Nov. 15, 2021

1825: The Beauchamp-Sharp Tragedy


Murder in a passionate rage is one that is heard in many stories. A jilted lover is pushed over the edge to insanity and murders the one they love. But what happens when it's the passionate rage of a woman that makes her husband kill another man? 

This week the ONUC gals discuss the Beauchamp-Sharp or Kentucky Tragedy. Join them as they discuss the case, take a deep dive into Kentucky Bourbon, and discover how long is too long for an epitaph.

Trigger Warning Level: Low

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Sources: Murder by Gaslight

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Transcript

You were listening to one nation under crime, a chronological true crime podcast. Each week we go through our nation's history and discuss one case from each year starting in 1800. I'm Kayla and I'm Leah. We are almost to Thanksgiving almost. Oh, most Turkey the next, the next, oh yeah. The next episode that comes out will be the week of Thanksgiving. This week, we are in 1825 and in 1825 of this week, we are one going to cover a very interesting location. And she's looking at 

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00:00:42

Me with a Glint in her eye. I am a for REA 

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00:00:45

It's fun. I found some interesting information about it. And so my episode notes were a little longer because I went off on a tangent of, of exploring this area that we're in. It's fun though. This smile scares me. Our sources for this week, we have murder by Gaslight. Always, always, always a good one. Do you use it well, because at this time it's murder by Gaslight. So this is the time where they have a lot of information for earlier crimes. Like that makes sense. I did use Wikipedia just because this case it's a bear. And so Wikipedia kind of laid it out. 

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00:01:27

Pretty sequentially kind of like murder by Gaslight did. They did a really good job of that. So, and another thing on Wikipedia, if you scroll down to the bottom, like they cite everything. So you can click on the websites that they got, that like all the informations compel from. So all the information is legit on there. Just, just FYI. I'm saying we will. Well, I guess I'll tell you what we're covering this week. So it doesn't give too much away. We are covering the Beauchamp sharp tragedy of 1825. It's also known by another name. We'll get to it. Okay. How's the shrimps shop like? Beau champ, Beau B E a U C H a M P Beauchamp. 

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00:02:13

I specifically looked it up. Well, the reason I ask is told it how to tell me how to say it. Well, there isn't a 

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00:02:19

Ask is my friend, her maiden name is Beacham guess how she spells it 

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00:02:31

Like that? Yeah. That's pretty bad. Not 

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00:02:35

Bad. That's just allies. 

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00:02:39

It's cause it's an Alabama. I'm from here. I can say that any way. Just our events of 1825, January 10th, Indianapolis became the capital of Indiana. We you're not in Indiana this week. January 19th, Ezra Daggett and nephew. Thomas Kensett patented storing food in tin cans. Nice. Interesting. I'd like patents and inventions coming out. I love it. It's very interesting. Oh, speaking of February 5th, Hannah Lord Montagu, which just is a great name. 

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00:03:21

Yes. Created the first detachable shirt color. Awesome. March 2nd, the first grand opera in English was performed in New York city, March 4th, John Quincy Adams was inaugurated as the sixth president of the United States. And John C. Calhoun was sworn in as vice president. Both of them will come back in this case, strangely enough, March 17th, the north folk and Dedham group. They're an insurance carrier. That's out of Massachusetts. They were founded as the north folk mutual fire insurance company, April 10th. 

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00:04:01

The first hotel in Hawaii opened May 11th. The American tract society was founded. This is a non sectarian evangelical literary society that mostly published Christian literature May 25th. The American Unitarian association was founded Unitarianism by definition, not necessarily by practice, but for those of you who are not aware, this is the best way that I can explain. Unitarianism because there are a lot of people, like I said that, listen from all over. A lot of people might not know what Unitarian ism. Yes. Unitarian tell you these words. I can't, I can't Unitarianism is. 

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00:04:43

So by definition, it is a non, this is what I'm talking about. A non Trinitarian Christian theological movement that believes the God. And Christianity is one singular entity, not in the three forms in the Trinity, which for those who are not religious people, it's the father, son and the holy spirit. So Unitarianism just believes that there is only one God, and it's not. They don't. They believe in one singular entity, not the Trinity. Anyways, the American Unitarian association was founded in this year, July 14th, the Jefferson literary and debating society. It was founded at the university of Virginia. 

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00:05:24

How much you want to bet it was named after Thomas Jefferson. I mean it's Virginia and Jefferson it's gotten that. I know, I know I had things to say, but I'm not October 26. The Erie canal opened between the Hudson river and lake Erie, November 7th, 1400 Missouri Shawnee natives were forcibly removed from Missouri to Kansas. Anyways, November 26th, we just discussed this last week and I told y'all it would come back. The first college fraternity Kappa alpha was founded at union college in New York. We talked about Chi Phi last week saying that they were, and I believe the difference might be that Chi Phi is the first men's fraternity and KA Kappa alpha might just be for eternity, which can also include women. 

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00:06:18

I'm not sure, but I couldn't also find anything, right? You couldn't fall in definitive. This fraternity claims to be the, for father of the modern fraternity system in north America, further feeding into the who's, the oldest fraternity debate. This is an excerpt from the Kappa alphas Wikipedia page. It is considered to be the oldest national secret Greek letter, social fraternity. And was it a secret? Right? I was just thinking and was the first of the fraternities, which would eventually become known as the union triad while several fraternities claim to be the oldest Baird's manual states that cap alpha has maintained a continuous existence since its foundation making it the oldest undergraduate fraternity that exists today. 

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00:07:06

And that could be it <inaudible> might've had their charter pooled at some point that I was going to ask if the other one has been continual. Yeah. So December 6th, president John Adams suggested the establishment of a national observatory are undated events in 1825. New harmony, Indiana was established as a social experiment. It is a very interesting story. Robert Owen purchased a site to implement his vision for a quote, new moral world of happiness, enlightenment and prosperity through education science technology, and communal living Owen believed his utopian community would create quote, a superior social, intellectual, and physical environment based on his ideals of social reform. 

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00:07:57

And I just put dot, dot dot. It didn't go well. He basically wanted to create like its own self-sustaining city and it did not go well. It was bad. The United States postal service started a dead letter office. Now, do you know what the dead letter office is? Adele? This is where undeliverable mail is processed. Either the letter can't be delivered as addressed or there is no return address. Mail is usually opened to try to find an address to forward to if an address is found, the envelope is usually sealed using tape or postal seals or enclosed in plastic bags and delivered. 

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00:08:44

If the letter or parcel is still undeliverable, valuable items are then auction off while the correspondence is destroyed. Well, I mean, I would love to work in that office. It's kind of fun. You get to see what's like, what are you mailing to somebody? I bet those people have some wild stories because anything that you mail without a return address, most of the time is not something you want return. Sure. So interestingly, like stuff that we mail out right now, I don't put a return address cause we don't have a PO box or anything. So like I hate to, like, not that I don't trust certain people, but I hate to like give my address. 

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00:09:29

You know what I mean? So like some things that I mail, like I make sure I put the correct address. Like I look it up on the U S P S website to make sure it's correct. Had to mail something to our friends in Scotland. That was a wild ride. So yeah, those addresses are different, very different. I was like, it feels wrong. It feels wrong. And, and it took so long because for those of you who aren't aware, USP S pretty much just announced, Hey, we're running slow deal with it. And so I got really nervous because it had been awhile. And I was like, ah, so finally, anyways, they posted that they received it. 

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00:10:10

And I was like, I addressed it correctly. I was so nervous and say, I didn't even think about it, but I mean, I grew up sending letters to, or boxes or whatever, but yeah, it feels wrong when you're writing that address, you know, sending Christmas cards or whatever. Yeah, it's crazy. So our births in 1825, February 11th, Francis pigeon Sr pigeon an American baseball pitcher was born. He was one of the top pitchers of his era. He was opposed to paying baseball players and authored a law, banning it in the national association of baseball players. 

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00:10:54

Huh? He's an Aquarius, July 2nd, Richard Henry Stoddard. He was an American critic and poet. He wrote little red riding hood and he was the editor of four of PO's most famous works. He is a cancer for those of you, Edgar Allen Poe, he's a cancer, July 10th, Benjamin Paul Ackers. He was an American sculptor. He's a cancer August 7th, Jacob Ray mold like MOU L D mold. It's a very weird last name. This is terrible. He's an architect, illustrator, linguist, and musician. 

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00:11:34

He was one of the contributors to the designs of central park. He also was a founding member member of the American Institute of architects. He also collaborated in the design of the museum of modern art and the American museum of history in New York city. Been there such a cool place. He's a Leo and that's where night at the museum was filmed. It's so cool. Anyways, I Googled, I love that museum. It's gorgeous. And I've also been to the natural history museum in DC as well. And I don't know, I almost think that I like new. 

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00:12:18

York's more for specific reasons, but I like all of the gemstones and everything at the natural history in DC, they also have the hope diamond, which we might do a case on because the hope diamond is cursed. Like very, it has a very long line. They tried to have the hope diamond like exercised by Catholic priests because seriously, anybody who, because the hope diamond is never supposed to be owned. And that was kind of like the whole thing of it. Like it has this whole long list of people who owned it, who died. And we're weird ways. Even the guy who delivered the postman, who delivered the hope diamond to the Smithsonian died in a weird way, like the day later. 

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00:13:06

So anyways, when we get there, we might cover that because it's just a really interesting story of how it came here. And there's this whole theory of like, when it came, because technically like the Smithsonian, isn't like, yes, it's the Smithsonian Institute and everything like that. But Smithsonian, technically technically belongs to the United States. And so there's this whole theory that when we received the hope diamond was when the United States kind of like had a major downfall. So it connects to history in a lot of different ways. So we might eventually cover that, but love the American museum of natural history in New York. It's it's beautiful. 

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00:13:46

Did you see the slaw skeleton? Yes. It was very massive. There used to be giant. I know it's which sorry, getting off on tangent. Did you know that they discovered like crackings like re crackings are real they're real Leah real. <inaudible> when my boyfriend was telling me about it last night, as we were watching our movie, that's what I said. That's funny. So, and cause I was like, next is messy. She's real. Misty's real. Next is Nessie. We may have found a Nessie egg. When we were at a Kurt castle, we went to a lot nest nest nest while it happened to me, she will the neck, the neck, the neck, the egg was in a nest. 

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00:14:36

So technically you found a lock nest. I'm just saying, give me a second and I can make it work, make it happen. But yeah, they discovered like, guys go look it up on YouTube. It's one of the coolest and scariest things you'll ever see of like people catching footage of these giant squids that were like crackings. And it is in sane how big they are like whale. They're finding whales with all these scars on them. And for the longest time they thought it was like from fishermen or things like that. And they're like, no, no, no, no, no cracking. So which I mean anyways, think of how large whales are. 

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00:15:17

I can't the fact that like crackings have now been discovered because I have a weird thing about the ocean because the ocean is very deep and it kind of terrified just like how space terrifies us. The depths of the ocean terrified me because we don't know what's down there now there's at least an end at some point to it, even though we've never found it poking around, but I'm not going to go look for it. So I saw, I saw finding Nemo. That was enough. September 13th, we have William Henry Reinhardt. He was an American sculptor and he is considered the last important American sculptor to work in the classical style. 

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00:15:57

He's Virgo, October eight, pat shall Beverly Randolph was a multiracial American medical doctor, Oculus spiritualist trance, medium and writer. And he was a Libra. He did a lot of stuff list from doctor to spiritualist, which spiritualists and Oculus, where people who did say ANSYS back then very interesting. Our deaths in 1825, we have Eli Whitney on January 8th, inventor of the cotton gin and milling machine. Also from Alabama. He is from Alabama and he did Alabama, Alabama child who had Alabama history in fourth grade should be able to tell you that shit. 

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00:16:44

Oh, I did say it in the last episode, but no, it's this upset. I got confused on my years, March 4th, Hercules Mulligan, Hercules Mulligan, British government. And it just says Taylor and spy during the American revolutionary war. And we now know he's buried in Trinity church. So there you go. Just tying everything back. Raphael Peele was also, he also died on March 4th. He is the first professional painter of still life. So he wasn't dead when no, that's why I just said I got it wrong last year when Lafayette. So he might not have been having a little meeting who knows. They'll tell the story of tonight. 

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00:17:26

Cause the other two were already gone. They're depressing. Sad. June 1st, Daniel and his birthday, Daniel Tompkins was he died. He was the sixth vice president of the United States. Peter Pierre Charles lift FLA. Yes, he is a French. You speak French like Joey on Flint. Hey, I had to look it up. I typed it in and I had to literally put it in there phonetically, cause I wanted to get it right, because it's because it spilled lit infant. And so I didn't want to be a complete American. 

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00:18:07

And so it wasn't that full French should have a favorite of system. Yes. So he is a French American military engineer who designed the basic plan for Washington DC. It is called the <inaudible> plan, the Lafayette lift plan. So on to our case, November 6th, 1825, Kentucky legislators, Solomon P sharp was murdered by Jeroboam Orville Beauchamp in an attempt to honor the wishes of his soon to be wife Anna Cook. 

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00:18:51

This is called the Beauchamp sharp tragedy or the Kentucky tragedy this week. We are traveling to not the state, but the Commonwealth of Kentucky, specifically to the Capitol Capitol of Frankfurt in the 1780s, a pioneer named Steven Frank was killed while making salt at a Ford and the Kentucky river. For those who don't know, not for the vehicle, a Ford is a shallow place in a river where you can walk or drive across after this. The settlers called the crossing Frank's Ford. As you know, as names of towns usually do it morphed in became Frankfurt there. 

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00:19:34

James Wilkinson was an early promoter of the town and purchased 260 acres on the north side of the Kentucky river in 1786, Blaine was developed and the area is known as downtown Frankfort. Today. Kentucky was adopted as the 15th state in 1792 and there were six oral arguments about where the capital would be according to earth, according to early history of the area, what allegedly sold. It was the offer of a log house as the Capitol building for seven years, several town, lots 50 pounds of locks and hinges. 10 boxes of glass, 1500 pounds of nails and $3,000 in gold. 

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00:20:22

So all that again, the Kentucky general assembly appropriated funds in 1769 to provide a house to accommodate the governor. It was completed two years later and is known as the old governor's mansion. The mansion claims to be the oldest official executive residents still in use in the United States. We might be back in Kentucky later. So I'll end like in another episode, all into the history there. Okay. And we're going to move on to fun facts. I like fun facts. We can't have enough episode about Kentucky without discussing one specific thing. 

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00:21:07

For those of you who are not aware, Leah is Kentucky is the home of <inaudible>. And if you think for a second that I wasn't going to take a deep dive into this topic, then this must be your first episode because we're taking a deep dive. Yes. So learned a lot about bourbon a lot and didn't already know lot. It was, I was confused. We'll get there. I, I will not say I'm a connoisseur in the knowledge, but the taste. Okay, we'll go with that. We'll say, okay, so I'm not a connoisseur for those of you who are not aware, oh, bourbons are whiskey, but not all whiskey is bourbon. 

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00:21:57

Okay. As said by my boyfriend. Cause when I asked him the difference, he goes, all I know is this. So y'all are about to learn a lot more bourbon is classified by a few things and people are very specific in the labeling. It is a whiskey before it is labeled a bourbon and it has very specific requirements to be called bourbon. It has to be made from at least 51% corn by law. It has to be aged in new, charred Oak by law. This is not like FDA or anything. This is like bison by us law, which will be interesting in a second. 

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00:22:42

It has to be higher than 40% alcohol by volume ABV for those of you who are not aware, but lower than 80%. So it can't be under 40 or over 80 has to be right in the middle. And it has to be made in the United States to be officially labeled bourbon. You can make bourbon outside of the United States. There is some debate as to whether it can be called bourbon. If it's not made in Kentucky, it can be just a lot of them are not, but it cannot be labeled bourbon outside of champagne. Yes, exactly. 

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00:23:22

Like champagne. So you cannot label it as bourbon outside of the U S even though you could make bourbon. Most of the rest of the world is, is they, you know, like Irish and Scottish whiskey and stuff like that. That's all whiskey. It's not bourbon because it can't be so yes, in 1964, Congress declared bourbon as America's native spirit officially official. So by Congress law bourbon is America's national liquor and 95% of the world's bourbon is made in Kentucky. 

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00:24:11

Yeah. The hair are more barrels of bourbon in Kentucky than people. Oh no, it is said that if one specific and we'll get to them in a minute, it is said that if one specific, specific one bourbon distiller in the state stopped ever making bourbon again ever, they would still have enough bourbon to sell for the next 20 years. Wow. 

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00:24:51

If they never made it again. Wow. There are 13 distilleries owned by eight companies that produce over 99% of the whiskey made in the United States of those 10 are located in Kentucky whiskey or bourbon whiskey. Okay. We'll get into, I was just making sure in wa yeah, we're getting there. So of those companies, like I said, 10 are in Kentucky. Frankfurt is home to a few distilleries, including Buffalo trace distillery, which specializes in Kentucky bourbon, castle, and key, which they specialize. 

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00:25:36

You would drink this in gin and vodka. They sell both it's called castle and key, which I thought was just castle. It thought it was great. I mean, it's kind of made for you and three and only in Scotland. That's where my mind. So thinking princess and three boys, farm distillery, which makes both bourbon and whiskey. Now let's get into the other distilleries just in Kentucky. There's a lot. There is Booker know Jim beam. Jim beam also makes knob Creek red stag Booker's and Baker's there's makers most seriously. 

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00:26:22

Maker's mark is in Kentucky. You can go and you can dip your own maker's mark bottle ID, that brown and foreman, which makes old Forester, Woodford reserve, wild Turkey, the burn chicken, the Bernheim distillery, which makes Elijah Craig, Evan Williams and heaven hill four roses, which I've heard is a really good one. I've not tried it, but I've heard that. It's a really good, really good one. A Barton 1792. And last, but certainly not least. We did say this before, but Buffalo trace is in Kentucky. They are also known for making Pappy van Winkle, which we will get into in just a moment. 

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00:27:07

The ones located outside of Kentucky, our Jack Daniels, which is in Lynchburg, Tennessee. I've been there. If you've never been there, even if you don't drink whiskey, still a really cool place to go because the entire town is just the coolest thing ever. Like it's a town square and you can, it's so cool. They take you through the whole tour. They take you through everything. Fun fact. Also a lot of these other places do it, but every payday, if you work at Jack Daniel's, you get to take home a bottle of Jack Daniels. That was their fun thing. Cause they said we always have perfect attendance on payday. So they also, which is very weird when you drive into Lynchburg because they also have like, it's like Jack, Daniel's federal credit union. 

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00:27:50

And it's like, what? I'm sorry. It's very cool. It's a very, pretty, very, pretty place to travel to as well. If you can't drink in the distillery though, right? And I am I, am I wrong remembering that? No, you can, oh, you, they have different tours that you can take. When I went, we did the angels flight tour. You can, because what they do is depending on the tour that you take, you can try different types. And we took the angels flight tour when I went with someone and it's so the angels flight is based off of the Angel's share of whiskey, which I didn't put in here, but I'll get into it real quick. The angel share whiskey. 

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00:28:30

These are usually the barrels that are kept at the very top of barrel houses. And they let off certain spirits into the air from the barrels and they call that the angel share. Okay. Because that's the share that the angels get, cause it's at the very top of the barrel house. So there are a lot of other that we went on the angels flight tour, which you got all of like the really high end Jack Daniels that they make. Like the Frank Sinatra, Jack Daniels, like very specific ones that they make that are real expensive. I could only make it through two of them. Cause it is so strong. Like they're very high ABV content, but they're very cool as well. 

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00:29:12

You can buy your own bottle of Jack Daniels there and they'll engrave it for you. Some reason I was thinking that you, you couldn't try it. Maybe it was somebody else that went on a tour or something. Anyway, there's certain tours that you go on and they don't allow you to, because you have to purchase the tour that like specifically you get to do like a taste and you go into this room. That's really cool because the room is made of glass from like floor to ceiling, like the walls and you're in a barrel house. And so all around you are just barrels. Cool. And they go through each one and they're like, this is the tasting note of this is what you'll taste in this. And this is what you know. So they do all that stuff. It's a lot of fun. If you ever get a chance to go. And then like, there's like these cute little lunch places and there's a winery there that has a store. And so you get to do all kinds of fun things, but that's in Lynchburg. 

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00:29:56

Then George Dickel is in Tula, Houma, Tennessee and MPG. Indiana is obviously Lawrenceburg, Indiana many might know the name, Buffalo trace or a wild Turkey, but not necessarily because of their alcohol. In 2013, the Buffalo trace heist was discovered when 195 bottles of 20 year Pappy van Winkle, 27 bottles of 13 year van Winkle, family reserve label and 50 to 70 cases of Eagle rare and in known amount of barrels could not be accounted for. 

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00:30:46

Let me put that into perspective for some people who are not aware of Pappy van Winkle, Abby van Winkle is a 20 year bourbon. It has to be kept in a barrel for 20 years. It is very rare. They do not come out with it's one of those things. It's not, they don't come out with a very often. And when they do one bottle costs a thousand dollars. So they were missing 195 bottles. Oh no. So the amount total that is stolen is still not known, but the cost could be in the millions. 

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00:31:32

There is. If you see the show heist on Netflix, it's not just one heist. It's a bunch of different ones. And there's usually two episodes per heist. There are two episodes on the Buffalo trace heist. They were also sealing wild Turkey at the same time. It's very, very interesting because this guy ended up being arrested and he went to jail for it. And then they did one of those things where they were like, if you say every, you know, they brought in all these people for interviews. Cause they were trying to figure out who was stealing it because the guy that ended up getting arrested was not the one stealing it. He was just in possession of it. It's a whole thing. It's crazy. Like you got to watch the show because it's very crazy how it ends up happening. 

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00:32:15

There's a sheriff in it. And the sheriff was like all high and mighty and he ends up not getting reelected because of the whole thing. It's crazy. And they have a lot on that show. It's reenactments, but the people who were affected by it are interviewed and it's very good. It's a good, they made the show very well for the way that it's made good food. And, and always at the end, they flashed the screen of like we asked these people to be interviewed and none of them would interview and like all this other stuff. So it's very interesting. But they were bringing people in for interviews at the Sheriff's department. And you know, it was one of those things of like, anything you say today, we will give you immunity for. 

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00:32:59

But if you don't say it today, then you do not have immunity. So they interviewed this guy an hour, never dude. They interviewed this guy and the guy's like, well, I might have stolen some Pappy van Winkle come to find out the guy that went to jail. He was sentenced for 15 years. But ended up not serving that long. The guy who went to jail never stole the 20 year Pappy van Winkle, never. Oh, NASA had it. He had it. He didn't, oh, they started figuring out that all this stuff was being stolen and they lumped it all into this one guy. 

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00:33:42

The guy that got arrested that went to jail, they only found barrels. They found barrels of bourbon on his property. And the names on the barrels were spray painted out. So they didn't know where the bourbon was from. Oh no. So this guy is talking to the Sheriff's department and they're like, you know, anything you say now? And he's like, well, I might've stolen this. And they're like, okay, seriously, anything. And he's like, well, I might've stolen this. Come to find out that guy alone, that he could name stole 17 cases of Pappy van Winkle. And he was an inventory guy. And the way he, he had been doing it for years, the way he got away with it is he was an inventory guy and he just wouldn't scan a box and he would take the box. 

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00:34:27

He never served time. Never because he got immunity. Cause he got immunity that one day it is a crazy story because they go into a lot more. And anyways, the guy that ended up going to jail is in the show and he talks about it and it is, it is insane. Like his wife is in the show, his kids are in it. It's crazy. So that's the Buffalo trace heist. It's insane. Go look it up. They talk a lot about it because the way that they were saying is they were like, we can steal barrels and nobody will know because these barrels, that's why they say there's an unknown amount of barrels. They place barrel houses throughout the mountains because that's how like the temperature and everything is how they age. 

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00:35:11

Well, these barrel houses are set up in so many different areas. They go around and search. Like they check them out, but they were like, there's no way for them to know what's missing and what's not, they're stealing just barrels of bourbon and selling them for like $3,000 a barrel. It's it's the craziest story, but it's really cool. So, and there is, in some places you can find Pappy van Winkle, like in a liquor somewhere. And it's really funny cause it's always like $1,200 crazy. And they did not recover all of the, all of the liquor. They didn't recover all of it. So they asked people in the town, they were like, could you still buy a bottle of Pappy van Winkle today? 

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00:35:57

And the guy was like, yeah. And he's like, do you know who would like, could you get, if, if I asked you to go get one, could you get it? And he's like, yeah. And he goes, so will you tell me who has it? And he's like, I don't know, shotgun mountain. So the family that owns the distillery wants them all destroyed because they're like, we don't know if anybody's tampered with them or anything like that. But yeah, the guy was like, and this was made this year, like this, this documentary. And he was like, oh yeah, there's still bottles floating around out there that haven't been opened and you can still buy one. It's crazy. Which is funny because in, I don't think it's the same show, but there's another show on Netflix where they talk about the great maple syrup, heist of Canada, it's seriously as organized crime because they talk about how Canada, they have a syrup it's so, so stupid, regardless of how much syrup you make in a year, you can only sell a certain amount in the rest of the syrup has to go to the government. 

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00:37:04

It is insane. So all these people figured it out and started stealing the syrup from the government. It's a crazy. And they like went to jail for a long time because it's like a government regulated thing. It's they went through a whole story about it. It's confusing. So we will get to just a few notable people, not too many specifically from Frankfurt, just some interesting ones. If anybody was a fan of ABC's Nashville, the show Nashville, there was a guy on there. His name was will chase. He's an actor and a senior. He is from Frankfurt, Elijah Craig, you know that as a bourbon distillery, but he was a Baptist preacher and an early bourbon distiller in Kentucky. 

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00:37:49

And those two don't go together. And George Graham vest, who is known for coining the term man's best friend for a puppy dog at the center of our case this week is Anna Cook. She was said to be well-read unconventional unconventional, disdainful of society rules. And when it came to her looks, one record said she was quote in no way, a handsome or desirable woman. And while her husband was incredibly in love with her, he never commented on her looks, oh, now the one record who said she wasn't attractive was a little biased considering it was the brother of our murder victim. 

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00:38:37

The cook family at one point had a place in Virginia and they were in high society. But once the patriarch of the family died, the family's fortune started to fade and they moved to Kentucky. Anna was the oldest and the only girl of six, again, as I've said in earlier episodes, too many, yes. Upon the move to Kentucky, the reputation of the coat family's high status was quickly known. And Anna had many men interested in her while she wasn't known as technically beautiful. She was very popular. And like I said, she wasn't one for social norms, even though she had many proposals and I decided to not get married, this became a problem. 

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00:39:17

As she got older, she eventually was ousted by her female friends for her unconventional lifestyle. The men were still around though in 1820, the disdain for Anna grew in the community. One at the age of 35, Anna was pregnant. Oh no, unfortunately the baby was still born. But Anna claims that she had been tricked into love by a man named Colonel Solomon sharp. And she even knew the exact date that she became pregnant. It was Sunday, September 18th of 18, 19 while Sharp's wife, Eliza was in church, poor Eliza. 

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00:40:01

The sharps lived nearby the cook family and Anna knew Solomon sharp for about 12 years. Solomon sharp did not come from wealth and power, but he did work to eventually get there. As I said before, he was a Colonel and received that title by being a part of the state militia, he owned 3,600 acres of land was the most successful attorney in the bowling green Kentucky area and became a Congressman by the age of 24, John C. Calhoun, who was vice president at this time, he was also vice president for Andrew Jackson. He was in office at the time of this case. He had this to say about sharp quote. 

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00:40:43

He has few superiors of his age in any part of our country is pretty sharp goth and president John Quincy Adams called sharp quote, the brainiest man that ever came over the Allegheny mountains. And with accolades this high, it's not a surprise that sharp had his share of enemies as well. And news of Anna Cook's pregnancy was just what his opponents needed to try and push him out of power. Yeah, but the Senate created a committee and they looked into the charges of seduction and abandonment and found them groundless sharp was confirmed by the committee as attorney general, outwardly the sharps had the perfect marriage. 

0  

00:41:36

And in 1819, when sharp, allegedly got Anna pregnant, his own wife, Eliza was pregnant now seduction 

1  

00:41:47

And his own life was already pregnant at the time that he has 

0  

00:41:51

Allegedly got Anna pregnant. Yes I have. Anyways, I have in parentheses, try to not rant about this statement. Now seduction, at this time, mint taking the virtue of a woman with the false promise of marriage. 

1  

00:42:16

Obviously I wouldn't marry her because he was already married. 

0  

00:42:20

I am going to say this one thing, and then I'm going to move on from it. Ladies speaking to you, specifically moms, wives, what have you, let's make sure that our children, our daughters know that a man can not take your virtue in the ways that they like to think. I understand the statement. I understand the Senate, but just because that happens does not mean you're trash. Like Hm. You know what I mean? Like they make it sound like, oh, well you took the virtue of a woman. Like you took everything. 

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00:43:02

I used Kleenex. You are not that, that does. It makes you sound like you're used Kleenex, barring religious beliefs, conventions, whatever. I get that. That's also a part of it. However, negating all of that aside that does not make you a terror that doesn't make you used. Like, like they like to claim that doesn't make you, like you said a used Kleenex. Like that's not, you're not trash. I man can not take your virtue and take everything from you. Let's just, let's just make that clear. Cause that those statements like that really bother me because you make it seem as though that one act can make or break a woman. 

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00:43:47

And it's like, no, no, no, I'm sorry. You can choose to let it. You can choose it, but society cannot place that on you. So anyways, I I'm, I'm not, I didn't get on the soap box and I'm not going to 

1  

00:44:04

The whole discussion we can have there. I can choose to let it. I can, 

0  

00:44:08

But I just doesn't have to. So no one quite believed Anna was virtuous by those standards based on the amount of men that she had seen over the years. So they were saying like, clearly that's not the case 

1  

00:44:24

Trail of men. Unless she had been keeping steady company is what you're telling. Yes. 

0  

00:44:30

Never directly said they would just said she was, she was pursued by many men. That's all that was really said about her. She was puffed. So also if virtue at this time was, and every time I wrote virtue, I put it in quotes just to 

1  

00:44:48

Be real salty about it. But if that was an issue, it was customary for brothers or the father of the one quote, seduce to go after the man that wrong, that family member, Anna still had two brothers living at home at the time. And neither of them tried to like defend her honor. She was oldest of six and she was the oldest of six. She was 35. 

0  

00:45:13

She was 35 at this point. So there would have been younger brothers, but 

1  

00:45:19

How much younger may, if there's six of them, I mean, how many years 

0  

00:45:23

My dad died at some point before they moved here, I would imagine their early twenties, late teens, you know? I mean, but that's your big sister. So I can also see like jumping out on him depending on what, 

1  

00:45:39

But then, you know, you got, you got Phillip Hamilton, you know, he was 19. 

0  

00:45:43

Yeah. So there's, I'm just saying, well, this is when Anna found someone who would defend her. His name is Jeroboam champ shop. His name is terrible. Jeroboam Beauchamp. Jeroboam Orville Beauchamp was intelligent and known to be a bit of an over-exaggerated. He described himself as quote, early showing indications of genius. 

1  

00:46:15

He described himself. Sounds like her boss. He'll say I'm a genius. And Mo 

0  

00:46:23

And yeah, he said that in a legend in my own mind, yes, you are all day long. He had a good education. And when he was 16, he became a Shoemaker, then moved into teaching and then he decided to become a lawyer. Okay. He was similar to Anna in a few ways and was described as strong-willed eccentric and saw himself as someone above societal norms. But unlike Anna, he was also described as vindictive, unruly and violent. Those are 

1  

00:46:54

Not good 

0  

00:46:55

Qualities. One acquaintance asserted that he quote, never knew him to do any act of any kind, which indicated Magnum amenity of soul or real dignity of sentiment. 

1  

00:47:09

Sad. That is a horrible way to be described. I hope that when people describe me, they describe me exactly the opposite of the sky. 

0  

00:47:18

Leander sharp, who is Solomon Sharp's brother. Who's the one who said the such nice things about Anna's parents, denounced Beauchamp, quote, wild, last vicious, revengeful unprincipled and shameless conduct. By the age of 18, he had been formally charged with fathering a child and was rumored to have fathered others. Others, plural Beauchamp was only 18. When he heard about the scandal going on between Anna Cook and Solomon sharp, he knew she lived nearby and thought it'd be in his best interest to meet her. 

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00:47:58

Anna was known to be an avid reader and to have a very extensive library in her home, Beauchamp thought this would be a really good way to get to me, Anna, but it was thought that Beauchamp was more interested in her reputation as a quote fallen woman. Oh dear. They did meet and realized they had a lot in common with one another and an age gap of 17 years between the two. Did it prevent Beauchamp from falling in love with Anna? Anna loved him mostly, but not likely as much as he did for her, but Anna thought she might be able to use this love to her advantage. 

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00:48:38

Of course she did. She told Beauchamp that she wouldn't marry him, but quote, the hand, which should receive hers would have to avenge the injury. A villain had done to her. Her heart could never cease to eight till Colonel sharp should die through her instrumentality, given Beauchamp his reputation of being violent and vengeful. It's no surprise that he jumped on this right away. Beauchamp claims that in 1821, he traveled to Frankfurt to challenge Colonel sharp to a dual, a LA sharp refused to fight, but Beauchamp continued to pressure him in a threatening manner until sharp fell on his knees and begged for his life. 

0  

00:49:21

It's unlikely that this event actually occurred and sound very male. Remember he was a bit of an over-exaggerated. There were no eye witnesses, shocking, shocking guys. And like the charge of seduction Southern honor would have dictated the outcome. No man could survive in Kentucky politics after declining a dual in such a cowardly fashion in 1824, Anna agreed to marry Beauchamp though. Sharp was still alive, but according to Beauchamp, Slater confession, they continue to plot his murder in 1825. 

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00:50:02

After his tenure, as attorney general sharp campaign for the general assembly and his opponents revived the charge that he seduced Anna, by the time the news reached the newlywed shops, it included evidence that sharp had obtained a certificate from the midwife who delivered the stillborn child, claiming that the infant was likely of mixed race day. Used it different word here that I don't know if it's politically correct. Yeah. So I changed it to mixed rice. Well, that's good. So the implications of Anna having sex with a man who was of another race than her was more than Beauchamp could bear. 

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00:50:46

He set off for Frankfurt prepared for murder. And on the night of November 6th, 1825 Beauchamp paid a visit to sharp. He disguised himself armed with a large butcher knife sharpened on both edges and dipped in poison. Just for good measure. Oh, ma around 2:00 AM. He knocked on the door. And when sharp came outside to see who it was, Beauchamp, stabbed sharp in the heart saying die. You villain this very theatrical, right? I'm sorry. I laugh. That's not, it's very theatrical. It's just so crazy. How can that be true? The wound was actually to his abdomen. 

0  

00:51:26

So it's not real truth also, but it was fatal and sharp soon died after the first suspects included some of Sharp's political opponents, but when it was learned that Beauchamp had been in Frankfurt that day, he became the sole suspect. I mean, four days later, four days later, a patrol arrived at the cook family farm to arrest Beauchamp and take him back to Frankfurt. The trial of Beauchamp began on may eight. It took 11 days and included testimony from over 20 witnesses, Beauchamp, pleaded not guilty and claimed the evidence against him was entirely circumstantial. Well, we'll take his word on it. 

0  

00:52:07

Obviously he's innocent. Neither side mentioned charges of seduction because the defense did not want to raise the possibility that Beauchamp had been seeking revenge and the prosecution did not want the jury to think the murder was justified. The prosecution, oddly enough, made no attempt to establish a motive for the murder. Weird. I mean, it looked like the trial was going and going Beauchamps way until John Lowe, a friend and neighbor of the Beauchamp testified that they had tried to persuade him to commit perjury. We've discussed perjury before, but it's essentially lying under oath or lying on the stand. Lo brought to the stand a letter. 

0  

00:52:49

The Beauchamps had given him out lining what they wanted as well as a 7,000 word document coaching low on what to say on the stand low is to say that Beauchamp believes that the seduction story was alive, fabricated by Sharp's enemies and that he had no issues with sharp and had always spoken well of him. The damage of this testimony could not be undone by the Beauchamp attorney and the jury deliberated for less than an hour before returning a verdict of guilty Jeroboam Jeroboam Beauchamp was sentenced to hang on June 16th. 

0  

00:53:34

Anna was so distraught that she refused to leave her husband's side and joined him in his cell. It is important to mention here that the jail cell in question was a windowless dungeon accessible only through a trap door. And then 

1  

00:53:57

She was so distraught that she wouldn't leave his side. So, so she, she really was in love with him. This wasn't just a, I am so in. I mean, I'm using you to help me get out of this. She really was in love with him. 

0  

00:54:14

Supposedly, well, 

1  

00:54:17

Color may surprise 

0  

00:54:18

Together in the cell. The Beauchamp wrote the confession of Jeroboam oh, Beauchamp, a document which they believed would save Jeroboam from the gallows. The two use their shared love of romance novels to create this fantastic work, which described their love story in grave detail. Oh dear. They wrote of how Solomon sharp had seduced and abandoned Anna and how Sharpe had refused to duel Beauchamp before his murder to not worry though, they never denied that Jeroboam committed the murder. In fact, they outright admitted it in black and white on the page. 

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00:55:00

The Beauchamp believed that the confession would convince the governor and the people of Kentucky that the act was justified and Jeroboam should be released. The confession was finished before the execution, but the Beauchamps could not find anyone to publish it. I'm 

1  

00:55:16

Shocked. 

0  

00:55:17

Jeroboam petitioned the governor for a 30 day respite to complete the publication of his confession. The governor denied his request. This is a bit of a trigger warning here for suicide talk, but after receiving the news, Anna, and Jeroboam decided to complete suicide together, I can only think that the two got this idea from Romeo and Juliet, given their love for romantic literature. Anna had smuggled. Anna had smuggled a bottle of laudanum into the jail, which she concealed in her bosom. We briefly talked about laudanum back in episode one, when we discussed Alma's ideations of ending her life with a solution as well, laudanum was an alcoholic solution-based Tincher with morphine derive from opium. 

0  

00:56:07

And at this time it was used as a painkiller, the Beauchamp left instructions for their burial. They drank the laudanum and waited for death to take them. 

1  

00:56:17

So obviously they didn't search them. And so she was all courses 

0  

00:56:23

Inter that, wow, it failed. Oh, bless on the morning of the hanging. They tried again, and Anna stabbed herself in the abdomen with a small knife, and then Jeroboam did the same Anna's wound was fatal, but the jailers were able to save Jeroboam for the gallows. 5,000 people were gathered in Frankfurt, witnessed the execution of Jeroboam Beauchamp. As he was taken to the gallows, he raised the curtains on the wagon so that he could wave at the onlookers. Nice at the execution grounds, the crowd gathered expected Beauchamp to address them and possibly proclaim his innocence maybe again, but he declined. 

0  

00:57:08

Instead. He asked for a glass of water and requested that the band play the lively real bona party's retreat from Moscow. When he had heard enough Beauchamp stood up and at one 30 in the afternoon, on June 16th, 1826, he was executed by hanging the confessions of Jeroboam Beauchamp were finally published after the execution and laid the foundation, or depending on your stance on the murder, the myth of the Kentucky tragedy, the story inspired dozens of novels and dramas, including the Polish, not politician, the Polish one, which is an unfinished play by Edgar Allen Poe, which sets the story in 16th century, Rome, none of these adaptations were successful probably because the story drew from what was already like a work of fiction, Jeroboam left behind the following instructions for the couples burial quote. 

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00:58:10

We do not wish our faces uncovered after we are shrouded, particularly after we are removed to Bloomfield, we wish to be placed with my wife's head on my right arm and that confined round upon her bosom a month before the execution, Anna Beauchamp wrote an epitaph or the tombstone tombstone inscription for the tombstone. And she tried to have it published in a newspaper to gain some sympathy for the couple. The epitaph was not published until after their deaths. This is what is on the tombstone of deer untuned below and others' arms. 

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00:58:54

The husband and wife pose safe from life's never ending storms and safe from all their cruel foes, a child of evil fate. She lived a villain's Wiles. Her peace had crossed the husband of her heart revived, the happiness she had long lost her heart. Her tale of matchless, woe, and burning for revenge. He rose and laid her base. Seducer low and struck dismay to virtuous foes reader. If honors generous blood air warms that I breast here drop it's here and let the sympathetic flood deep in thy mind is treasured bear, a father or a mother thou thy daughter grew in griefs despair, then turn and see the villain low. 

0  

00:59:43

And here let the fall, gratefuls hear a brother or a sister though. Dishonored see this, this Then turn and see the villain lo and her let all the grateful tier daughter averse you moist die tear this tomb of love and honor claim for the eye defense. The husband here laid down and youth his lie and fame, his wife. Distained a life for Lauren without her hearts loved honored. Lord then reader here, the fortunes mourn who for their lives, their blood 

1  

01:00:24

Poured, 

0  

01:00:27

The burial instruct inscription was followed by. 

1  

01:00:30

I'm sorry. I'm sorry. 

0  

01:00:31

Jeroboam and Anna Beauchamp were buried together in a single coffin in maple Grove cemetery in Bloomfield, Kentucky, and his epitaph is engraved on the headstone. 

1  

01:00:42

No, it is a site. I mean, y'all come on. I mean, I understand if you want a little verse, you want a little something that is too much. I mean, how much money did that cost? Did they charge per letter per line? Per what? I mean y'all come up. It's a lot too much, a lot like 

0  

01:01:11

Currently see, because the photo is not super well, but that's, that's the tombstone, this ridiculous. It is literally a novel on a tombstone. That's ridiculous. So yeah, that is the story of the Beauchamp shark tragedy or the Kentucky tragedy. Whichever 

1  

01:01:29

Way for that beforehand. 

0  

01:01:31

I don't know. Didn't say then say a bunch of crazies, 

1  

01:01:35

But yes, 

0  

01:01:36

He, they were buried with her head on his right arm and his hand on her breast. That was, 

1  

01:01:46

They are, I mean, I am very sorry for all of the things that transpired that crazy 

0  

01:02:03

Insane 

1  

01:02:04

Day, right? I mean, I'm sorry. That, and how much older than him 

0  

01:02:14

Was she? She was 17 years older. 

1  

01:02:17

She would have been her child. Yeah. 

0  

01:02:19

She, he was 18 when he met her and died like within just a few years. I mean, it is, come on, you know, that song down to, you know, good old country. It's, it's quite, it's quite the tale. It, it it's a lot. I mean, I have no words for it, honestly, and that epitaph just is too much. It's too much. 

0  

01:02:59

But I mean, I guess, I don't know. I guess back then, if you died by execution, do they have to like, well, no, because in a lot of cases they don't, I was going to say, do they have to honor your death wishes, but oh gosh, maybe somebody has to flip the bill. Well, we don't have an appetite, but we have a website where you can find any and all information. You were looking for it as one nation under crime.com. We are one nation under crime on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube, and at, oh, in UC pod on Twitter. If you love our podcast, as much as we do. And we know you do or even more, if that's possible or even love us as much as Jeroboam love Danna, but please don't be crazy. 

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01:03:41

Like we don't need up to task and cute. Then leave us a five star review on apple podcasts. Let us know about it. We'll send you a prize. We do have a Patrion. If you would like to help with the cost of making and hosting the show, we would greatly appreciate it. Just search for one nation under crime. Thank you guys for listening to this week's episode of one nation under crime, we will see you here. Same time, different crime next week. And remember there isn't always Liberty and justice for all. Nope, goodbye.