Dec. 27, 2021

1831: City Bank of New York Theft AKA The First Bank Heist in the United States

1831: City Bank of New York Theft AKA The First Bank Heist in the United States

This week's case has no murder! Leah was quite happy.

This week the ONUC gals discuss the first bank heist in the United States, the largest bank heists in the world, and Kayla raps (yes, we're serious).

Trigger Warning Level: None

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Sources: The Saturday Evening Post

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Transcript

You are listening to one nation under crime, a chronological historical true crime podcast. Each week we go through our nation's history and discuss one case from each year starting in 1800. I'm Kayla and I'm Leah. We've done it. What have we done? Christmas is over shoot. We've done it. It's a one week closer to Disney one week. So it's two days after Christmas. Now. Now the trough made it to this point. How was it? Was it a good time? We'll let you, it was we'll let you answer. Go ahead. That sounds either fantastic or terrible, depending on what you've said. 

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00:00:46

So now we're almost to 2020 to find when you say out loud, 20, 20, 20, 22 to, I mean, it's a good 20, 22 is an interesting year. It is a year that something is going to happen that will not occur for another thousand years. You have 7,000 years, February 22nd, 2022. It'll be 2, 2, 2, 2 0 2, 2. Cool. So the last time that'll happen for two to 2000 years, but you understand what I'm saying? 

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00:01:26

It's 2020. Yeah, yeah. 20, 22, 20 22, like, you know, the sequel. So <em></em> a reading. So we have another interesting case always for this week. It's, it's a shorter case as far as the case goes. Okay. But, and however, I have put some information in here that is also interesting, pertaining to our case. So, okay. 

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00:02:09

Only have really one source for this week other than Wikipedia. And that is the Saturday evening post. Oh, that's a good, good source to have. It's a good one. It's a good one. I agree. So let's get into the events. I'm ready of 1831, January 1st, William Lloyd Garrison began publishing the liberator, which was an anti-slavery newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts. Very nice. January 3rd, the first us building and loan association was organized in Frankford, Pennsylvania, January 15th, the first U S built locomotive made its first run, pulling a passenger train March 2nd. 

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00:02:53

John Frazy became the first us sculptor to receive a federal commission. Hmm. March 6th, Edgar Edgar Allen Poe was removed from west point military academy, dear for Y for Y. So our next one, April 18th, the university of Alabama was founded. I liked that school, April 21st. You have a tie to this school as well. New York university or NYU was founded in New York city. I like that school too. You know, someone there, I do July 4th America, or as most people may know it. 

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00:03:39

My country TIS of thee was saying for the first time in Boston, which is to the tune of God, save the queen. Yes, it is. My mother always reminds me of that. Of course she does. August 7th, the American Baptist minister William Miller preached his first sermon on the second advent of Christ in dressed in New York, which launched the advent movement in the United States, August 21st, Nat Turner's slave rebellion, AKA the south Hampton insurrection took place were enslaved Virginians rebelled, approximately 120 enslaved people and free black. 

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00:04:27

Nope, approximately 120 enslaved and free people were killed by militias and moms in the area. The Commonwealth of Virginia later executed an additional 56 enslaved people accused of being a part of the rebellion, including Nat Turner, himself, many black people who had not participated were also persecuted in the frenzy because Turner had been educated and literate as well as a popular preacher everyone's garbage state. Legislature was not Garfield. 

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00:05:07

State legislatures subsequently passed new laws, prohibiting education of enslaved and free black people restricting rights of assembly and other civil liberties for free people and requiring white ministers to be present at all worship services. Everyone's garbage. Everyone is not garbage. I mean, seriously, heaven forbid somebody, whatever, any anyway, it's frustrating. So we almost covered this as well. This was another case that there was a lot to it. 

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00:05:50

It actually ties back to a previous rebellion as well. Lot of problematic things at this time, this is true. 

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00:06:00

That 

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00:06:01

We're real, real hard. 

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00:06:05

Well, let me just say this at the beginning of any kind of movement to change how things are there is violence and it is bad. 

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00:06:15

I hate that. There always is. And I get that. However, just anyways, whatever it's bad, it's bad people just, and the reason that we didn't cover it this year for this year is because there is a first in this year, which we are going to cover today. Okay. So that was also part of it as well, because I do try to cover things that happened for the first time in the United States, as things go September 26th, Robert Montgomery birds play the gladiator premiered in New York city, December 1st, the Erie canal closed for an entire month due to the cold weather, December 5th, president John Quincy, Nope, December 5th, former us president John Quincy Adams took his seat as a member of the house of representatives. 

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00:07:10

December 10th, spirit of the times began publishing in New York city. And it was the premier sports journal of the 19th century. Well, this is a fun fact. And one week, well, two days too late, I really wanted this to be a part of last week's episode because last week was our Christmas technically episode. But December 25th of this year at Louisiana and Arkansas, we're the first states to observe Christmas as a holiday, 1836, Alabama became the first state in the United States to recognize Christmas as a state holiday. 

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00:07:58

Well, we were, we were progressed 

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00:08:00

Said, and then Louisiana and Arkansas also recognized it two years after Alabama did so very interesting. Our births in 1831, January 2nd, we have Justin Windsor. He is an American writer, librarian an historian. He was elected the first president of the American library association and the third president of the American historical association. Well, there you go. Here's a Capricorn, March 3rd, George Mortimer Pullman. It's interesting. Middle name tree. 

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00:08:38

He created a Pullman train car. Didn't he? Did he create a train car 

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00:08:44

With bed? The American engineer and industrialist designed and manufactured the Pullman sleeping car. Get me on. 

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00:08:52

You said 

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00:08:54

He is a Pisces, March 12th, Clement Studebaker. He is the American wagon and carriage manufacturer and he was a Pisces and yes. Studebaker 

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00:09:06

Of the Studebaker's of Studebaker. Yup, sure. July 8th, John him Burton was born Pemberton. First 

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00:09:19

Of all, he's a cancer. I find that ingenious as to what he does. Do you know who John Pemberton is? 

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00:09:30

I don't, but I have a feeling you're about to enlighten me the end. All of our wonderful, 

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00:09:35

The inventor of Coca-Cola. Oh, interesting. Huh? 

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00:09:42

I shouldn't have that. I went to the, we will call it Wolf. 

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00:09:45

That will be a USBs episode about the invention of Coca-Cola. John Pemberton was a bit of an addict and that is so that went down that path for a little bit, as I was researching on July 21st, Martha and Maxwell was born. She is the first female American naturalist and she helped found modern taxidermy. There you go. She was a cancer as well, October 29th off meal, Charles Marsh. 

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00:10:25

You heard that correct auth meal. That is 

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00:10:28

A name 

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00:10:30

American professor of paleontology in Yale college and president of the national academy of sciences. He is known for the bone wars against Edward drinker cope. These two men were extremely competitive and they discovered in documented more than 120 new species of dinosaurs. He was a Scorpio 

1  

00:10:53

That, that he is a hero to my nephews and to many other young children, not just boys because girls like dinosaurs, 

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00:11:03

True. Ellie likes dinosaurs. She had dinosaur pajamas for a long time. Dinosaur things are hard to find for girls. Anyways. They are November 19th, James, a Garfield, the 20th president of the United States was born. He was a Sagittarius. Very interesting. I 

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00:11:23

Think he's the president that had a pet alligator. If I'm 

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00:11:26

Not mistaken, there's one that had a pet raccoon too. 

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00:11:29

I am full of all kinds of facts and I'm just sharing them. 

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00:11:32

Sure. 

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00:11:34

I think he's the 

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00:11:34

One that did, he might be. I'm not sure. Our deaths in 1831, March 26, we have Richard Allen. He was the founder of the American Methodist Episcopal church in 1794, April 4th, Isaiah Thomas, an American publisher and author. He performed the first reading of the declaration of independence in Worchester, Massachusetts, and reported the first account of the battles of Lexington and Concord, July 4th, James Monroe, the fifth president of the United States died. And December eight, James Hoban architect of the white house died. 

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00:12:22

So March 19th, 1831, James Honeyman and William J. Murray stole the equivalent of just over $62 million from the city bank of New York. And it is now known as the first bank heist in the United States. Well, that's intriguing. So we're back in the big apple and we've talked about it a good bit since the first episode. So this week, the beginning of the episode will be a little different instead of going into the history of the location. 

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00:13:02

We're going to go into the history of the crime. Okay. By definition, a bank robbery is the crime of stealing money from a bank specifically while bank employees and customers are subject to force violence or simply a threat of violence. This is specifically for robbing a bank branch or a teller at the bank. This is not in reference to the robbery of a bank owned property, like a train armored car, or at this time stagecoach, you know, I used to be a bank teller. Yes, yes. That I was spell as fearful of that happening. And my dad worked at the bank. 

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00:13:43

He was in a bank robbery. Really? Yes. Well, you know, I mean, I, so what's funny is I did not work at a bank. Arguably I worked somewhere that could have been, people were more likely to try and steal from because we did not have as much security. And that is a pharmacy. Yes. I was a pharmacy technician for quite a while. And one thing that our pharmacist ways told us about because there are for those who aren't aware, which you might be aware, but there are different classes of medications. So a class two medication is something that is, it can be highly addictive. 

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00:14:26

It's very strong. That's where your oxycodone is. Our Adderall, fentanyl. Those kinds of things are, are labeled as a class, two medication. You know, you also have your class threes and fours, which are going to fall under the lines of like hydrocodone, what you S like Laura tab, that kind of thing. And then it's not allowed to have, and then, you know, Xanax, Klonopin, those kinds of things all fall within that class, a three to four system as well. But a class two medication is very strict in dispensing. You have to be very careful when you do that. They are in a locked cabinet that is to remain locked, unless you are physically in it getting something out. 

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00:15:08

Right. And you know, at a pharmacy, if you even pay attention for a little bit, you can kind of see where medications are because the pharmacy is always like wide open, like there's glass everywhere. And you know, you can see to the back and depending on the pharmacy that you work at, some things might be in alphabetical order. Some things might be in order of what they're for, where I was at. It was where they kind of what they were for. So I'm like all the birth control was together. All those things, you know, like different things that injectables were together, kids, antibiotics we're all together. 

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00:15:49

So those kinds of things, and one thing that she, our pharmacist always told us, she said, if we're ever robbed, there was a button under the counter for us to push. But she said, if we're ever robbed, push the button, open the cash register, get the keys and open the C2 cabinet. And she said, I don't care if you hand them a grocery bag to put all the drugs in, show them what they're looking for and, and just stand to the side. Yeah. She's like, it's not worth it. Yeah. She said, it's not worth it. 

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00:16:20

And that's what they, in our training, that's what they said, do, do what they tell 

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00:16:23

Them. 

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00:16:25

And, and I said, you know, if they tell you to lay on the floor, you know, try to remember as much as you can safely. You know, if, if all you see is their shoes, 

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00:16:38

Try to remember their shape. Exactly. You know, that was how Richard Ramirez, the night stalker was called. It was because of his 

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00:16:44

Shoes. Yeah. I mean, that's what they told us, 

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00:16:46

Just so you know, in any time like that, and we were not robbed while I worked there after I left someone, broke in through the drive-through window at night when, when it was closed. Yeah. It, it was pretty bad. But the other, I worked at kind of like a small family owned pharmacy and we had two locations and the other location, there's a truck that comes by and that truck is what delivers the medication. And it's all in these massive totes that are all zip tied, shut. Like you can't open them. You know, you have to sign for all of it. The pharmacist has to sign that truck was pulled up to the other location of the pharmacy that I worked at. 

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00:17:32

And while he was sitting there getting out to get the medications out, to take them into the pharmacy, he was robbed directly behind the pharmacy. So yeah. Any, any instance like that when there's a chance to be dropped, just give them what they want. Yeah. And especially, and that was the thing too, is, you know, in while, you know, like a bank robbery is very dangerous because the people are there for money. And you know, now there's all these certain rules with money. As you know, you can only have certain access. The safes only have allowed to be open during certain times. Like those kinds of things. One thing that the pharmacist told us all the time, as she said, the people who are here to steal what we have are likely not going to be okay, mentally. 

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00:18:21

She said, they will likely be people who might have, you know, could have an addiction issue. And she said, please understand the desperation yes. Of, of someone in that state of mind. And that is why it is not like, it's not, you know? Yeah. Don't, don't reason don't, you know, nothing, just do what they ask and go like. Yeah. And yeah, it was, it is kind of scary though, working in one of those places where you can just kind of, because we did have people that came in that, I mean, they were kind of like, I was, they gave you bobs. Yeah. And I was like, like, I don't, I don't like it. 

1  

00:18:58

Like, I wasn't constantly worried when I was there, but I mean, dad did, he was at the time he was a, a manager and a guy came in with a flower box and it was not flowers on the box. It could have been a sawed-off shotgun and he could have held it on my dad. Then that could 

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00:19:19

Be scary. And yeah, it's very, he survived. 

1  

00:19:22

It's very scary. 

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00:19:23

Everybody's okay. Yes. And yeah, the pharmacy that I worked at, like, they, they did get robbed when I did not work there anymore, but everybody was fine and there were cameras everywhere. Like it was not somewhere that like, you should have done that. Like there were cameras everywhere and an alarm system and like it's it's 

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00:19:46

Yeah. Well, these guys 

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00:19:47

Got caught too. Yeah. It's insane. So a heist, which is a little bit different. So robbing a bank, we talked about it's, you know, it's not it's if it's a robbery, it's usually a physical location. It's not going to be like when somebody steals an armored car or things like that. And then a heist there isn't really so much a definition for a heist, but it's typically viewed as a more elaborate scheme. 

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00:20:18

Like ocean's 11 

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00:20:19

You'll know how I love my comparisons. So think of it as the difference between Catwoman and the joker. Catwoman is typically sneaking into the bank under the cover of night, like slinking around the corners and shadows. And she's like in and out before anybody knows, then there's the joker who just plows through the front of the bank and an armored truck in broad daylight with machine guns and a crew outfitted with Ronald Reagan masks and ready to take out a SWAT team if necessary steal everything. So these really aren't definitions per se of the two terms, but they are a general understanding. 

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00:21:01

So like a heist is generally just going to be something that's very crafted. It's not going to typically, like I said, with Catwoman she's at night, nobody's going to really be there for their child intent of harm or violence. It's just kind of get in, get out. Right. Whereas you know, other ones and you can just go through the front door and hold somebody up like full that's a whole different that's when you get into robbery. So we're going to get into the law. You've probably figured out by now that this is one of my favorite things to do. Probably why people say I should be a lawyer according to the federal bureau of investigations, the FBI, for those who don't know the uniform code reporting program robbery is quote the taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care custody or control of a person or persons by force of threat or by putting the victim in fear, not even in violence, just putting a victim in fear, however, Burghley however, burglary is quote, unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or theft. 

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00:22:21

So I guess you could say like a heist would fall under the burglary category if no one is there to harm. So under federal law bank robbery in the U S is defined in its entirety and made illegal due to the statuses set forth under title 18 of the United States code case. Anybody's wondering this is the main criminal code of the federal government of the United States and title 18 specifically deals with federal crimes and criminal procedure. It is under subsection 21, 13 bank robbery and incidental crimes. 

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00:23:01

This section specifically breaks down the exact sentences, fines or punishment for different levels of violating the code. So you can like you could Rob the bank, but not have a weapon. And that's completely different charge than if you robbed the bank with a weapon or if there's people there or not there. So it's a lot of different ones. Most of them entail fines, but they go all the way up to a maximum sentence of 25 years, life, imprisonment or death. So, you know, there's a bit of a scale there, correct? I'm not going to go into it much further on law side because I know it can be overwhelming and boring, so I'm not going to continue. 

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00:23:42

But if that is something you all would like for me to go more into, I'll be more happy to do so in the future, as I've said before, I'm interested in law terminology. But back when I kind of, the reason that I do this is back when I started listening to true crime podcasts, there were a lot of terms thrown around that I didn't really understand. And I would kind of use context clues to the best of my knowledge, to like understand what it was and move forward. So now that we've done that we are going to go through some bank robberies, burglaries, and heists that are the most infamous in our history of the world, who, before we get into our case today, Bonnie and Clyde bacon appearance. 

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00:24:27

Nope, really, really. So we're going to take a trip down under and go back to September 14th, 1828, five men dug through a sewage drain. And I just put you get pregnant as in George street, Sydney and stole the equivalent of $13 million in promissory notes and coins from the vault of the bank of Australia. It is coined, get it going as the first bank robbery in Australia and is still the largest in Australian history. 

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00:25:09

We'll head back state side to Malden, Massachusetts. On December 15th, 1863, a man walked into a bank shot the bookkeeper who was only 17 and stole the equivalent of $110,000. The bank offered the equivalent of 132,000 as a reward for the arrest. This is the first armed bank robbery in the United States history over in the Russian empire on June 26, just a few years away from a really important day in 1907. My birth of course, a bank highs took place known as the 1907 TIF plus bank heist or the great Bolshevik bank heist. 

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00:25:56

It resulted in 44, 0 deaths, OMA, 50 injuries. And the theft of just over the us equivalent of $4 million. See Vladimir Lenin, who was actually the founder of the Bolsheviks and Joseph Stalin were the two main organizers of the heist. The plan was to intercept a treasury shipment and Joseph Stalin is known as a Russia's greatest bank robber. However, the largest bank heist to ever occur. 

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00:26:38

What year do you think it would have happened to ever occur? 1915, 2003? Oh, well this was an interesting one. The central bank of Iraq robbery was said to be orchestrated by Saddam Hussein and was carried out by his son queasy. The total amount stolen is the equivalent of $1 billion. Wow. And it was all in cash Alma on the list of the top 10 biggest bank robberies in us history, the us barely made the list at number 10, the robbery of the United California bank took place in 1972, during which $30 million were stolen from the bank's fault, led by a meal den CEO. 

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00:27:37

It is said that the heist was well-practiced and executed and that they might have gotten away with it. If they didn't make one very large mistake. Oh dear. They had a kind of test run in Ohio just a few months earlier and they use the same methods in the California robbery. It wasn't hard for the FBI to connect the dots. The FBI learned of the townhouse used as headquarters, which had been rented out by one of the gang members. A search initially found nothing until the dishwasher was checked. 

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00:28:17

Oh no, the dishwasher, the burglars had forgotten to run the dishwasher before returning to Ohio and the recovered fingerprints, permitted federal arrest warrants to be issued dirty dishes. This led to the arrest and conviction of all the burglars along with recovering, most of the stolen money as well. When most people think of robbing banks, what is the first image that comes to mind when you think of a bank robbery, what is your first image that comes to mind? Cause I know, I know with a general consensuses Balaklava and a gun, no dust mud. 

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00:29:01

This first image. I think of tombstone. I think the west, most people will think of like an old west bank robbery. They like run in, grab the bag with the seemingly very large money sign on the side of it. Okay. And like trail away, you know? Okay. Because that's what comes to mind mess, man. And again, I put for many it's the wild, wild west. I might've had a couple of drinks while I was writing this. So after a wild, wild west, I put wild, wild west Jim west Desperado in my head. 

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00:29:46

I know Buffalo soldier look, it's like that told ya. Dan's the last seen distress. Get out of that dress. What you need Jim west. Anyways, I might've liked that movie a little bit. And who doesn't love will Smith. Anyways, that was a fun movie. I have to say. It was a very weird, funny movie because it was very odd. It was quirky. And it was funny. Look will, Smith is just funny. Will Smith is so funny. I love him. Love, love wild bliss. So however, the foundation for economic education research this and figured out that the mental image of a Western bank robbery was mostly a myth because between 1859 and 1,941 years, for those of you doing the dishes or painting, like we know Amy is right now. 

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00:30:42

Hi Amy. Hi. If y'all don't know her anyways, she follows us on Instagram. She has amazing art, YouTube. She lives, she lives near us. So hi Amy, there were less than 10 bank robberies and 41, but all the Western exactly ways portray just like somebody, you know? Yeah. Shooting up the bank can take in there a little canvas bag with the money on it and sneaking out. Or you think of the Hamburglar. Honestly, I think of the fan burglar. I mean, if I'm stealing anything, it's going to be hamburgers, honestly. 

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00:31:27

I mean, give me a cheeseburger and some McDonald's fries and Hey, we might be able to talk about something, but Chick-fil-A fries. Oh, that's true. Unless it's Sunday or Mallows fries. Oh, malice rosters again. Sorry, tangent. Sorry. The study was completed before most states and the library of Congress started publishing their historical backlog of newspapers. Online bank robberies. Might've been uncommon, but the number is for sure more than 10 because they just didn't have all the records there yet. This next part is a case that we are going to get into later some time, I think in the middle of 20, 22, maybe I don't remember. 

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00:32:14

On February 13th, 1866, the James' younger gang robbed the clay county savings association in Liberty, Missouri. This was the first successful daylight bank robbery during peace time in the United States, there were daylight robberies before this that were successful, but they were the cause of the civil war. So why this was the first one during peace time. Gotcha. On December 21st, 1911, two armed men of the bonnet game, intercepted a bank messenger outside of, okay. 

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00:32:56

I looked this up. I did it a few times in my head. Here's this is the time. This is your moment. They intercepted a bank messenger outside of the <em></em> in Paris. Sounds great. Right? Once they had the money, they hope, hope does not hump. Once they had the money, they hopped into a stolen vehicle. And this has been described as the first successful use of a getaway car during a bank robbery. Very cool. During the 1920s and 1930s bank robberies took on a steep incline in the U S and this led to the formation of the federal bureau of investigation. 

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00:33:44

This era of bank robbers included the likes of John Dillinger. Pretty boy, Floyd machine, gun Kelly, Bonnie and Clyde and baby face Nelson. See Bonnie and Clyde did make an appearance eventually. Not yet just not their story. We will get all to all of them. At some point, trust me, we will, because I mean the John Dillinger gang will of course get to that machine gun Kelly. Yes, guys, his name is not machine gun Kelly. He may be a rapper. He may have chosen the name machine gun Kelly. That is not his name, machine gun. Kelly was actually bank robber and a pretty bad dude. 

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00:34:25

So now, you know, just FYI, if you don't know now, you know, I mean, you got to, my favorite, however, is possibly Willie Sutton. And only for the fact of his answer on why he robbed banks. Oh dear. Because that's where the money is. If you kept them in churches, he ran touches where the money is wrapping up this section. We need to talk about something that a lot of people use as a cute colloquialism, but might not know where it originated from Stockholm syndrome. 

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00:35:07

In 19 73, 4 hostages were taken during the Nora mound storge robbery in Stockholm, Sweden, and they were held for 131 hours. Once the hostages were released from their captors, they would not testify against them in court. During the siege on the bank, one of the captors told the police to not hurt the robbers because they hadn't done anything to them. The captors even went as far as to willingly stand in front of the robbers. When they exited the building to avoid them being shot by the police. It came out later that the victims told reporters that they were not afraid of the robbers, but they were afraid of the police. 

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00:35:52

The hostages were studied by psychologists and the term Nora mound storge syndrome later changed to Stockholm syndrome was used to define hostages, developing a psychological bond with their captors during captivity. This was the first criminal event in Sweden to be covered by live television. Hm that's why it Stockholm syndrome because of a Stockholm, Sweden UMaine makes sense. Beauty and the beast. Anyways, that's the first thing I thought of. Yeah. The first bank heist in the United States went a bit differently than in Stockholm, James Honeyman and William J. Murray set their sights on the city bank of New York to change their future forever. 

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00:36:44

It did change their future, but not in the way that the men had hoped. I was going to say probably changed the we're talking about on the way they wanted. You might not know the name Citibank of New York immediately, but you might know it by its current name Citibank. I was going to say, I know Citibank, the bank was founded on June 16th, 18, 12. And the first president was the statesman Samuel Osgood. The bank was responsible for financing war bonds for the war of 1812. They served as a founding member of the financial clearing house in New York. They underwrote the union during the American civil war was $50 million in war bonds. 

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00:37:26

They opened the first foreign exchange department of any bank and they received a $5 million deposit that was given to Spain for the U S acquisition of the Philippines. The bank officially joined the national banking system under the national bank act in 1865. And the name changed to the national city bank of New York. Not long after it was one of the largest banks in the United States. And then in 1893 at the largest bank in New York alone, the bank helped finance the Panama canal. And at one point it held 11% of the federal government's money. 

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00:38:10

Ooh, just a little bit of money. There's a lot more we can get into regarding it. But I will say that eventually the president of the bank was a Rockefeller for our international listeners. This is a big deal chase. The Rockefellers were well are and American industrial political and banking family that owns one of the world's largest fortunes. And yes, it is the same Rockefellers as in the Rockefeller center, Christmas tree lighting every year in New York, those Rockefellers will probably eventually cover them the USBs. 

0  

00:38:56

Yeah, because there's a lot with the Rockefellers, maybe such as, I don't know them pushing for natural holistic medications to not be FDA approved and for drug companies pharmaceuticals to be FDA approved. Hmm. Maybe who knows I do, but anyways, so we might get to that. It's a very, it's, it's interesting, but they, yes, one of the Rockefellers was one of the main pioneers and one making weed illegal and then two pushing pharmaceuticals. 

0  

00:39:39

So interesting and taking all holistic medicine and basically made the public opinion of holistic medicine to be junk science. Hmm. So it's, it's all interesting. It was late at night on March 20th, 1831 when two men James Honeyman and William J. Murray set off to Rob the city bank of New York armed with only a set of homemade keys. 

1  

00:40:09

I mean, interesting weapon, weapon of choice. Interesting. 

0  

00:40:13

These were duplicates made from a walk's impression of the locks on the bank. And while they were likely not an exact match, they were close enough to get them into the building. And they also were able to lock the door behind them. Once they got in, once in the building, the men went to empty the vault and clean out the safety deposit boxes by morning, they had taken $245,000 in coins, bank notes and valuables in bags. I'm assuming canvas bags with the money sign on the side and then like creeping around the corner. 

1  

00:40:48

I, now I will say, coins are delivered in this canvas bags points are delivered in them, but they don't just have money signs on them. They have other stuff 

0  

00:40:56

On what I imagined, but, but they are 

1  

00:40:58

Delivered in canvas bags. 

0  

00:41:01

So there you go. The amount today would be around $62 million. The men left the bank early in the morning and waited until the city nightwatchman had already gone off duty. Manhattan was shell shocked and couldn't believe it could be taken so easily. A $5,000 reward at that time, which is $146,000 was offered for the apprehension of the criminals who committed the crime Honeyman and Murray took the stolen goods to Murray's house. They divided everything amongst themselves. Honeymoon took his share, put it in three trunks, probably much like captain White's trunks and left the home. 

0  

00:41:46

He took the trunks and went to a boarding house where he checked in under the name Jones, the landlord noted about his new tenant, that there was something peculiar in his conduct, particularly regarding the trunks and that it excited the suspicions of the landlord Honeyman divided the stolen money again and gave her on $37,000 to his brother-in-law across town. The news of the robbery had made it to new York's chief, Constable Jacob Hayes. He immediately thought of honeymoon because Honeyman had recently dodged a robbery charge that involved a store in Brooklyn, but he was able to get away with it because there wasn't any evidence that Honeyman did it. 

0  

00:42:38

There were even more robbery charges that honeymoon had also avoided in the past, such as when he was caught, trying to steal money from a Steamboat and another time from an English male coach. Well, how was he able to evade for them or avoid them? Who knows? I just said that he didn't get charged for them. Constable Hayes immediately went to the last known residence of honeymoon, but to his shock honeymoon was gone. And so was the money just four days after the crime honeymoon left the boarding house with one of the trunks and told the landlord that he would be back soon for the others. I'm going to go ahead and say that this landlord was probably an ancestor of mine because as soon as Honeyman was away from the trunks, the landlord immediately went to go see what was in them since he seemed so peculiar about this. 

0  

00:43:28

And then he just go see what's going on. The landlord called Constable Hayes and told him to come to the boarding house immediately. The man opened the remaining trunks and found a hundred and eighty five thousand seven hundred and eighty five thousand seven hundred and fifty eight dollars remaining. I had to do quite a bit of math to figure that out. And it's about $47 million today. Just, just a little bit. I mean, you got to think though that the landlord probably like scooped a few, like, I mean, as like a rule board for five days, hoping for, I don't, I don't know. I don't trust him. 

0  

00:44:08

Thank the best of people, Kayla. Thank the best of people. I I'm just saying anyways, just saying nah. Yeah. They only make a good team. He it wait. So what do you do when this happens? Well, of course you just wait for him to come back and they did. It took only three hours and honeymoon walked right through the front door. He was arrested and taken before a judge. Once honeymoon was in custody, the landlord recalled that he had another man visiting him after describing the man in detail, it was surmised that it was his literal partner in crime, Marie. 

0  

00:44:53

Nice. In all honesty, these two men had a pretty harrowing story on how they got to the U S because their true story begins at a penal colony at botany bay in Australia. Oh, for those who are not aware of what a penal colony is, it is a settlement established overseas for punishing criminals by forced labor and isolation from society. The penal colonies in Australia were formed as an alternative to relieve crowding in British prisons. I believe it's botany. That's what I'm going with. I think you're right. Botany bay. 

0  

00:45:36

That's where both men and our story were held. And it was one of the first and on August 16th of 18. Nope. August 16th, 1786, the decision was made for a colonization party of convicts, military and civilian personnel under the command of captain Arthur Phillips. There were 775 convicts onboard, six transport ships. Then there were another 645 travelers that included crew Marines and the families of those workers, including children. There were 11 ships in total, when you include the convicts and the other ships, they were called the first fleet and they set sail on May 13th, 1787, and finally arrived in January. 

0  

00:46:26

That is a long trip. That's a long trip. Once they took a look at the surroundings, it became clear that it was not going to be able to sustain everyone. The bay was too open to contain prisoners and the soil was to dam the colony. It was moved to what is Sydney Australia today. And they established the first permanent European colony. It was named new south Wales on January 26. Fun fact, January 26 is now celebrated as Australia day. The death rate was extremely high because they thought far enough ahead only to have just enough food for a few weeks after landing. 

0  

00:47:10

What they didn't think of was to bring people who were actually skilled farmers or people who knew how to work with livestock, that, you know, just those things. A second fleet was sent to quote help, and they made it worse just because they repeated the cycle. Well, that's helpful. The treatment of the convicts was so intense that the ax had to be past that acts had to be passed to regulate the punishment of convicts. For example, one part of the act was that you couldn't sentence anyone to over 50 lashes for punishment. There was no limit before this. 

0  

00:47:51

Oh, 

1  

00:47:52

If you take out your frustration and things were not going well, so mean you were already when things aren't going well, you're already more apt to be more frustrated. You're already awesome. Great. 

0  

00:48:07

If a convict was well behaved, then the convict could be given a ticket of leave, which granted partial freedom. It was essentially parole like that. They got parole. Most of the sentences were seven years. And once done, they were issued a certificate of freedom. The certificate made the reformed convicts, able to go back to England or become an actual settler in the colony. It's not clear how the two men in our story got out of Australia, but once they eventually it says they escaped. So I'm assuming it was not under actual good means. Yeah, it wasn't, it wasn't kosher. Right? 

0  

00:48:46

But they eventually escaped and returned to England. Once they arrived in England, they committed several robberies and then floods the United States and hopes of continuing their criminal enterprise 

1  

00:48:59

One. So that did not reform them. 

0  

00:49:02

No, not at all. Once honeymoon was put in jail, Constable Hayes set out to go find Marie, but Marie had fled to Philadelphia that didn't stop Constable Hayes. And he hunted Marie down and just brought him back to New York for trial. Both men were convicted and sentenced to five years at sing, sing prison. Oh, we talked about that place for a moment. Not a place you want to go. Nope. About $176,000 of the stolen money was recovered by the Constable. And they kept searching for the additional 69,000. It seems like the money would never be found until months later Honeyman's, brother-in-law enter in a bank to exchange some of the bank notes. 

0  

00:49:49

He was given by honeymoon. The bank clerk recognized the bank notes as belonging to the city bank. And Constable Hayes quickly arrived in an exchange for immunity Honeyman's brother-in-law gave back all of the money that he was given immediately. Keep in mind, this was only $37,000. 

1  

00:50:12

Okay. So this is his brother-in-law. So I guess maybe the brother-in-law was, he may be in on his escape to get to America. 

0  

00:50:21

I don't know. It didn't say there was nothing really on 

1  

00:50:24

It. Just, you 

0  

00:50:25

Know, not sure. I'm sure that's probably why he went there because of that, but I don't know if he helped him in any way thoughts in my brain. So like I said, this was only $37,000. So where was the remaining 42,000 good question? No one knows. And it's never been found interesting. And that's the story of the first bank heist in the United States. Interesting. So we still don't know still don't know, but Hey, we had a story with no murder this week. 

0  

00:51:08

So, I mean, come on bloodshed. Well, unless you're in an Australia, penal colony, but none, none of our principal players. Correct. So that is it for how do I, in the year, our last episode of 12 one, we have been doing this podcast for six months now. How exciting, just thought of that because we started at the end of may. Yeah. So we've been at this for six months, so thank you guys for sticking with us for our first six months of working out the kinks and figuring out this whole podcasting world and for keeping us scaling, like for, you know, showing us that, Hey, you want to listen to it? 

0  

00:51:52

I mean, you download our podcasts. So we are officially as of a couple of days ago, we have listeners in 30 countries. Wow. I know it was really cool. So we've, we, we see you guys, we see all out there, we appreciate it and keep telling people about us. And we got a good backlog of episodes for people to listen to you now. So if you know of anybody who would like to binge a podcast, tell them about us. Yes. You can also tell them about our website, where you can find any and all OEC information. You're looking for. It's one nation under crime.com. We are one nation under crime on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and at Owen, UC pod on Twitter. 

0  

00:52:36

We know you love our podcast. You've listened to, she was for six months now. So why haven't you gone and given us a five star review. And if you have, why haven't you like left a comment? Yeah. Leave us a comment. We, we need to see those. And then that's how you get free stickers. So please do that. We do have a Patrion, if you would like to help with the cost of making and hosting the show. And now the privilege of listening to USBs. Yep. Just an FYI. It's not going to be an episode a week over on USBs. We're doing that just for the holidays. It's going to be more like two a month. And I want to spoil you and like get you to take in. That's going to be the normal. I mean, and unless we get a substantial amount of Patrion donors, which we are going to, Kayla's got to work a nine to five. 

0  

00:53:23

So I can not write this many episodes. It's a lot. And see, I don't get to ride any because it has to be a surprise to me. I can't help her do that. So it's cause I would tell everyone about our podcast so that I eventually don't have to work nine to five. That'd be great. Or this will be her nine to five. That's true. That would be great. So thank you guys for listening to the last O N U C episode of 2021. Yes. We will see you here. Same time, different crime next year, next year. 

0  

00:54:07

And remember there isn't always Liberty and justice for all. Bye guys. Happy new year.