out. And so I understand that. I think of things in weird ways, but you know, since this 

1  

01:11:43

It's hard, it is hard to watch somebody waste away in linger because I watched 

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01:11:48

My granddaughter. Yes. And I do remember that she wasn't 

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01:11:51

My grandmother for a long time. I lost her before. It's hard. I lost her. So I understand that. 

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01:11:56

And that way of thinking, and just with P with families who do have missing family members, you don't know what to mourn. You don't know, and that's difficult. And so, you know, are, you know, really do think about those families that are out there. Guys, if you do see posts or anything of, of anything that you see that someone is missing, please share it. You don't know who knows somebody who could know something who could know something. And one of the things that on the murder squad with Paul holes and Billy Jensen, one thing that they always say is someone always knows something. Someone always saw something that they didn't know that they saw in. Please, please, please, please, please. I cannot reiterate this enough after things that I've seen with the potato case, if you or someone, you know, knows something, please go to the authorities, do not go to social media. 

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01:12:48

Yes, there that all it does is it helps people help people who need to run. And if that is a case that is going on, not to say that it is or is not, but also anybody who is on the run, social media is a really good way for them to figure out what's going on. So if you do or know anything, please go to the authorities, do not go to social media or to the media because there are things that as a public, we are not privy to know in cases. So any information that anybody could have could always be helpful to them. So, you know, again, we really, you know, we feel for the potato family, it is a situation we will never understand in our lifetime, hopefully. 

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01:13:34

And hopefully no one we know we'll have to either, but tomorrow is never promised. So always remember that as well. Always keep your, keep yourself safe, keep your friends safe. And we did talk about, you know, Leah said earlier, that is the reason I'll wear one air pod is I'm always on alert of people around me and always do that for yourself as well. It's unfortunate. We have to do that, but always, always keep your head on a swivel just in case you never know what can happen, but we appreciate you guys for sticking with us, sticking with, through the ghosts and the witch craft and rabbit holes. 

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01:14:16

We always, and a rabbit holes, soap boxes, anything really? We just appreciate you sticking around for the ride. We have a website where you can find all of the information kind of that you want to about us, not the real personal things, but who knows eventually one day all might find out those as well. It's one nation under crime.com. We are one nation under crime on Facebook and Instagram and at O N UC pod on Twitter. If you love our podcast, just like we do go review us on apple podcast with five stars, send it to me. You get a cool sticker. 

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01:14:58

We have a Patrion. If you would like to help with costs of hosting and making the show, which we would really appreciate it. Since I have a computer that's almost dying. You can do that as well. patrion.com search for one nation under crime. If you scroll down to the show notes, it's also down there as well. We will see you here. Same time, different crime, different spooky crime next week. And remember that there isn't always Liberty and justice for all. Especially if you're accused of witchcraft, goodbye guy,