Dec. 13, 2021

1829: The Patty Cannon Gang


Remember back in the Lavinia Fisher episode we mentioned that she is likely NOT the first female serial killer in the United States? Well, Patty Cannon has officially claimed that title in our book.

This week the ONUC gals discuss the Underground Railroad, the Reverse Underground Railroad, and the crimes of the Patty Cannon Gang. This episode is heavy to say the least. All of the topics the gals cover have an aspect of sadness to them due to the fact that this is a true crime podcast. However, this one is different. Be prepared for heavy conversation and to feel complete outrage. You know by now that Kayla and Leah don't hold back their opinions on injustices towards others and the Reverse Underground Railroad is no exception.   

Trigger Warning Level: Low to Medium

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Sources: All Things Interesting, Murderpedia, and Murder By Gaslight

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Transcript

You are listening to one nation under crime, a historical chronological, true crime podcast. Each week we go through our nation's history and discuss one case from each year starting in 1800. I'm Kayla and 

1  

00:00:13

I'm Leah 

0  

00:00:15

We're to episode 31. And we're also just getting closer to Christmas. I mean, 

1  

00:00:20

Getting close is coming 

0  

00:00:22

To, to enclose asked me if I started shopping yet. Oh 

1  

00:00:25

No. You give me heart palpitations. I'm almost, 

0  

00:00:30

I have one present. Oh Joel, only one. I have one. 

1  

00:00:35

Oh my gosh. I'm almost 

0  

00:00:36

Done. And I can't, 

1  

00:00:39

I mean, I start like December 26th for the next year though. I'm one of those people. 

0  

00:00:45

No, I have one present and it was because it was a really, really good deal for black Friday and it was for my boyfriend. So kill me. 

1  

00:00:55

You don't have my present yet. 

0  

00:00:56

I don't have your present yet. It's funny. It's funny of you to assume that I would honestly, I've 

1  

00:01:01

Had yours for months. 

0  

00:01:04

I like to get in the holiday season. Go shop. And then, I mean, oh, that's too much pressure. Nope, I like it. 

1  

00:01:11

Thanks. He, that just means, I think about people that I love throughout the year. Oh, she would like, he would like, and then there's not as much pressure when it comes time at the end of the year. That's that's too much pressure for me. I mean, I'll be living on Xanax 

0  

00:01:27

If I just see, because what would happen? Here's here's my thing. One. I've already contemplated giving my boyfriend his Christmas present because it's just sitting there and it's bothering me. And I've only had it now in my position for two days. 

1  

00:01:42

Oh, it was stored in my basement from new 

0  

00:01:45

To if I buy presents for people, I want to give them to them then, because there's a really good chance. I'll forget one. I'll forget about the present. 

1  

00:01:57

I have a present spot that I put presence 

0  

00:02:00

Too. I have a small child that can get through things. Three. There's a good chance that I would at some point say something about the present. Not remembering that I had not given it to you yet. 

1  

00:02:17

We'll see. I have nieces and nephews. 

0  

00:02:21

Yeah. You'd rather not have very many sister. I just got a few. So for me, it's not normal. 

1  

00:02:27

Mom, dad, in-laws friends. I've got all the, all the people. And so, I mean, if I don't start early, that's a whole lot at one time. And I have a designated present place that I put and birthday presents Christmas presents. They all go in the same place. And so at the appropriate time, I go to the present place and I get out the appropriate plat present for said, person couldn't do it. I have to have two because there are so many people that I love. And I love to give gifts gifts. 

0  

00:03:06

Oh, I love to give gifts. See, but that's the thing is like over the summer, my boyfriend left because he mentioned in passing that he needed, like, it was just one of those things. He was putting on a pair of shorts. He was like, man, I need to get some new shorts. Well, I went and bought him like four pairs of shorts. Cause that's just like, oh, you said, and I know him. He won't go get it himself. And so stuff like that, like we were not that it's like necessarily for him, but he made a comment. We were staining the kitchen and he was cooking. Cause he's the cook and God. And he was like, I need a fish flipper. Yeah. Cause they're different. Yes. 

0  

00:03:46

He's like, I need a fish flip like this. He, no, the comment was, this would be so much easier if I had a fish flipper. Well, I just ordered it on Amazon and it was here in two days and I was like, here you go. Yeah. Here's your fish flipper. Like, here you go. Yeah. And so that's like, that's when I remember things because there are things throughout the year that like, I'll go, oh, I need that. Or I like, but I don't think to put it on a lit, like my boyfriend asked me for a list the other day and I was like, oh, you're going to have to give me some time to find 

1  

00:04:21

Amazon lists. I mean, 

0  

00:04:22

I have my Amazon list, but my Amazon list is kind of things of like, oh, that would be kind of nice, but I don't want it as like a present 

1  

00:04:31

Update Melissa all the time. And I tell my family, Hey, my Amazon list is up to date. How about yours? Yeah. Christmas shopping. You got your Amazon, this set today. 

0  

00:04:40

I need it. My boyfriend doesn't love Amazon either. He's ordered some things from there and he's gotten some things on there for me. Like for my birthday, he shopped off of my Amazon list. I had put specific things on there that I wanted for my birthday. And I kinda knew which ones he would go for. But like, yeah. I just, I don't know. I just feel like I can't do it too early. And then, you know, the thing is have a seven year old now at this point, cause this will come out after her birthday a little Sagittarius bless her. 

0  

00:05:20

So 

1  

00:05:21

I birthday's the day that my sister gets to sing in the wedding. 

0  

00:05:25

It's true. So I have her who like she looks through, like if there's presents under the tree, she wants to know exactly what it is like, who's that for? And now she can, she can read, like she's getting to that point. She's very good. She can spell people. It was very impressive. And she can spell number. Very impressive. Keep in mind guys. She's she six? It's very impressive. She's doing cookie shrimp. Very well reading. And so she like, now she can read the tags, so that's dangerous. And then she always asks like what's in it. 

0  

00:06:07

And I'm like, you can't tell you, even if it's for someone else, because like she'll say something. So that's my life. And then usually when she's like at her dad's house, that's when I bring out all the wrapping paper and like wrap presents for one entire night to get it all done. 

1  

00:06:28

We pay girls from the youth group to wrap our presence because I don't like sitting in the floor and hurting up. 

0  

00:06:34

I don't mind it. I like decorating the, the presence take decorator. I'm good at it. And I go and do it. 

1  

00:06:44

And yeah, sitting in the floor, you know, oh Mike, and back, I'm old. And around this time there, a lot of people, a lot of people have stuff for the guys in the youth group to do, but there aren't as many things that people get the girls in a youth ministry and they need to make money too. You know? And so I'm like, Hey, y'all want to wrap some presents. 

0  

00:07:05

I said, well, here's the thing too. This is another thing that I do because sometimes 

1  

00:07:10

As she's pointing her finger at me guys, 

0  

00:07:12

Sometimes I don't label presence. Sometimes mentally I assign a wrapping paper because in that that's actually what I might do this year because of wool mess, press. And so sometimes 

1  

00:07:27

Clothes wrap presents at your house. 

0  

00:07:31

It just depends on how Santa is feeling that year. Sometimes, usually Santa will leave one thing out and, or like a usually Cena puts one big thing out and then Santa wraps all the other. 

1  

00:07:43

I find it very interesting that sometimes in some people's houses, Cena rat presence and in some people's houses saying I didn't send a never wrapped presence at my house. I guess I was kinda on the, the last scene of this 

0  

00:07:57

Santa. Yeah. It just really depends on well, and I think it depends on like the type of present that it is like last year Santa brought Ellie a bike. And so like, yeah, you can't really wrap that around 

1  

00:08:12

Any wrap presents from Santa, but my husband always had wrapped presents from Santa when he was growing up. 

0  

00:08:17

Maybe. I don't know. 

1  

00:08:19

I think it's the ELPs that you're assigned. Like if, if they lie, cause like I'm not a big rapper. That's true. So maybe that's 

0  

00:08:26

Maybe that's what it is. Maybe the elves don't really like wrapping things that much. I mean, it makes sense honestly, but yeah. We'll see how Santa feels this year. Who knows what we'll bring her anyways. We'll give you that light note before we get into this upset trail, run 

1  

00:08:46

Back guys. You're 

0  

00:08:48

Welcome. We are in the year of 1829 this week and our sources a few interesting, well, one interesting website that is literally called all the all that's interesting.com. Well, there you go is in the name. It is. Then we have murder pedia, amine, and murder by Gaslight. Hi Brad. It's been a while since I've said hello to Brad. I know he's out there. No, I know he's checking in. So NSA agent Brad, she's gotten real bitter lately. He's he's he's giving him any new material. He's passive aggressive. 

0  

00:09:29

It's rude. So the events in 1829 March 2nd, the new England asylum for the blind opened in Boston, Massachusetts. It was the first school in the U S specifically for deaf and blind students. March 4th, Andrew Jackson was sworn in as the seventh president of the United States and John C. Calhoun was sworn in for his second term as vice president of the United States during the inaugural ball for president Jackson, a crowd mobbed, the white house. Yep. So March 16th, was it an angry crowd or says a crowd mobbed him. 

0  

00:10:11

So I'm assuming it's not a good one. I don't know. March 16th, Ohio authorized high school night classes. Those interesting June 1st, the Philadelphia Enquirer was founded as the Pennsylvania inquire. It is the third oldest continuously operating daily newspaper in the U S it's a mouthful. It was long July 23rd, William Austin Burt obtained the first patent for a typewriter. 

1  

00:10:47

Very nice. I'm so glad I don't have to use typewriters. 

0  

00:10:51

Yeah. So glad August 15th to the 22nd Cincinnati, right? The Cincinnati riots of 1829 occurred also called the Cincinnati race war of 1829. It was triggered by competition for jobs between Irish immigrants and black Americans. We almost covered that, but it was kind of hard to find a lot of good information. Yeah. 

1  

00:11:23

The Irish were treated as second class citizens, right? 

0  

00:11:28

Correct. So it was just, it was really hard to find information on that. But August 25th, president Andrew Jackson made an offer to buy Texas from the Mexican government, but they said, no fam we're good. December 21st, the first stone arch railroad bridge in the United States was dedicated in Baltimore, Maryland. I always like those. They're pretty. They are pretty and an undated events, which we talked about this in the last episode that gold was found in Lufkin county, Georgia. Well, the year of 1829 was the Georgia gold rush. 

0  

00:12:08

And it was the country's actual first in that significant gold rush. And you hear gold rush. You think California, and nobody really talks about the Georgia gold rush, but that was where gold was originally found for the United States. Our births in 1829, may eight, we have Louis Moreau got strong. That is a name right there. Composer and pianist. He was a Taurus. September 12th, Charles Dudley Warner was born. He's an essayist novelist and friend of mark Twain. Well, he was a Virgo like you, not me, October 15th, ASAP hall. 

0  

00:12:52

The third was an American astronomer who is best known for having discovered the two moons of Mars that are named. I believe it's demos and Phobos well, there you go. Hazel Libra. You heard it here, guys. You heard it here first. Probably not first few years later, December 8th, Henry Tim rod now was born. He was an American poet and he was a Sagittarius. There we go. Our deaths in 1829, February 18th, we have Hannah Tompkins. She was the second lady of the United States from 1807 to 1817. So she was not the first lady. 

0  

00:13:35

She was the second lady. She's the vice president's wife, April 11th, Archibald Gracie. Which just one just sounds like a Regal name to begin with Archibald Gracie, like, and I mean insane. It always reminds me of Mr. Gracey from the haunted mansion. But because I mean, why not? I love the high, one of my favorite. I get to go there very soon. Favorite it's my all time. Favorite ride at Disney world fun fact for anyone who wants to know it's my all-time favorite ride and one of my favorite Disney movies. And I introduced my daughter to it this year. 

0  

00:14:16

Cause it was, I mean, it's not scary, but I can see how some parts of it are kind of dark. How'd that guest, she loves it. It's one of her favorite movies. She's your child she's so my child, so anyways, Archibald Gracie died on April 11th. He is a Scottish born shipping magnet and an early American businessmen Gracie mansion, which we discussed. I believe back in episode one, Gracie mansion is now the residents of the mayor of New York city. 

0  

00:14:55

June 27th, James Smithson died. He was a British mineralogist and chemist. He is the one who left an endowment of a hundred thousand pounds to fund the Smithsonian institution in Washington, DC. Wow, crazy. So thank you to him as wow. Like I said, we are in 1829 this year and from 1821 to 1829 or the main years that we're dealing with for this Patty cannon was an infamous name around the Delmarva peninsula. 

0  

00:15:37

She was an active ruthless participant ruthless in the reverse underground railroad. Oh reverse. She is possibly by my standards, the first female serial killer in America. Oh, cause we discussed with Lavinia Fisher. Yeah, she might. She might've just robbed people. There was no evidence that she killed her one. There's no evidence. So like while people went missing from there, there was no evidence that she was the murder. It could have been her husband while that's an accessory that doesn't make you the murderer. 

0  

00:16:19

She wasn't the mastermind. But a lot of people coined Patty cannon as the first official female serial killer of the United States. Oh dear. It's it's rough guys. I want to go ahead and put this in here because I had a interesting time researching this for a few reasons. And I believe we talked about this back in episode three and I did ask a lot of other podcast creators who are people of color. And I asked them specifically, if I am discussing before a certain time period, what is acceptable? 

0  

00:17:02

Do you say black Americans? Do you say black African-Americans because at this time you don't know. Yeah. And so that was my question is I said, you know, what is the best way to, and I asked, I sent it out into the Twitter sphere, but one of our lovely podcasts that follows us reverie, true crime with Paige, she's amazing. Go listen to her. She retweeted it. And she kind of added a lot of podcasts that are people of color and ask and like said I've heard black Americans, but these are all people of color that all have podcasts. 

0  

00:17:47

Maybe they have some insight and there was some really good insight into it. And that's why I want to go ahead. And I want to say it here because I wanted to be very socially conscious of this. Right. We never want to say the wrong thing. We're very aware. You'll know how, how much we tiptoe around native American. So like how much we've talked about that. So this is yet another instance where I asked, I said, how, how would you like, this is what we're talking about this week. In this episode. I don't know whether some of these people are black Americans or whether they're black African-Americans and, or like just African-Americans in general. 

0  

00:18:33

And as we've discussed before, a lot of people who are blocked, don't like being referred to as an African-American because they're not African-American they're American. Right. And so I always want to be really aware and conscious of that because I mean, just like I was speaking to them and they were all so unbelievably kind, I had several podcasts that like tweeted back and said, you know, this is what I prefer. This is what I think is the best. And kind of universally, everyone said just black is the best way to go about that is to just say black. 

0  

00:19:13

I, you know, and a lot of them said, I am black. You don't have to preface it with I'm a black American. Right. And, and which made perfect sense because like I said to them, I said, that does make perfect sense because I don't say that I'm a white American. Right. So it made perfect sense to me, but it's like, I told them, I always, we're never going to make everyone happy and we knew never. But if I have an ability and I have a platform of which I'm going to be speaking to a lot of people, I want to make sure that one, we are educated and what we were speaking on to the best of our knowledge, we're never going to know everything either. And also that anybody who does listen to the podcast feels inclusive of their self. 

0  

00:19:58

Like we, we want, we always want this to be a podcast that is approachable to everyone. Like we've said, we, you know, whether, whether you're gay, whether you're straight, whether you're asexual, I mean, you know, like we don't care. You could be. I think the thing on a tic talk that they say is she's days and gays, which is just funny to me, cause there'll be like this, this one is for the she's days end gaze. So, you know, like we just always want, we always want everybody to talk to people just right. Are you a people? Okay, well this is for you because we, you know, we've talked about in a lot of episodes, mental health is a very important thing to us. 

0  

00:20:39

And so that is also something that we discuss. And that's always something that we want people to understand. And to like I put on our Thanksgiving posts on Instagram, if y'all, didn't see it, I, you know, I just sat on there. Like, you know, we understand Thanksgiving is a really hard time for some people, because you may have a family that's not accepting of whatever it is. You changed your major and your family's really hard on you. Like you came out this year and your family's hard on you. Like, we understand that those are situations that are not to go to college anymore. Right. You know, or just whatever, or say, you know, you were dating someone like I've had a lot of people that unfortunately were dating someone of a different race than them and had very big issues with Thanksgiving. 

0  

00:21:23

And it's like I said, they're like, whether this is the day you celebrate or you don't, it doesn't matter. Like just be with the people that you love, period, regardless of who that is. And just always know that like Leah and I love you. We, we don't know your specific situation, but we're always here. We don't want anyone to ever feel left out in, in this world because that's, that's unfortunate and we would never want that to be put on ourselves. So that is the reason why I really try in these conversations to make sure where that, whatever I'm saying is accurate and is not what I think is best, but what a community, as a whole thinks is best. 

0  

00:22:09

So during this episode, there are going to be times where I do refer to someone as just black, because it's not clear whether they are an enslaved person or a free person. Okay. But what I was told by her name is Tamara. She has a podcast as well. She's amazing what Tamara said. And it made a lot of sense. She said, I would just approach it by saying enslaved people and free people. And she says, she made a good point. She said, while there were white indentured servants at the time, she said, every time you say slave that's where somebodies mind goes. And she said, yeah. 

0  

00:22:50

And so her podcast name it's, she has a podcast. She also has a new brand that she just came out with that she starting, which is also very good as well. But it's, it's a clever name, Tamara, till the break of Dawn ha podcast. And she she's a professional development and coach and, and things like that. And so she does a lot of stuff on her podcast. She talks about a lot of mental health things like what you do, but also development and in different people's lives. And she's got a lot of episodes. She's like up to a hundred. Oh wow. 

0  

00:23:31

And then she also just launched a new brand that she is starting. And I believe honestly, like the website just launched like a couple of days ago. And I hope that I say it right, but it's called melanin toxic, kate.com like intoxicated, but melon, intoxicate. Okay. And so it is a great really for anyone, but it is geared towards people of color and she specifically aims to empower black women. And so a lot of it is, is, you know, dealing with that. And it is just melanin toxic Kate. 

0  

00:24:11

So it's melanin toxic Kate, like not, yeah. So smashing yes. Smashes the two together. And she's got a lot of products. She's also got stuff for kids too. So she's just really about female empowerment, especially for the black community and for, you know, men as well. So she says that her brand is a brand that was birthed from our desire to want to celebrate the beauty found within melanated people. So, so that would probably should listen to her. She's she's very, very sweet. And she was one, she was one of the main ones. And what's funny is everyone who was replying because she was the first one that replied. 

0  

00:24:54

She didn't say fellow can Syrian her birthday is the day after mine look at their new, she was a good person. So, but what was funny is a lot of people would, you know, reply and they would go, I agree with what Tamara said and you know, added on. So a lot of people, you know, agreed with her as well. And so that's what she said. So during, you know, while I talk about this, that's kind of why I do those things is because I did kind of take a poll of the community to see how do you want me to do this? We'll never make everyone happy, but we try, we try the best. So we're here to be educated and to somewhat try and we do the best and you, yes, we do. 

0  

00:25:39

So we are going to get on to our location for the week. And instead of a specific city, we are going to be talking about a region, a region, the Delmarva peninsula. It is a large peninsula on the east coast, the United States. And for anyone who doesn't know, a peninsula is a landform surrounded by water on most of its border while being connected to mainland from which it extends a majority of the state of Delaware and parts of the Eastern shore regions of Maryland and Virginia make up the Delmarva peninsula. The peninsula is 170 miles long, 70 miles wide, and is bordered by the Chesapeake bay on the west Pocomoke sound on the Northwest and the Delaware river on the east. 

0  

00:26:30

The name Delmarva comes from a combination of Delaware, Maryland, Virginia. Well, there you go. Dover Delaware is the peninsula's largest city by population, but the land that is now Delaware was first colonized by the Dutch east India company. We've discussed them before and the British in 1631. And it was called Zwan indel. Well now not spelled how it sounds, which comes from the archaic Dutch word for Swan valley. Well, I just thought that was pretty. That is more lovely than yes. 

0  

00:27:10

You said before Swan valley Zwan and Dell, which would make is one. Yeah, but Swan valley. I just thought that was a pretty, pretty way to describe a place. The colony only lasted for a year and in 1638, new Sweden was established and it colonized the Northern part of the state with the Delaware valley. The area continued to change hands between the Dutch and the British for white. Sometime the peninsula became a prime location for farming during the 19th and 20th centuries, they produce quite a lot of tomatoes, green beans, corn and soybeans. In fact, queen Anne's county is the largest producer of soybeans in Maryland. 

0  

00:27:52

Eastern shore is known for poultry and is home to Purdue farms. So anybody that's in America, that's a lot of people. Those were chicken, like the brand of chicken. There is also a rare breed of chicken called a Delaware that was created in the peninsula. Interesting. It's very interesting. They're, they're really kind of cute, but they're called Delaware and they're Delaware chickens. The Delmarva shorebirds are a minor league baseball team in Salisbury, Maryland. And for those who don't know all minor league teams have an MLB major league baseball affiliation, like where we are. 

0  

00:28:38

We have the barons, which are the white Sox, but the Delmarva shorebirds, which makes perfect sense is affiliated with the Baltimore Orioles. Well, that makes sense. So who are the mobile biscuits? The Montgomery biscuits. I'm not sure who the Montgomery biscuits have biscuits biscuits. That's always a, a fun game when they come to town, the Montgomery biscuits. So yeah, that's us guys crazy. We have the Birmingham barons. We do fun biscuits, fun fact, Michael Jordan played for the Birmingham burns. 

0  

00:29:19

And if you watch the movie space jam, when he is at the very beginning, when he is playing baseball, he's playing at the Hoover mint, correct. That's where that was filmed. So during this day, yes, it was very interesting. Cause I saw it and I was like, oh, I know that place. Ooh, wait a minute. I know that place. My daughter also loves space jam, which I just found hilarious. I know as many of these cases go with this time, there isn't much that I could find about her early life, no birth date, not even a from birth year and her first name isn't even set in stone. 

0  

00:29:58

Nice. So her name, she sketchy from the get, go from the jump. Let me tell you her name was either Lucretia. I don't feel sorry for or Martha and her. I know me, but I think it could be Luke Lacretia because her middle name was Patricia. So I don't know. I don't know. A lot of people like actually refer to her as like Lucretia. So anyways, either way we do know that our middle name was Patricia. Her last name was Hanley. 

0  

00:30:39

She was born possibly around 1760 in maybe Canada. Most sources say her first name is Lucretia, but some also have Martha either way. She went by Patty. So she's an alien. She is just, she wrote a pamphlet titled. And this is why I think it's correct. So I'm not real sure. I think she might've used Martha as an alias at one point, but she wrote a pamphlet titled narrative and confessions of Lucretia P cannon, which was published after her death in 1841. So Lucretia, Patricia Lucretia, Patricia bless it. 

0  

00:31:22

She went by Patty. According to this pamphlet, Patty's father was LP handling and he was of British nobility until his father disowned him for being drunk and secretly marrying a sex worker. Oh, Hanley and his wife moved to Montreal and started a smuggling operation between Montreal and towns in New York and Vermont. Their story goes along the lines of the fishers. We talked about Lavinia Fisher where they had an Inn and a Tavern. So the Hanley seemed to be a great couple. And you know, the neighbors saw them as like a pretty respectable family. 

0  

00:32:06

Little did they know what the Hanley's were actually up to an acquaintance of the couple named Alexander Payne found out about their nefarious activities and threatened to turn them in? Well, Mr. Handling couldn't have that. And he decided that pain had to be killed. Oh, bit of a trigger warning. Just a couple seconds. He split pain's head open with an ax and decided to flee just a bit of a trigger warning. Authorities captured LP Hanley before he could get away. And he was executed and hanged for murder. 

0  

00:32:47

Now, miss Hanley was left on her own and needed to support herself. She should go back to her old ways. So she opened a quote house of entertainment for persons traveling for pleasure. Oh, and carried on the family tradition of teaching her daughters, the art of deceiving men, and then marrying them off young. Nice. I couldn't find the exact number of daughters that she had, but she at least had to, because everything refers to Patty as the younger daughter, oh one day a man wandered into the end. And he was very ill and it wasn't long until Ms. 

0  

00:33:28

Hanley figured out that he was very wealthy after finding that out. Ms. Hanley insisted on nursing the man back to help. How kind of her right. She's a giver. The man's name was Alonzo. Jesse Cannon. He was a Wheelwright from Delaware wheel rights were for anybody. They were craftsmen that actually made wooden wheels. Like the ones that you think of when you think of a wooden wheel and I can wheel. Yes. Even though Ms. Hanley was the one who said she wanted to nurse the man back to help, she was pushing for a relationship to blossom between Jesse and Patty. 

0  

00:34:09

She was probably ever worked with managing the whole big operation. So speak place daughter. Yeah. I needed to take care of have focused her attention better. Right? So she would regularly encourage Patty to check in on Jesse. Then when Jesse was healthy enough to go back home, Ms. Hanley convinced Jesse to marry Patty and take her home with him. Patty was 16 at the time that we know of, for sure could not get an exact age on Jesse. The newly married couple settled in a town is right on the Maryland border. The couple had two children together, but only three years later, Jesse died his health sickness, recurred it's, it's interesting. 

0  

00:34:59

His health started failing seemingly out of nowhere and he progressively got worse. I couldn't find an official cause of death, but once people got to know the real Patty, they suspected that she poisoned him. The other rumor was that he had died of grief over an unpleasant marriage Patty's behavior. After her husband's death was also a major red flag because she went wild. What about her children? We'll get there. Oh dear. She first became a barmaid and that wasn't working out. So she moved on to sex work and started making plans for her own end. 

0  

00:35:40

Like her mother's oh, no whale. This didn't work out for her either. And with her being described as having an unpleasant demeanor, it's not really a surprise by 24. Patty was considered a bit too old to grab the attention of men in order to make money. Her thoughts for being a Madam were crushed. So she opened a Tavern called Joe Johnson's Tavern. By this time Patty's daughters were old enough to marry. And one of her son-in-laws was named Joe Johnson. It was with his help that the Tavern opened. Supposedly the Tavern was thought to be on the line of Delaware and Maryland, which was convenient for Patty because whenever states authorities came in, she would take a few steps to the other side and be outside of their jurisdiction. 

0  

00:36:37

Again like Linnea Fisher, Patty would size up the men coming into the Tavern to decide if they had anything that was worth having for herself. If they did, then there were two options. Patty would shoot her, stab them and bury the body in the backyard. Or if there were too many witnesses, she would let them leave. Patty would then dress as a man, take her gang with her and Rob the traveler on the highway. Well, it was rumored by her own gang that Patty had her own graveyard. Oh, ma. So Delaware was an interesting place at the time while it is technically a Northern state, there were still enslaved people in the state, but only 4% of the state's population were considered slaves and 20% were free. 

0  

00:37:32

These statistics made it an attractive location for freed slaves. It also simultaneously made this area where they were at a higher risk of being kidnapped. Unfortunately, this is the business that Patty cannon went after next in the article from all that's interesting. They quote a historian Richard Bell who said the illegal slave trade gave women the opportunity to quote, leverage familial relations with male conductors and station agents on this reverse underground railroad in order to secure their own passage through an otherwise treacherous and decidedly homosocial world. 

0  

00:38:17

Basically they use their feminine Wiles to get information. By the time of this case, the reverse underground railroad was not a new concept. Beginning in the 1780s, the illegal slave trade was one of the largest components of the criminal. We have not discussed the underground road yet, and now is as good a time as any. I told Joel told y'all we get to it. The underground railroad was a network of secret routes and safe houses established in the United States in the late 17 hundreds and early 18 hundreds. It was primarily used by slaves to escape into free states. 

0  

00:38:57

And then into Canada, the underground railroad really ramped up when the fugitive slave act of 1793 was enacted this act required officials and free states to assist slaveholders in returning slaves back to their owners. But while the federal government can enact certain laws, individual state legislatures can prohibit the law in their state at this time. So there were states who refuse to take place in the fugitive slave act. Then there were citizens who just ignored the law. 

0  

00:39:41

And it's because of all of these things that the underground railroad thrived, typical routes ran from the south to the north and into Canada. And it consisted of meeting points, safe houses, transportation, and secret routes maintained by abolitionist sympathizers. And they communicated by word of mouth almost exclusively unless they passed an encrypted message, which used a numeric code to communicate or quilts. And I don't think that I put in exactly what the quilts were for here, but there were different patterns of the quilts and the women would go out and they would hang it over the fence. And based on the color or the pattern, it would tell them where to either go next or whether it was safe to come inside or what to do. 

0  

00:40:29

So it was just a visual signal, right? It was very, very interesting. It was very clever, very clever, very intricate. And it's simple at the same time since railways were the main mode of mass transportation at the time, the terminology of the railroad was the basis of underground railroad terms, agents or shepherds or people who helped enslaved people find the railroad conductors were guides way stations or just stations were locations to hide station masters hid and housed enslaved people in their homes, passengers for the enslaved people, themselves tickets were what was obtained by enslaved people basically to get a ticket to leave like they were, they wanted to purchase a ticket is what they would say. 

0  

00:41:26

And stockholders who clearly were just financial benefactors. The reason this was successful and not easily infiltrated is because many people only knew their contribution or role and not the entire route. The right 

1  

00:41:42

Hand didn't know, the left hand 

0  

00:41:43

Was doing. Canada was referred to as the promised land or heaven. And the railroad itself was the freedom train and slave people traveled at night. And there were typically 10 to 20 miles between each station. They would then rest at the station. They reached and word would be sent ahead to the next station that passengers would be coming to them. The next night, a majority of these stations were in basements, barns, churches, or even caves. Leah's favorite. One of the most notable figures associated with the underground railroad is Harriet Tubman. After going through the railroad herself, she strongly felt she needed to go back and get her family out as well. 

0  

00:42:25

She's fascinating. And we do not have a lot of times to talk about her, but I I'm hoping eventually we'll be able to circle back 

1  

00:42:33

The amazing the bravery at his people. It's just, I mean, and to, and to have gone through it and, and her, especially to go back and, and go through it again. I mean, just the bravery and just understand that 

0  

00:42:48

It's the tenacity of it all is just like it's, it's crazy. Amazing to me. Over 11 years, she returned to the Eastern shore of Maryland. Keep in mind, this is also where Patty cannon was. So there's a good chance that they might have crossed paths. So she returned to the Eastern shore of Maryland repeatedly and she rescued around 70 enslaved people and about 13 separate expeditions herself. So she was taking the trip back and forth herself is it's just amazing. Once she provided specific instructions to an additional 50 to 60 enslaved people to escape to the north. 

0  

00:43:38

So now that we have discussed the underground railroad, we can get into the reverse underground I 

1  

00:43:45

Have never heard of, and I'm already angry. 

0  

00:43:48

This, you will, you will be angry. 

1  

00:43:52

I mean, just, you put reverse in front of railroad and I'm angry. 

0  

00:43:58

Yeah. I was very enraged reading a lot of it. So this was just like, it sounds the exact opposite of what we discussed before. It was a pre American civil war practice of kidnapping, fugitive slaves and freed slaves and free freed slaves in free states. And then transporting them back to slave states and either selling or being rewarded for returning a fugitive. It operated for 85 years from 17 to 1865. 

0  

00:44:45

People are not objects now are not livestock. People are not belongings. People are people. I mean, it's people are people it's very, w I'll talk about someone else in a second that we we've actually talked about in a previous episode, just as like a, he was kind of a bullet point and he was born and we, we talked about him so you can't sell people. I know the main difference is that instead of an intelligent network of people working together, the reverse was more known for just incidents that occurred. There were three types of kidnapping methods, physical abduction kidnapping through trickery in the apprehension of fugitives. 

0  

00:45:35

Kidnapping through trickery was one method that was known to be the most successful. And in these cases, the gangs would send in someone as bait, often a black person and have them promise alcohol work or money to these people. And once the target was lured away, they were kidnapped. I don't like this, sorry, but people are about to be, you're about to be really enraged. I'm already chewing on my nails and I just got done. It was especially easy to do this with children. I knew that was coming because kidnappers lured them with candy article one, section nine of the constitution, which banned the import of slaves beginning in 1808 was meant to limit the number of slaves in the country. 

0  

00:46:22

Instead they unknowingly created a higher demand for underground slave trade. Sure. In fact, the memoir and later film, 12 years a slave is about Solomon Northup who was born free in New York, then kidnapped and sold as a slave in new Orleans where he remained enslaved for 12 years, 12 years. And the way that they got him is because he was a violinist. He was actually very intelligent and he was a violinist and someone offered him a job in DC, right beside Maryland and Virginia and Delaware. 

0  

00:47:04

And he went and he was kidnapped. So that's, if you ever wanted to know about the reverse slave, the reverse underground railroad in and of itself, or, you know, the underground slave trade 12 years of slave is about that. So Patty recruited a black man named ransom to travel through towns and convince others to go with him. She also quote, purchased, okay. A seven year old boy named Siresh James that she used as a decoy. 

0  

00:47:46

She also had an agreement with a local brothel keeper that if any, any at all black person came into work or to obtain services, the keeper would hold them there for Patty to take with her. Wow. If the women had children and the children were deemed quote acceptable, oh, they were taken to, oh, 

1  

00:48:10

Acceptable. 

0  

00:48:12

Just a bit of, a bit of, a bit of a trigger here. This is a rough one. However, if the children were not acceptable or if they caused any trouble, they were killed and buried in a cave in the basement at the Tavern. 

1  

00:48:27

No, 

0  

00:48:30

They didn't just set their sights on enslaved and free people either. It was believed that many wealthy guests and even slave traders themselves were murdered in the Tavern, in the effort to steal money in horses from them. The Tavern was also outfitted with hidden brooms and trap doors to hold their captives until they were ready to leave. By this point, the gang had acquired a ship to make it easier for them to take a large amount of people. At one time, ransom would bring them in onto the ship where they lured them below deck and put them in hatches that were locked from the outside. Hold on, 

1  

00:49:05

What the make the kids unacceptable light. They weren't cute, 

0  

00:49:10

But they couldn't work. Or they were too sickly or they wouldn't get them a lot of money. I mean, they cried too much. I'm just, I mean, yes. I'm sorry. So continue. 

1  

00:49:25

I just, that just, 

0  

00:49:26

I'm sorry. When the gang was ready to transport their captives off the ship, they would shackle them together in a line and threaten them. If they spoke to anyone, Patty was known to be, especially for all, There is a story that is put in a lot of articles about Patty and you can go find it for yourself. If you would like, I would not lie. I can't talk about, I already read what happened. I don't want to know. I can say 

1  

00:50:03

She was not like 

0  

00:50:04

Jesus. I can say it involves a child. And just warning. If you try to go look for it, just warning of what you're getting yourself into. The only thing I will say is that it involves a child in fire. That's it? I will, I will not say anything else. 

1  

00:50:22

I will not be looking at this story. No, 

0  

00:50:24

It's, it's 

1  

00:50:25

Not like Patty 

0  

00:50:27

Ours. Our episode on the murder of George was rough. That was equally as rough. It was, I couldn't, I couldn't do it. Let's move along. The game, continued their criminal enterprise for 20 years from when they began. All, some people might've exaggerated the crimes done by them. It is said that the gang kidnapped at least 3000 enslaved free people, they committed 30 murders. And some say they even took all of their possessions and buried them around in different places. So they wouldn't get stolen. In 1822, Joseph Johnson was tried for taking a freed man from Delaware to Maryland, but he is the only member of the gang that was ever brought to court. 

0  

00:51:18

Why he was charged with kidnapping and his punishment was 39 lashes and being placed in the stocks. That's all keep in mind. Also Joseph Johnson was Patty's son-in-law yeah. Patty's daughter had a husband before Joseph Johnson, who was also involved in the reverse underground railroad. I don't know how she found two, but anyways, and he was actually, he had been hanged for murder by this point. And then she got remarried. So seven years later in 1829, a farmer on Patty's property found a blue chest full of bones. 

0  

00:52:00

It was believed to be the remains of a slave trader that went missing on this 10 years earlier. Then one of the members of the gang was captured by authorities. It was Siresh James that Patty used as a decoy when he was only seven, the authorities soon realized that Cyrus was simply upon and Patty schemes and they use his testimony to finally put Patty in jail. He did not go to jail. Well, that's good. When the authorities arrived to arrest Patty, the sheriff found 21 people in chains in the basement, and they were immediately freed Cyrus. 

0  

00:52:43

Also told authorities, there were several bodies buried on the property and under the house and under the house, he even told the under the house, he even told the authorities about the child who was murdered. I don't like this story. Yeah. It's, it's another one of those that people need to know about it because people don't talk. I mean, I didn't see a whole lot where people have actually outwardly spoken about. I mean, I saw, I found a lot of articles, but I don't know if this specifically was, 

1  

00:53:26

I mean, I discussed, I guess I knew that this 

0  

00:53:30

I've heard, but not the depths of it. Right. And this, I believe 

1  

00:53:39

It's been touched on and different things that I've seen, but not the numbers. The light. Yeah. 

0  

00:53:46

Yeah. I, and that's just her gang. 

1  

00:53:50

Like, not that there were people who did this and this, like, it wasn't just like one here, one there. 

0  

00:53:59

I agree. I, I also knew that this was when I found the name Patty cannon. I did not know. Cause a lot of times I'll find something for that year that I know is a case or a trial or something and I'll just put it on the spreadsheet. And then when I come to that year, finally is when I dig into the research. So I was not fully aware of what this story entailed. And I totally, I had a lot hotter research to do the past couple of weeks. And this one was honestly, probably the longest that I've ever had to research a case that we've done. 

0  

00:54:38

And it's, it's a case that I almost questioned myself on covering it. I'm 

1  

00:54:49

Glad you did, but I don't like it 

0  

00:54:52

Because I believe these are times when, you know, and we, we do know that this happens, but I believe this discussion in this case is something that could very easily be whitewashed to history. 

1  

00:55:08

Got people saying it, the Holocaust didn't happen. You know, and I know this isn't the exact same. Right. But it, it, it is a persecution of sorts. And I mean, it, it could very easily be 

0  

00:55:21

Exactly forgot. And I, we we've talked about it before, because we talked about George because no one had discussed. I couldn't find hardly anything on the murder of George. And that was one reason that I really wanted to cover his story. Because like I've said before, there are victims to these stories and their stories deserve to be heard 

1  

00:55:48

Just like on Evan Hanson, no one deserves to be forgotten, right? No one deserves to fade away. 

0  

00:55:54

And yes, it is very rough. It was it's. It was a very rough thing. There's a lot that I'm cutting out a 

1  

00:56:05

Lot. Thank you for cutting some things out. 

0  

00:56:08

I mean, it was, it w there were some things that were, we're going to talk about defeat, <em></em> coming up and it's going to be an episode. Lee is not going to be with us for a portion of the episode. It is in Leah has no clue who she is, but it is. She's one of the worst people in new Orleans. Yes. I've actually heard. Yes. See things that were done in her attic are irreparably Hensel animalistic. 

0  

00:56:56

And it was a hellscape like, it it's really rough. And Leah will not be with us for a portion of that because Leah has a very vivid imagination. And Kayla loves Leah. I have a very vivid imagination, and I've already had the privilege, I guess, of knowing about that case. And she's pretty bad. Defina Mallory, Patty cannon. I would put up with her and just reading some of the things that occurred was just, is it's one of those things that's terrifying that someone could even think of things like that. 

0  

00:57:43

It's terrifying that, like we say that today, like with serial killers, like, it's scary to think how these people's minds work, but it's even in it's even in the sense of not even that this person's mind worked in that sense, but that this person's mind specifically worked in that sense against a specific race of people, simply because of the color of their skin. And it has, and that is for them as a human. That is, that is what gets me is like, I, I, I don't understand that because I just don't. 

0  

00:58:29

Yeah. It's in for there to, I mean, it is a big, you know, topic that's gone on in our country for the past couple of years. And it's just not just a couple of years. Well, I mean, like, it's a no-no, but it's been ramped up. It's been a more, it's been a larger topic of conversation than it has been in the past. Like we, you know, police brutality, all of those things, which, you know, are heinous in and of themselves, you know, it's just for this woman to think of these things, jus just in general is terrible. 

0  

00:59:11

And I, like I said, I cut a lot of things out. So cause I was like, this needs to be heard, but not all those things to be heard. Cause it's it, there's a difference between telling a story and then I'm exploiting details. And I just, there are some times that I just can't like, I, I can't. And I appreciate, so she was finally, she was finally arrested. So Cyrus had told them about the bodies that were buried on the property and under the house. And he even told them the story about the child that was murdered. There is a small quote here. 

0  

00:59:52

It doesn't say anything extremely terrible at all, but it is something that he says, and it is a direct quote from him, which is why I put it in here. Keep in mind, Cyrus's block as well. That was why she quote purchased him because he was a young black child. Cyrus told the authorities quote, she took a black child, not dead yet out in her apron, but it never returned. He took them out to Patty's property to show them where the bodies fully were in her graveyard. And among them were three children. Patty was convicted of four counts of murder for four counts of murder. 

0  

01:00:35

And she was sentenced to death somehow, while Patty was in jail, she got her hands on poison and in the attempts to avoid a public execution, she took the poison to end her life. Keep in mind. Her father was also executed. I think that has reasons to them. What Patty didn't know is that the poison was not immediate. It's highly likely that it was arsenic. And she had to continue taking it day after day. The effects of the poison were drastic and she would be depressed one moment and screaming and rage the next, oh dear, she would go into trance-like fits where she would tear her clothes off, rip her own hair out and destroy anything she could put her hands on. 

0  

01:01:22

So she made herself go crazy. Yes. When she found herself in these types of fits, it took three men to hold her down and her depressed moments, she would cry and admit to her crimes and feel sorry for herself. And then the cycle would continue again. On the day that Patty would eventually die. She asked for a priest so she could repent and confess everything she had done. She told the priest that she had killed 11 people with her own hands and that she was an accessory to more than a dozen murders. She finally admitted to poisoning and killing her husband, Jesse. And this is another trigger warning. 

0  

01:02:07

I'm sorry. And she even admitted to strangling and killing one of her own children. And I will just say it was very, very, very, very, very, very young, oh dear, like three days. Oh, about an hour after her confession, the sheriff was doing rounds to check on the prisoners. Patty cannon was found dead in her cell on May 11th, 1829. And it is likely that she was 70 years old. There is a historical marker in reliance, Maryland that is located in front of Patty's house slash Joe Johnson Tavern. 

0  

01:02:48

But number one, why do we hate this marker in the first place? I mean, but I mean they maybe remember the victim based off of what the placard says. It doesn't seem like it to me. And that's what made me so mad is because I saw it and I'm like this lady. I remember her, I remember the victims, but, but number two, a PBS show called history, detective history, detectives determined that it is not the original house. It is on the same land, but the original house was torn down in 1948. 

0  

01:03:36

What's the reason that this is significant is because the historical marker specifically says Patty Cannon's house and it's not her house. So move the marker. I mean, it was the property, but it's not the house. Like, and so that was that's one thing that they do is they go around and try and figure these things out. Lee is going to love this bar sometime after Patty's death, her skull and the skull of her sister, Betsy were given to the bones. 

0  

01:04:16

Well, this was actually, this part was for a reason next nexus, the skull of her and her sister, Betsy were given to a phenologist and a phenologist. They focus on personality types and character. His name was oh, S Fowler. And he took them to study. He compared it to Betsy's because she was also prone to severe violence and deprived thoughts. The research was for his theory of something called heredity descent and stated that the sisters had quote, inherited both the destructive propensity of their father and the sexual passion of their mother. 

0  

01:05:00

Patty was buried outside the courthouse in Delaware and a Popper's grave until 1907. Her remains were relocated. And during the relocation, a courthouse employee took her skull by 1961, someone in the family either found the skull, or it was a few places called it, a family heirloom, which I just kind of found funny. I mean, it's like they said, even at one point that the skull was hanging up on like a nail in someone's barn. That makes me 

1  

01:05:37

Think of Chandler's crazy roommate. 

0  

01:05:41

It's it's okay. So they, the family ended up either way, late years later, they ended up donating it to the Dover library. 

1  

01:05:54

I didn't know whose skull at what? And like, oh, is he a serial killer Scott? 

0  

01:05:59

So the Dover library used to put 

1  

01:06:02

It out in your house. 

0  

01:06:05

The Dover library used to put it out every year around Halloween. And then once they decided they were going to put it up because they were afraid of decay or anything like that, currently it is sitting underground in storage, but it is on long-term loan to the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, DC. And that is where it is 

1  

01:06:30

Today. Barry, 

0  

01:06:33

The bowl, the person who has it, that's watching after it's the purse, they did a long-term loan to the Smithsonian and the person that's over that department is actually an anthropologist. And so they were sending it there because a lot of people are doing a lot of different studies like this for knowledge listed way back when about just personality and brain types and then also studying people's schools. So yeah, that is where Patty ended up 

1  

01:07:04

And then bury her. No, finish your steady, take all the measurements, then bury her. 

0  

01:07:11

They didn't bury her here again. Someone took her, marry her again. So her, yeah. So that's where Patty's skull is. And I don't feel sorry for her. 

1  

01:07:24

I mean, God has come on the balance. I mean, I understand, I love watching bones. I loved booth. I mean, I loved him. 

0  

01:07:35

I will say this too in my research that I did because I continued the research. Cause keep in mind, remember Patty had one daughter who was married to Joe Johnson and he said that 

1  

01:07:47

She was married two 

0  

01:07:48

Daughters. No, no, no, no. She, her mother had two daughters, at least two because pat Patty, 

1  

01:07:55

He was referred to, you said that she had two daughters after she got married, but then you only talked about the one daughter 

0  

01:08:03

And thought then there was the other one that, well, yeah, she, 

1  

01:08:07

I thought that maybe the T there were two, maybe it was a third. 

0  

01:08:11

Okay. Okay. Well, so she only had her daughter, the one daughter at this point and that one daughter never had any kids. So probably get they it's still, I guess the line ended, I don't know about her sister, Betsy, I don't know if her sister Betsy had any kids or anything, but I do know that Patty's daughter specifically did not have any children. So that is the terrible story of the Patty cannon gang. 

1  

01:08:41

I do not like Patty. I mean, you know, I do not like Patty, but I do want her to be buried. I do not like all the bones. I did not like it. I just played the bone. 

0  

01:08:52

Yeah. That, that I don't understand. I understand. Think about it because we do, we have been to museums where they do display bones of people. I mean, 

1  

01:09:01

I mean, I get, I get the stuff I do. Okay. They're studying the buttons. I get that. I do, you know, for research purposes, I get that, but just displaying bands, like the skull of a serial killer, 

0  

01:09:13

I get that as far as the Smithsonian goes, having them I'm okay with 

1  

01:09:18

That. I get that. I'm I'm okay with that because 

0  

01:09:22

I think another fear possibly, possibly is that if she is rebury, the chances of someone dying or up taking, or like someone doing something. So, I mean, I guess, 

1  

01:09:43

I guess that, 

0  

01:09:44

But I mean, yeah. So just interesting. And I did find it interesting that that phenologist studied both her sisters and hers and saw similarities. 

1  

01:09:54

And I do get that. I mean, you know, and it is educational and, and, and that is interesting. I will say, like I said, I did like watching that when it was on. And, and that is interesting to me, but let's not just, let's not display a skull in the court. Hey, you know, it's spooky season. Let's let's put the serial killers skull out on display. I mean, no, 

0  

01:10:17

No. 

1  

01:10:18

Hey, here's a box with all the bones in a wall. It's not cool. Not cool guys. 

0  

01:10:27

Yeah. So that's the story of Patty. I don't like, I don't like her at all, but we have a website you might like. Yes, it is where you can find any and all information on, oh, in UC you were looking for, it is one nation under crime.com. We are one nation under crime on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and at owing UC pot on Twitter. Recommend us follow us, subscribe to us, do whatever you can on all the things. I'm also go into apple podcasts, give us a five star review and a rating. We'll we're still give you stickers for it. We still have plenty. So we'll still send them out to you. As 

1  

01:11:06

We need more five star reviews, guys. 

0  

01:11:08

Five stars only be a good human being. Do something good today. It gives foster RB. Do something else. Good to right. Only good thing you can do. I mean, true. So we also have a patriotic. You will have another bonus episode coming out this week of USBs. And like I said before, all of those will be moving over to Patrion on January, 2022, which is next month. We appreciate you guys sticking in with us this week, especially on this one, man, I wanted to run away. So we will see you here. 

0  

01:11:50

Same time and thankfully different crime next week. And remember there isn't Liberty and justice for all. No matter what your kindergarten teacher told you, correct goodbye.