March 14, 2022

1841: The Colt-Adams Murder Trial - Part One

1841: The Colt-Adams Murder Trial - Part One

Who is John C. Colt? Why did he murder Samuel Adams? Is it THAT Samuel Adams? No. Is it THAT Colt family? Yes.

This week the ONUC gals discuss the Cole-Adams Murder Trial. They will dive deep into the history of the Colt Paterson revolver, John C. Colt's background and many, many professions, and the events that led to Samuel Adams' murder.

**YOU CAN GET EPISODE TWO RIGHT NOW ON OUR PATREON FEED**

Trigger Warning Level: Low

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Sources: Encyclopedia, Murder by Gaslight, and The New England Historical Society

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Transcript

You are listening to one nation under crime, a historical chronological, true crime podcast. Each week we go through our nation's history and discuss one case from each year starting in 1800. I'm Kayla and I'm Leah. We are to episode 44 Vodafone. So this episode this week, I'm pretty sure we were talking about it before. I'm pretty sure this is going to be a two-parter. There's a lot of notes to it, and we will talk about briefly the actual crime, but there is a lot of background information that is very interesting leading up to it. 

00:00:51

Okay. I'm intrigued. So, and if people see the name, Leah does not know what we were covering down. So if you are looking at the name and you're saying that kind of looks familiar yes. What you were thinking. Yes. So Nope. We will get to that portion. And so we're going to go through our sources for this week. Like I said, this is going to kind of be a little bit different because we are also in a place that we've been before. So we are going to get to it first clues, man, I know our sources for this week. 

00:01:36

We have encyclopedia.com murder by Gaslight, always a favorite. And by the way, the murder by Gaslight article, the title is corpse in shipping crates. Oh, ma and then the other source is the new England historical society. So, which honestly, I love, I love new England. Like that whole area. Like I love new England. We were me and my boyfriend were talking about it the other day. Cause we were talking about different places and how it was kind of hard to like process that some things have been around for as long as they have been when like here and nothing had talked about it before from in that's why we drink. 

00:02:25

They always say that they have a hard time comprehending anything before the revolution like that. Anything ever existed that just because, just because of how it is. But as we were talking about that, but I think probably because that's like the main area that people have preserved. So it has all of like the historical things in that area. So anyways, the new England historical society was a really good I've used them before and I'm sure I'll use them again. So When so much happened yeah, because that's kind of where it all started for our country. 

00:03:05

And since we are probably doing this into episodes, what we're going to do is I will go through the events that happened in 1841. And then next episode, we will still have some things at the beginning. We'll so you'll still have like some little beginning parts in the next episode as well to try and keep it somewhat the same, but there's, there's a lot going on in this case a lot going on. So Interesting. Our events in 1841, March 4th, we have William Henry Harrison. He gave the longest us presidential inauguration speech at 8,443 words. 

00:03:48

Just a couple, just a few more, more than just a simple thing. Just a few, which you know, we'll get to it in a second, but he has another claim to fame as well. But I mean, he Was excited. He was very, he was very Excited, Very excited, but he has another claim to fame. So Other than being president, Other than the longest us presidential inauguration speech, March 5th, the first continuous filibuster in the U S began. And it lasted until March 11th. So for those who don't know what a filibuster is And it wasn't Mr. Smith. 

00:04:28

Nope. So a filibuster is a political procedure where one or more members of a legislative body prolong debate on a proposed legislation to like defer or prevent a decision from going on. So it's basically like holding off to try and prevent something from passing or something like that. And it usually does not take, you know, sometimes they don't last as, as long so, but this was the first one that lasted six days because I'm pretty sure at the same time, like con like they can't leave either. 

00:05:14

I think like the court ha I think it has to remain going like it can't stop. So I don't know. The movie Mr. Smith goes to Washington has Jimmy Stewart in it. And it's a movie that I watched in school. We did not watched a movie the, the night that we did watch in school though, dead poet's society. Go watch it again. It's on Amazon prime that came Out while I was in school. Love that movie. Anyway, this movie, Very good movie. Ethan Hawk is in that movie. And he made a comment saying that this was one of like the first big movies that he made. 

00:05:56

And Robin Williams could tell that he was really, really like nervous. And so he said that he helped him through making the movie and said that had it not been for him. He didn't know if he would have continued. Cause he was so nervous, like filming for that movie. So Robin Williams, it's one of the best movies, honestly ever. I should not have been shown it in middle school, which was the first time that I saw it. Trigger warning for things in that movie. That movie gets real dark real quick, but the message in that movie, oh, captain my captain, you gotta love it. 

00:06:36

Mr. Keating, absolutely adore it. So March 22nd of the same year, Orlando Jones patented a method for alkali starch extraction, which was later applied to corn, making cornstarch That'll thicken up your suit. It Will so will xantham gum. I only know that. Cause my boyfriend, March 27th, the first steam fire engine in the U S was tested in New York city, which was made by Paul <em></em> Hodge. Well, there we go. 

00:07:15

April 4th, president William, Henry Harrison. I told you he made history again in the same year you did. He died of pneumonia while yep. After, yeah, he died of pneumonia after his speech, like he had it for quite a, quite a bit, making him the first president to die in office and making him the president with the shortest term served ever at one month. And then this is the first time that a vice president had to take over, like in that short period of time. So John Tyler became the 10th president of the United States. Perhaps he should have given a shorter speech Possibly. Yes. 

00:07:56

It said that he had a cold, like before the Speech And that he like it had started to rain and he continued to give his speech and they said, that's why he probably got sick, but we did not have a vice-president at this time either. Cause this was kind of around the time where they didn't really know what to do. So Protocol. Yeah. So it'll say when you look at John Tyler's presidency, it'll say like vice-president empty, like antibodies. So Nice little dash There. You know, April 10th, the New York Tribune began publishing under the editor Horace Greenley, which a lot of people may know April 14th. 

00:08:40

We talked about this. The first detective story was published by Edgar Allen Poe, entitled murders and Rue morgue, which was published in Graham's magazine in Philadelphia, which actually Poe the editor of at the time. And we discussed this in episode 40. So if you want to go back to episode 40, it was about the beautiful cigar girl. Yes. And we'll get to her in a second May 1st, the first wagon bound for California independence, Missouri, June 24th, St. John's college opened in the Bronx and it's now Fordham university, July 5th, Thomas Cook opened the first travel agency. 

00:09:28

Never knew that that was something that I will be go interesting. But here we are. There You go. July 28th, one Mary Cecilia Rogers, AKA the beautiful cigar girl was found dead in the Hudson river that occurred in this year. And we still don't know. Wow. I don't know. August 16th, president John Tyler vetoed a bill mint to re-establish the second bank of the United States, which enraged the wig party and the members rioted outside of the white house in the most violent demonstration on the white house grounds in us history. 

00:10:13

Interesting. And then we just jumped to this one, August 21st, John Hampton patented Venetian blinds. We just jumped from most violent white house being to Venetian blinds. I mean, you know, nice little segue, September 9th, Tom higher beat George Mick Chester in 101 rounds of fighting. Oh at Caldwell's landing in New York. And he became the first American heavyweight boxing champion. One sport that I just can not get into. I don't know Boxing or what is it? 

00:10:54

The other one? The big one that everybody. Yeah, the MMA MMFI Can't yo, that is just too much for me. I'm sorry. MMA is a lot. I will say that So much. It's just too much. I mean It is lover, not a fighter. That's all I can say. I just, I don't understand. Just dating another person to a pulp for, for no other reason than just for sport. MMA is, is more of that. And then boxing is where it's more, It's more Boxing. It's more. Yeah. Which I mean, there are a lot of different things in MMA where there's a lot of rules and regulations. 

00:11:38

That's true, but just, just hitting somebody else. I don't, I don't understand it. And it is a sport and that is fine. If you lot boxing, you can like boxing. I don't understand it. It's it's an interesting one. It's not interesting. September 30th, Samuel Solcom patented the stapler. I liked that invention November 4th, the first wagon train arrived in California. After six months of travel, That was hard stuff. Six months, November 13th, the James braid first saw a demonstration of animal magnetism and it led him to study the subject, which was eventually called hypnosis Animal magnetism is ma it's a mesmerizing mysterious force that influences human beings. 

00:12:40

Well Maintenance. What Michael felt when he saw me the first, You know, Obviously That is animal magnetism. Yes. But it eventually became known as hypnosis. I hit the, tasked him with my womanly Wiles. She's speechless gas. Which if we, I remember back in our episode, that would make you A Prostitute by some standards. I mean just saying That's all I got to say Every time. I think about stuff like that. When someone says, you know, any kind of thing like that, I'm like, Hmm. 

00:13:20

Interesting. So you know what that makes you, It's always, It's always a fun fact. I really appreciate you. You guys can't see the sign language. I mean, I'm here and here to make known what, what the world needs today, November 16th, Napoleon Garrin, patented life preservers that were made of cork Clever And December 31st, The very last day of the year, Alabama Under that place Became the first state to license dental surgeons, Which I put in parentheses funny, considering the trope about Alabama's that we don't have teeth. 

00:14:12

I mean, We were the first, we were the first though to have Christmas Lights to declare it Declared a holiday. I remember that. But yes, Alabama became the first state to licensed dental surgeons. So, you know, look at us, look at us, go. And then any of the other events, like I said, we're going to do those at the beginning of next week. So we will be able to, and there's some interesting little tidbits for that as well. So we'll get into them. So to move on to our case for this week, September 17th, 1841, New York printer, Samuel Adams, not that one, The Beer people. 

00:14:56

Yeah, no. He seemed well. Adams walked into the office of John C Colt to collect a debt owed for printing textbooks. This was the last time Samuel Adams was seen alive. And if you were thinking, Colt sounds familiar, it Should, oh, the gun People. And that is what we're going to discuss in the beginning of this Cancer, We are back in NYC again and much like some of our other cases in the city, we are starting out the history a little differently because we have to talk about some family tree history. 

00:15:39

The last name Colt in the United States is well-known for its ties to Samuel Colt who invented the Colt Patterson revolving cylinder handgun while there were others. This was the first practical revolver and the first practical repeating firearm. However, regardless of your feelings on, on gun control or gun ownership, you know, we get all sides of it. This was arguably not his greatest contribution because his greatest contribution was the use of interchangeable parts in the manufacturing of the revolver. 

00:16:25

Colt knew that some parts were made by machines. So he moved to have all of them made by machines to ensure that all of the dimensions of the parts were exactly the same, so that nothing would be made by hand anymore. It will be made to specific dimensions and is Quite helpful. I will attest to that. Yes. He wanted to turn the process into what is now known as an assembly line in a letter, seeing Yule wrote to his father in 1836 and said, quote, the first work men would receive two or three of the most important parts and what to fix these and pass them onto the next, who would add apart and pass the growing article onto another, who would do the same and so on until the complete arm is put together. 

00:17:13

So that was his idea first. That is very good, Which I thought was interesting because yeah, I mean, if you're going to have, cause they'll say, well, I don't know if I put it in here, but the Cole Patterson eventually the name kind of was changed like the Colt, Texas, the Colt Texan, because it was used a lot in Texas. And so, and it was also, it's known as the gun of the wild west. Right. And so having these interchangeable parts was extremely important because you ha I mean, how would you like getting something? And then it breaks. And you're like The whole thing, I can't do anything. 

00:17:56

Cause I can't replace this one part because this one part was made. Right. So he was very intelligent. And the fact that he did come up with that, he actually had, which we'll talk about it. We'll talk about it in a sec. We'll get to, oh yeah. I Samuel's patent for the Colt Patterson gave him the monopoly of revolver manufacturing until 1857. Wow. Quite a while. In the early days of Samuel's life, he always had aspirations to make guns and explosives, his father, Christopher Colt tried to fund his business venture, but there wasn't enough money to do so then Samuel took his show on the road. 

00:18:42

He toured the country lecturing on the virtues of nitrous oxide. And he ended all of the talks with a firework show. Cool. That'll get my attention. And this is what I was gonna say. And then I knew it was coming. He eventually went to England to obtain the first patent for his revolver before coming back to the U S to obtain a patent in the U S his thinking was that if he could get a patent by England, then when he came back to the us, his patent in England would kind of like further validate him getting a patent in the U S Makes Sense because the us was very hesitant. There had already been other people who had submitted patents for revolvers. 

00:19:25

So they were very hesitant. And there was a reason because this was like actually the first practical revolver. That was why he got approved over other people. So that was what he did. It's pretty smart. When he came back, this name will become very important. Okay. He brought with him, Caroline Hinshaw, some sources say that he married her while some historians disagree and say that she merely used him as a means to get to America. Mm. 

00:20:05

From Scotland As a good place to be Either way in 1836, seniors started making guns and Patterson, New Jersey, which is how it got its name, the Colt Patterson, but no one was buying them. It didn't help that the panic of 1837 occurred right after production started, which we have discussed before. And it is one of the worst economic downfalls in us history. I mean, you know, people already had hands that they were probably expensive and, And no one had money like this. This is when the government was like, oh, that money that we borrowed that we gave to you, we need back now. 

00:20:48

And everybody was like, we borrowed it from you. We don't have it. Yeah. Well, and that's what I'm saying. And they didn't have money to buy an extra luxury. They're like, well, we got, we got guns. We w we don't need Any exactly. We Don't need a fancy New one. So in September of 1841, Samuel went to Manhattan to look for more investors. He was drinking at a bar in the city hotel with some potential investors. When John C Colt ran into the bar, looking for him, you might have already guessed by now. But the reason that we had to focus on Samuel Colt for just a bit is because John C Colt was His brother. 

00:21:30

Hmm. Some people have referred to them as the good brother and the bad brother. Good navel, but there is Enabled. Yup. But there is more to both of these men than meets the eye. It Is scandalous. Oh, ma. So we got to jump over now to John Caldwell, Colt. He was born March 1st of 18, 10 in Hartford, Connecticut to his parents, Christopher Colt and Sarah Caldwell Altogether. The couple Had Eight Children. 

00:22:10

Kayla, is that too many? Yes. Okay. I even put too many. Yes. Yes. That's why I asked Too many. However, two of the children died early in their lives. And then Margaret, the oldest daughter died of tuberculosis when John was just 13. Mm. John was sent to Hopkins academy when he was nine, but was taken out a year later after his family kind of like lost all of their money in the panic of 18, 19 again. And John was constantly in trouble in school. So they were just like, we're bringing you back. Yeah. 

00:22:50

When you're, you're not wasting any more money on you. And the tragedy for the Colt family continued when the matriarch of the family Sarah died when John was only 11 of tuberculosis. And then two years after this was when Margaret died, after He lost both of his you mother figures. Okay. He will go on to lose another, His aunt Lucretia stepped in to help care for the kids for a couple of years until Christopher Colt remarried a woman. No. Yep. Remarried to a woman named Olivia Sargent the couple, then had three children together, Heavenly days. 

00:23:37

So 12 children. No, no, no. Three dot two died in early childhood. Then Margaret died. So we're down. We lost three games three, But in Total, yes, They fathered 12. But As far as still living, right. That's that's that way. So, yeah. And it's interesting As a past Lee younguns, as some might say, Well, the new stepmother, Olivia insisted that her stepchildren needed to begin working instead of going to school because the family just didn't have enough money to send all of them. 

00:24:17

Oh, Interestingly enough, it was not her children. So she was making work, you know? So by this time there was only one sister remaining that was Sarah Ann. And she was also like a surrogate mother to her siblings, Malia, Until she was sent off to a relatives house to be a servant. Oh no. All of the changes weighed heavily on John. And he carried locks of hair from his sister, Sarah and Andy and Margaret with him for the rest of his life. That is so sad. 

00:24:59

It gets worse. John worked as an assistant bookkeeper for the union manufacturing company in Marlborough, Connecticut. He quit and moved to Albany New York in less than a year. Then he turned around and returned to Hartford during 1826. And he studied at an academy for three months. Then in the next year, he found employment as a mathematics teacher at a ladies' seminary in Baltimore, Maryland. He was only there for a year. We will continue to see this as a trend for him. He's Kind of restless That does not even like begin to describe, wait till we get to the other list of things that he did. 

00:25:44

So during 1828, he became a supervisory engineer for a canal near Wilkes-Barre Pennsylvania. And the next year, sorry, here is a bit of a trigger warning for just some things. The next year, his sister, Sarah Ann completed suicide by swallowing arsenic. One newspaper account stated it was due to a fight with her stepmother. And another said that she quote, took a morbid view of her doom to labor until her fortitude and her mind gave way. 

00:26:32

That is so sad. Yes, John was absolutely devastated as this was his last sister and also someone who is a mother figure to him And was other naked to help her. And he decided to leave the country and never come back. Well, I mean, Well To do this, he decided he was going to join the United States Marine Corps, where he quickly received orders to the USS constitution. But before he could board the ship, you became extremely sick and ended up working as a clerk in Norfolk, Virginia to Colonel Anderson. 

00:27:17

Hey, So he never made it to this, The USS constitution. You can, you can tour today. Yep. Yep. Yep. It is. It is still there. You can tore it. And my brother has been to the parts that not just anyone gets to see, Well, He's special anyway, Continue now. I, My ears perked up at the, I mean, He, he, He special, He knows those things pretty well. So I would imagine so, so yeah, he ended up working as a clerk instead. So his plans were foiled. Yeah. I said, this wasn't the escape he was looking at. 

00:28:00

So if you joined the military, you really don't have a choice as to where you go. Well, he thought that if he joined the Marine Corps, he would be sent off because The, the thing you get brought back, Well, the USS constitution at the time was heading to the Mediterranean. And so he enlisted specifically to be put on that ship, to go there, but Just a minute to get that. But eventually they bring you back. Well, He hatched a plan, Oh dear. Still sick. But he was not sick enough to receive a medical discharge Mean. So he decided he was going to forge a letter. 

00:28:43

He wrote the letter as if he were a man named George Hamilton. And I put in parentheses, super original, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, just George Hamilton. He said that he was from ware, Massachusetts and stated that his under-aged son ran away from home. And Mr. Hamilton thought that his son had enlisted under the false name of John Colt. He then mailed the letter to his brother, James and asked James to mail the letter to Colonel Anderson from wherever, from like where it not Virginia where Massachusetts, so that when he received it, the postmark would be all Correct. 

00:29:32

That's clever. Yeah. Just to make it like a little bit more, more legit, like, Hmm. This is probably real Colonel Anderson immediately discharged, drawn from duty when he received the letter. How ever It wasn't for fraudulent enlistment Anderson catalog. The reason as a medical discharge. Cause he was insane. I don't know. I think, I think he didn't want to get in trouble for them having someone that fraudulently enlisted Could be kind of covering And he was already sick. 

00:30:14

So he was like the easy Discharged. Let's just do that. Yeah. We'll just say that he was sick because it looks bad on us that we enlisted this guy. Who's supposedly under age. I can see that. That makes so I guess That's why I don't know. But so his official reason for being discharged is medical. He didn't really care cause he got to get the heck out of Dodge. Well, it'll come back to bite him. John went on to be a law clerk for his cousin and he also became a riverboat gambler. And at one point he was challenged to a duel because he was sharing a mistress, Oh, The duel never took place. 

00:30:59

But the reputation of being a bit rough around the edges continued to follow him. He traveled to Vermont during 1830 as a debate coach for the university of Vermont at Burlington. However, he quit after a year when he showed signs of tuberculosis And no, John then traveled to the great lakes region and thinking that, you know, like all of the fresh air and everything would help with his, you know, help with the tuberculosis, Which is what they did. They did. They usually sent people to like mountain areas. Oh, that's where a lot of us saints alums come from. So cause they would build all of these different places. 

00:31:39

It's like a health facility and hospital almost. And they would make like all these balconies and stuff for people to go out on so that they could get fresh air. And a lot of them ended up turning into insane asylums. Interesting. So yeah, he bought a farm when he got there and that was in Michigan. He bought a farm. Is That I bought a farm. I know I'm saying, but He didn't buy the farm. He bought a farm and that was in Michigan. On Goodwin's lake. I may not be saying that correctly, but it's spelled good. N so however his symptoms began again and he left for Cincinnati, Ohio. 

00:32:21

He never stayed in one place too long. And he attempted many business ventures during his time. Mm. Many business spinners. Yes. Can't keep a good man down though. He was a land speculator in Texas, a soap manufacturer in New York, a grocery wholesaler in Georgia. I for trader dry goods, merchant in Florida and an organizer of Mardi Gras, masquerade celebrations in new Orleans, I could do that. And then he eventually ended up in Louisville, Kentucky in 1834. 

00:33:06

This is when he started lecturing on a totalitarian bookkeeping, also known as double entry bookkeeping. Did he know about this? Okay. I mean, Toward the United States giving a series of lectures concerning the topic and by 1837 had begun writing a textbook concerning the subject. So I tried to look up the best way to explain what double entry book keeping is. I am not an accountant. You know, I don't do numbers. I, I do what I can. 

00:33:46

So You know, that, that, that I cried hardest at Geometry. Well, this is the best way. And it actually made sense. Once I found an example. So double entry bookkeeping is a method where every entry to an account requires a corresponding and opposite entry to a different account. Now, for example, if a business takes out a bank loan for $10,000 recording the transaction would require a debit of $10,000 to an asset account that was called cash. 

00:34:35

But then it was also labeled as a credit of $10,000 to a liability. And that account kind of side was called notes payable. So essentially what it did is what the bank does now, where there's a transaction that has shown that shows, okay, this person applied for a bank loan and we're going to give them $10,000. Well, we also have to reflect that the $10,000 came out of this account. And then we also have to show on the person's account that they received a credit of $10,000, essentially what the bank does now you're You're talking. 

00:35:17

I know, but see. So, but listen. No, I totally understand. So It's literally What the bank does now, like where we balance, it's balancing a checkbook and saying, this is where this came from. This is where this went. Yeah. But reflecting it on the other accounts as well of showing that it came and went from, But it's all on one ledger. Yes. Yeah. So yes, His textbook, the Italian science of Book. Nope. This name is so long. The Italian science of double entry bookkeeping simplified, arranged, and methodized Oh, It received great reviews. 

00:36:04

And John had the book published in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Cincinnati. And by 1839, more than 200 schools across the United States were using it. Wow. John eliminated the word Italian from the title for the second edition and included transcripts of his lectures and the newer additions as well. The book ended up having 45 different printings, like different additions, essentially 45 additions. So he was pretty Successful. Yeah. And it was in publication until 1855. 

00:36:47

Nice. John moved to Manhattan and he seemed pretty ready to settle down. He'd finally had a success. He was ready to rest on that, but He rented an office in a building on the corner of Broadway and chambers street. I mean that also housed in a school. So this is kind of, it was, there's a reason he did this. So it housed a school of bookkeeping and penmanship, but it also housed a printer's office. 

00:37:28

Okay. Kind of in his wheelhouse at that time, That printer was Samuel Adams. And I put in parentheses, not the brewer. He died in 1803. It was before this For several months. He had been living with a beautiful young woman and she moved with him to New York as well. Her name was Caroline Hinshaw. Oh this Scottish lass Who may or may not have been married to his brother. 

00:38:08

And how did they end up together? Well, you see what happened was We'll get into it more later. But I will say that a lot of sources that I read did not put two and two together, which was why I had to go back to Samuel Colt And kind of Review and how figure out what all happened. Because While the Colt family did not shy, well, we'll put it this way. Samuel Colt was pretty much the originator of all press is good press. 

00:38:50

So He did not think that negative things coming out in the public eye were actually negative. Like he viewed that as my name is getting out there more. Yeah. Kind of. They're Still hearing about me. Right. So interestingly enough, Caroline Henshaw ended up moving in with John Colt. I know This tangled web will be so much bigger down the line than we think it is late. Like, because that's, what's so funny is I was reading is like, oh, he and he lived with a wonderful woman named Caroline Henshaw. 

00:39:31

And I was like, oh, that's fine. And then I went back to her and I was like, wait A second, Hold on a minute. You mean the girl that came with his brother? That, that one From Scotland, her. Okay. All right. Well, on September 17th, 1841, Samuel Adams went to meet John to collect a debt due for some textbooks that Samuel had printed for him. The two had a heated argument about the final amount that John owed Samuel, a Few words, A few sources say that the discrepancy was over a dollar 35. 

00:40:15

Well, I mean, in that town, that was $500. No, it wasn't. It was like $20. And no, you know, not a hundred is my go-to. I mean, I'm just saying, it's not that much money, Especially when you put it as a dollar 35, like okay. Being so saturating, According To John, Samuel began choking him with his Ascot and pressing him hard against the wall and the table. And Then allegedly, Allegedly, Allegedly In self-defense Always self-defense John reach for what he thought was a hammer to fend him off. 

00:41:05

I mean, cause you just got hammers laying around, But the weapon was not a hammer at all. It was a hatchet. Oh no. And that is where we're going to break for this Episode. Done, done some suspense As to what happens next, because of The way, Let me tell you what happens is astonishing. It is the trial to this case is super sensational and there will be a part that Leah is not going to like, and I will make sure that she contains her outrage. 

00:42:03

So I will just say that the next part, not only will we get fully into what happens next after this, we will also dig into the trial and this trial was it, there are no words, but the reason that we're splitting this up into two is because the story doesn't end after the trial, There is a lot more that comes after this. And there is a lot of scandal that comes along with it. That's so sad As well. Well, the scandal is within the Colt family Figured, And this was another one of those cases where I had to kind of put too, like I said before, like I had to put things together from different sources to figure out exactly what was happening and exactly what some sources were meaning from others. 

00:43:04

Very sad when people can't get along, but it's even worse when it's family. Oh no, they get along fine. That's not the issue whale. Oh, they get along. That's not . That is not the issue. So like I said, it's very interesting. So leave you there at a cliffhanger for this week. It's the first time we've done that too. We have a website where you can find any and all. And when you see information, you're looking for it's one nation under crime.com. We are one nation under crime on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and act oh, in UC pod on Twitter. 

00:43:45

If you love our podcast, as much as we do, please follow us on all of our platforms and recommend us to your friends and family. Also, please go onto apple iTunes and give us a five-star review with a comment. Those that mean a lot to us. We will still send you a prize. If you do that, we also have a Patrion. If you guys would like to help with the cost of making and hosting the show And you should go get our undying love, You also get pretty good perks too. There's there's a lot of different things that you can get on there. And you know what I just thought about this. What if you're a Patrion subscriber, I'm going to go ahead and put episode two up on the patriarch. 

00:44:33

The day episode one comes out. So if you are a Patrion subscriber, you can go over to the Patrion feed and get episode two right now, like as soon as we're done with this episode hop over there and I will go ahead and release episode two there. That is a big bonus because I'm about to know what went on and I get to find out in just a couple of minutes. Y'all got to wait unless you're a Patrion. So I will do that for our patrons this month. That'll kind of be all goodie for this month is to get early access to the episode that comes next. 

00:45:17

So Aren't you lucky, lucky deck. If you're a patron, we will see you in just a few minutes. If you are not, you should be, but we still love you. We will see you here. Same time, same Crime Next week. And remember there isn't always Liberty and justice for all, Unfortunately, But I mean, you know, you're part of the Colt family, I guess you have a lot of money and it's still still anyways that no, no justice, no Liberty. Nope. Is how it is that by.