Dec. 8, 2021

USBS: The One Where Tomatoes Were Put On Trial


Welcome to the second bonus episode of USBS! As a holiday treat, the ONUC gals wanted to give you something a little extra to help you get through the weeks ahead. Each week from now until the end of the year, there will be a bonus episode of USBS for you to enjoy. These are history episodes where the gals will discuss events, topics, or people who are interesting in the United States.

Kayla has teased the possibility of exclusive episodes on Patreon and here we are! This is a sample of the episodes you will be able to listen to as an ONUC Patreon donor beginning January 2022. AND as a Patreon donor you'll even be able to submit requests for topics you want covered!

Join the ONUC gals over the next few weeks as they discuss some of the BS in the US!

Visit our website www.onenationundercrime.com for all of the ways to contact and follow us. We are on Twitter @onucpod, Instagram @onenationundercrime, and on both YouTube and Facebook by searching 'One Nation Under Crime'.

Follow One Nation Under Crime on your favorite podcast platform and you will get the shows as soon as they come out!

Remember, there isn't always liberty and justice for all.

Sources: Smithsonian Mag, Grunge, and History 101

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/onenationundercrime)
Transcript

You are listening to a bonus episode of USBs, where we discuss the historical BS of the U S these are the episodes that cover a wide variety of historical topics. Never know what you're going to get could be a person, could be an event either way. We promise that we'll have a good time and learn maybe something along the way. So it's good time with us. I'm Kayla and I'm Leah. Let's get in to it. Yes, we have. Let's see our sources for this week. We have the Smithsonian magazine. We have a website called grunge.com. 

0  

00:00:40

That sounds fun. And history 1 0 1. Oh. So I took that in college. I took a few history classes in college, actually. So this week we are covering a very interesting subjects. Tomatoes, tomatoes. Yes. And stick with me. I promise the topic of tomatoes is worth it. All right. You are. You're not, I don't like them cold. Well, for almost 200 years, 200 tomatoes were one of the most feared fruits in the Western world feared for 200 years feared, feared. 

0  

00:01:27

Like you think I'm kidding. Absolutely. Yes. So the tomato was the light. Was this light people like on stage, like, oh no, I'm doing a bad job. He has a tomato. Like I've seen that. Yes. Oh, that has something to do with it as well. In Europe when people would throw tomatoes on the stage, someone saying it's because they were people thought they were deadly, they made messes. Awesome. Okay. Continues. I'm even more intrigued. Exactly. And they were so feared. In fact, that in 1820 tomatoes were put on trial in Salem, New Jersey put on trial. 

0  

00:02:14

So what, so this week, the BS that we've uncovered is the Salem tomato trial. How would you punished things? So the popularity of tomatoes really grew in the 15 hundreds. Tomatoes were a staple in Aztec cuisine. And when Spanish conquistador is returned to their Homeland from Mexico and Mesoamerica, they brought tomato seeds with them. Then the Spaniards took the fruit with them to their colonized countries in Asia and the Caribbean. But when it was brought to England, it was avoided as if it were the plague. 

0  

00:02:56

Hmm. The Europeans called them the apple. And before we get into the reasoning behind what was actually happening at this time, we have to go a little bit into the tomato itself. Okay. And I'm telling you guys, this is truly interesting. So we'll, we'll get there deals with poison deals, with actual things. So aphrodisiacs. Yeah. An Italian herbalists name. P Tara, Andre Matha. Holy easy for you to say. Yeah, maybe I said that, right. 

0  

00:03:37

He was one of the earliest people to reference tomatoes and he actually classified them as a night shade and a Mandarin. Ah, do you know what a Mandrake is? The other word for Mandrake aphrodisiac? Hmm. So all I could think of was Harry, I never in the fruit and the screaming, well mandrakes are class of aphrodisiacs. So some people might know the term night shade from true crime because of the plant, a Tropo Bella, Donna, which is also called Belladonna and deadly night shade. 

0  

00:04:17

I mean, I didn't know because of that, but I did know that night shade was bad. Bill Madonna is extremely toxic when ingested and it contains TRO pain alkaloids, which an example of a Tropin alkaloid is going to be like , which is what they'll give women who are pregnant, who were like really sick. You'll sometimes get scopolamine patches for like seasickness okay. And cocaine. So, you know, just whatever, you know, whatever the mill. And then, I mean, Coca-Cola so well who knows these alkaloids are known to cause delirium and hallucinations sounds like a fun time. 

0  

00:05:01

I mean, depends on what you're looking for, but I'm just kidding by the way, has for a Mandrake, it is referred to an early texts and Hebrew, as I believe it's due dime, which is roughly translated to love apple. So these classifications not only made the tomato seem poisonous, but also as a sign of temptation elicit in 1597, John Gerard came out with a publication called earth ball and it's herbal because it's H E R B a L L or ball or ball. 

0  

00:05:45

This text is what really did the tomato in. Honestly, although the text was mostly plagiarized from agricultural work studies done in 1553 and it also was not entirely accurate. It was widely produced. And so it still made a big impact. Gerard wrote that the whole plant was considered to be poisonous instead of focusing on the small minuscule parts of the tomato plant that people needed to be cautious of. Gerard's texts began the 200 year fear of tomatoes and the Smithsonian article. 

0  

00:06:30

They said, quote, John Parkinson, the apothecary to king James, the first and botanist for king Charles. The first proclaimed that while love apples were eaten by the people in the hot countries to cool and quench the heat and thirst of hot stomachs, British gardeners grew them only for curiosity and for the beauty of the fruit. 

1  

00:06:58

Okay. 

0  

00:06:59

So he was essentially saying like, yeah, people in hot countries like eat them because they quench your thirst and like, they get hot enough. So maybe it kills everything, but we're only growing them because they're pretty, 

1  

00:07:19

But it isn't pretty good 

0  

00:07:22

Wells. And these times you are most likely to see tomatoes as decor and people's homes. So instead of like, people put like a bat, a basket of like apples and put them all pretty on the counter in it, they would do tomatoes. 

1  

00:07:36

So instead y'all tonight is bad, so easily and quickly. And fun fact, I didn't know that a word that I had used my entire life was not generally used in America until I was in middle school. And it has to do with tomatoes and tomatoes get all yucky and like, you know, mili, no, not mealy, but like when the, when they get a bad spot in them and they get like fungus 

0  

00:08:02

<em></em> okay. 

1  

00:08:04

Well, we always said Firstie oh yeah. I told you this, 

0  

00:08:11

My boyfriend uses that term. Cause he's a cook. So he uses that term sometimes for, for different things 

1  

00:08:19

Is a Scottish term. I didn't know that I brought that out when I was in middle school and I was with my friends. They were like, I'm sorry, what? And I was like, it's, Firstie, it's gross. They were like, what are you talking about? You know, middle school is bad to be different at all. So, so yeah. So in tomatoes get yuck and you know, like, oh, they're 50. So there you go. 

0  

00:08:41

It's interesting. My boyfriend uses that term when he talks about certain vegetables or certain things like that. So I like him even more. I've learned quite a few things as far as cooking goes, 

1  

00:08:53

Like how to, yeah, pretty much. 

0  

00:08:55

I mean how to correctly, at least. So later in 17, 10, the first reference to the tomato was published in the British colonies by William salmon. So a salmon wrote about tomatoes, like a fish, like a fish. That's how it spelled there. Again, doctors started for not pronouncing the L salmon pet P Saulman, pet peeve. I love . I get on him all the time. Yeah. It's doctor started warning people and advising against eating them and claimed that they had seen effects of eating the tomatoes, the effects they claim to see included appendicitis and stomach cancer. 

0  

00:09:39

Oh, heavens. But aren't you ready for? Y oh dear. Even at the end of the sentence I put LOL because the tomato skins adhered to the lining of the stomach, therefore causing stomach cancer, bless and just put dot, dot, dot, LOL. I mean like they come off the tomato and intentionally like adhere to the side of your stomach. If you've ever liked blanched it tomato. And you've seen the skin like this suckers will stick to you. Yeah. But not like you got enough stomach acid to dry, but if you see an outside of the stomach, I mean, it's, it feels will stick to you. 

0  

00:10:22

It's funny. How ever remember I said that I'll get to the real reason that tomatoes were poisonous. I'm ready. The culprit was actually what they were eating off of, not what they were eating. It turned out the pewter plates of the wealthy contained significantly high lead content. The acid in the tomatoes brought out this poison and people actually started dying of lead poisoning, but it was the tomatoes that was causing the poison to leech out of the plates because of their acidity because of the acidity. 

0  

00:11:02

Yikes. So according, just FYI, in case you, you needed to know lead poisoning, isn't too much of a big issue today. Sometimes an older houses, people have lead paint, but Keisha ever wondering, or you think you may be poisoned as well. According to the Mayo clinic, lead poisoning symptoms include headaches, abdominal pain, high blood pressure, muscle pain, mood disorders, and digestive disorders. So you can see how people would think that or these doctors will call. So and so doctors, medical professionals in the 17 hundreds were saying that it was causing appendicitis and stomach cancer because it did cause abdominal pain and digestive disorder and muscle pain and different things like that. 

0  

00:11:54

But yeah, it was just the lead. It wasn't the tomatoes at all for their plates. 

1  

00:11:58

So, but you know, association, the tomatoes did cause it that they had, they had, they did play a part in causing it. But so it wasn't the tomatoes, 

0  

00:12:11

The implication by everyone was that tomatoes themselves were poisonous. It took them many years to put two and two together because if you ate off of the pewter plates and you didn't have anything acidic, there wasn't too much of a risk of dying or anything from them. So they were thinking that the tomatoes were poisonous because they were eating off the 

1  

00:12:32

Leave thing that's added in. I mean, 

0  

00:12:35

It's, it's, it's so funny. So, well, not funny. It is funny. You met me. So now I get to introduce to you the other star of this story. His name is Robert, given Johnson, also known as Colonel Johnson. I do not think you were ready for the list of things he did. Oh dear. I will say that he is from Salem, New Jersey 

1  

00:13:06

And everything is legal in New Jersey. Correct. 

0  

00:13:09

And like I said, he was known as a Colonel. He was a gentleman farmer O which is a form that is not-for-profit. They're just like a fun, a fun farm where you just live there. But so he was a gentleman farmer, a historian, a horticulturalist, a judge, a soldier, and a statesman. 

1  

00:13:33

All of us, a couple of things, 

0  

00:13:36

Just a little bit. Colonel Johnson was born on July 23rd, 1771 at his great uncle's home called new Netherland farm. Oh, he was the only child born to his parents, Robert and Jane. Then in March of 1778, unfortunately the British raided his home in Salem during the revolutionary war in several towns, people were killed. Their home was the largest in the area. And so the British took over their home and the family was imprisoned in their house for several dates. Not cool, even though he was only seven at the time, he is the one who led his mother away to safety. 

1  

00:14:21

Oh, that's a good delirious. 

0  

00:14:24

Eventually he went to Newark academy in Delaware and then onto Princeton Princeton, where he graduated in 1790. He decided to practice law. But instead he focused on agriculture for most of his life. And he managed the family estate. He went on to marry Hannah Carney on June 19th, 1798 and the had four children during their marriage. However, only two of them survived past infancy. They had a daughter named Anne and a son named Robert Han. 

0  

00:15:05

And then Robert was the dad right after the couple's marriage. Colonel Johnson built a house called Johnson hall, which today is still located in Salem. The structure itself did move from the original location, but you can still see Johnson hall today in Salem, New Jersey. That is amazing to me that they move houses. Yeah. They had to move it because they built a courthouse in the original location, but they just picked up the house and moved it to another area. Have you seen this happen before I've watched this? It is the coolest thing. It's one of the coolest and scariest things I've ever seen. Correct. It's I'm holding my breath while I'm watching TV. It's terrifying because some there, I mean, like we know there are like manufactured homes where they do like take the helm. 

0  

00:15:52

Yeah. And they put it together, like on the land when they get there and it's a house like it's competent to be mobile. Right. But then you take a house that is not mobile and you make it mobile. It was built in this one place. And that's it's yeah. It's pretty scary. I had a uncle who has a very large farm kind of in the outer Birmingham area. And for the longest time there was a small house on his property. It was kind of like falling down and everything, but it was his grandfather's house at one point. So for the longest time, it was really creepy, like real creepy at night. 

0  

00:16:35

And it was right beside like their house on the property. So you would see it at night, but it was real creepy. And eventually he wanted to move it because he built anyways, he built like another little house on the property that was like, anyways, it was like a, he kind of used it as, what do you call it? Like a mother-in-law suite? No, like there wasn't running water. There wasn't anything like, like a pump house that a, it had a bed in it. It had a living room, it had everything like that, but it was just like bare minimum essential. So he would leave like his house and then he would go like to the other side of the property and stay in the social things. 

0  

00:17:17

Portraits of solid, I guess. So it was really cool, but he moved the house and he moved. And so I got to actually physically see them move the house and it was nerve wracking. It was so scary. So cause he was trying to keep as much of the support structure. Good. But I mean, the house was falling apart. Like it was so, so old. So yeah, I've seen it happen before and it is quite terrifying in person I can. And then I'm pretty sure once they got it to where it was supposed to be and they went to get it off of the trucks, I'm pretty sure they had like a big, big issue. 

0  

00:18:00

I think a lot of it fell apart then, but very, it is very weird to see a physical house being moved. So Colonel Johnson's first wife, Hannah only lived until the age of 30 and her son, their son, Robert was still young. A few years later, he married 32 year old Juliana Zandt zinger. 

1  

00:18:24

That is a new 

0  

00:18:25

Name fan zinger. Zanta Zynga. They were married 41 years. Wow. Before she died and that couple did not have any children together. So Juliana helped raise Hannah, Hannah, and Robert's original children and, and Robert, but they never had any children themselves. So I just always thought I was like, that's sweet is as far as his military service goes, he saw a good bit of action during the whiskey rebellion. He continued to rise through the ranks and was known to be an expert equestrian even into his seventies. Wow. And at that time that was like a hundred. 

0  

00:19:05

So he was also commissioner of the loan office for the county. And he provided mortgages to local farmers to help with their cashflow. He established the first Presbyterian church in Salem and was a member of the New Jersey legislature for more than one term. He served for several terms as judge was a trustee for a Delaware college, as well as the Princeton theological seminary. And he was a founding member of the New Jersey historical society 

1  

00:19:38

Mean, he sounds like a very interesting guy. 

0  

00:19:41

Yes. Very had a lot, get a lot, a lot on his plate, but I mean not a pewter plate, but 

1  

00:19:49

A plate. I mean, he sounds like, like, you 

0  

00:19:51

Know, everything 

1  

00:19:53

That you would love to just sit down and talk to, like, he would just be really interesting to sit and just have a conversation with. And he could probably speak with anybody. You know what I mean? 

0  

00:20:04

Because not only was he like a judge and he was a state legislature, you know, he worked for the state legislature and everything like that. But they also said a majority of his life, he spent working on his family's estate. Yeah. So like he was a former essentially. 

1  

00:20:20

He was a common man, but an uncommon. 

0  

00:20:25

Exactly. So it's very, very interesting getting to read about him. And I put, so WTF does he have to do with tomatoes along with all of his other accolades, he was an active horticulturalist. And he was also the president of the New Jersey horticultural society, as well as everything else just needed. Another thing to fill 

1  

00:20:54

If he was active, you know, if he, if you did the farm, it makes sense that he would be interested in that. And it sounds like he, whatever he did, he didn't just dabble. You know what I mean? Yeah. It makes sense that he wants to know about and be involved in. 

0  

00:21:10

Oh yeah. He was, he just fascinating. He had a lot to a lot in his life. So clearly he had a bit of knowledge when it came to agriculture and he did not believe that tomatoes were poisonous. In fact, he ate them regularly. He brought tomato seeds home one time after traveling abroad. And he started to hold yearly competitions on who could grow the largest tomato, but people still thought they were poisonous. And the towns, people thought that Colonel Johnson was absolutely crazy. Why would this man have a tomato growing competition when it could kill him Crazy Colonel in sane. 

0  

00:21:55

So as a judge, he decided to put the tomato on trial itself. He decided the best way to do that was by demonstration. Well, on June 28th, 1820, he stood on the steps of the courthouse and addressed a crowd of around 2000 people. The following is an excerpt from the Salem county historical society quote, Colonel Johnson announced that he would eat a tomato, also called the Wolf peach Jerusalem, apple, or love apple on the steps of the county courthouse at noon that morning in 1820, about 2000 people were jammed into the town square. 

0  

00:22:37

The spectators began to hoot and jeer. Then 15 minutes later, Colonel Johnson emerged from his mansion and headed up market street towards the courthouse. The crowd cheered the Fireman's band, struck up a lively tune. He was a very impressive looking man. As he walked along the street, he was dressed in his usual black suit with white ruffles, black shoes and gloves, tricorn hat and cane at the courthouse steps. He spoke to the crowd about the history of the tomato. He picked a choice, one from the basket on the steps and held it up so that it glistened in the sun. 

0  

00:23:19

He said to help dispel the tall tales, the fantastic fables you have been hearing and to prove to you that it is not poisonous. I am going to eat one right now. There was not a sound as the Colonel dramatically brought the tomato to his lips and took a bite, a woman in the crowd, screamed and fainted. But no, but no one paid attention to her. They weren't. I mean, they were all watching Colonel James, as he took one bite after another, he raised both arms and again, bit into one than the other, the crowd cheered and the Fireman's band blared a song he's done it. 

0  

00:24:07

They shouted he's still alive is ridiculous. So that's what happened on the day that the tomato was put on trial. The people at the courthouse were so nervous that Colonel Johnson was in fact going to drop dead immediately that they had a doctor on standby just in case, just in case, just in case something were to happen. So, oh my word, this wasn't the end of the suspicions around tomatoes. Although tomato recipes started flooding the local papers and people started growing them to eat themselves. A new concern arose in the 1830s. When the tomato was cultivated in New York, a new menace, if you will called the green tomato worm. 

0  

00:24:57

Oh no. This death monster measured at approximately three to four inches long. We sit the horn worm with a horn sticking out of its bag. Oh yeah. It started to play tomato patches across the state. They glow in a black light. Did you know that? Yes. Did I steal your thunder? No. Okay. They didn't have black lights back then. Well, I don't know if you're going to know them to the modern day famous writer, which we know him. Ralph Waldo, Emerson stated they were quote an object of much terror. It being currently regarded as poisonous and imparting a poisonous quality to the fruit of it should chance to crawl upon it. 

0  

00:25:45

A man captured one of the elusive beasts in a jar and said that it was quote poisonous as a rattlesnake, which was quote a new enemy to human existence. Last little crazy, thankfully, an entomologist, which is someone who studies insects named Benjamin Walsh stepped forward and said quote, now that we have become familiarized with these fears, all have vanished and we have become quite indifferent towards this creature, knowing it will be merely an ugly looking worm, which eats some of the leaves of the tomato fears were finally put to rest. 

0  

00:26:25

And the tomato became one of the most sought after crops in the United States. And, and by 1897, a wholesale fruit and vegetable vendor by the name of Joseph we'll call him Joseph C for now. He came along and experimented with canning tomatoes and salt that they kept really well inside containers. He can them to make condensed tomato soup. And Joseph Campbell is the founder of Campbell soup company. Cool. So that is how the tomato was put on trial. That's awesome. That's the story? So tomatoes, they were a menace to society. Then we had the poisonous rattlesnake that tried to do was all in. 

1  

00:27:08

That's really just the horn work. And I got to say, now the horn worm, they 

0  

00:27:12

Do look pretty nasty. They do, but they're 

1  

00:27:14

Really, they're pretty. I mean, I know, I mean, it's, it's a caterpillar, a worm. 

0  

00:27:21

It looks like a caterpillar, but 

1  

00:27:24

They're really kind of cool looking and they do, they glow and a black light. And I know this because both my sister and my brother grew tomatoes the past two summers, I believe. And they got the black light out because they were getting into their tomatoes and it's a really 

0  

00:27:44

Good way to find them. It really is. And 

1  

00:27:46

Then, you know, it was really cool. My sister sent a picture. She was like, they really do glow. And I mean, it was pretty cool. And man, those things are thick. They are, 

0  

00:27:54

Which I mean, I can understand one just 10 years ago, everyone thought that the tomato was poisonous and it was going to kill them on the spot. And 

1  

00:28:03

Now this big thick, 

0  

00:28:04

Juicy looking nasty worm with a, with a horn coming out of its bag. It's not really a horn. Well, that's what they called it. And I mean, I, I get it, but it's just so funny to think of like a time when people thought that tomatoes were just like poisonous, like you could not eat them. And they, it was just funny because they were referring to it as the love apple. Yes. And the poisonous apple, 

1  

00:28:29

They call it the 

0  

00:28:30

Wolf's Wolf's peach. Wolf's, that's what you can start calling it from now on. When you tell your husband to go pick up something, you can tell him, I need you to pick up three Wolf peaches while you're there and see how long it takes them to figure it out. 

1  

00:28:43

I say, now my mom, she could eat a tomato. Like she would just eat like an apple, like he did on the steps. I don't love to met us that much. Now I'll eat tomatoes in a salad. 

0  

00:28:58

I only recently started eating tomatoes and a salad, 

1  

00:29:01

But I don't like them. If they're cold. See, 

0  

00:29:03

I do like cold tomatoes. I don't wanna, 

1  

00:29:06

I don't, I don't, I don't like, like if they've been refrigerated and they're really, really cold, I don't like that, but 

0  

00:29:12

Not that cold. 

1  

00:29:13

Yeah. That's I don't, I don't like him like that, but yeah, mom can just sprinkle salt on it and just go to town. 

0  

00:29:20

My boyfriend probably could do that. He honestly could. I mind if I eat a tomato, it's gotta be sliced. Like if it's, if I'm eating a tomato by itself and our international listeners are gonna be like, what the, you have to slice the tomato. How good? Like fix slices. Can you just have like run of the mill slices? You put salt and pepper on it. Stick with me guys. One, you have to use a particular kind Duke's mayonnaise on the tomato a little bit. Not a lot. Just a little bit for tomato sandwich. I'm just the tomato. 

0  

00:30:01

Well, I had a slice of cheese. I have like, I have like a gluten allergy. So I have to be careful, man. Well, I mean, I'll eat it. But a lot of times when I was younger in my granny would do that. Look, I'm abandonment. A's girl, by the way, Duke's is way better, but we're not here to debate that what we can debate, what we can debate. And I believe everyone in the United States should be on the same page with this. And if you're not, I apologize. But I think universally, everyone can agree that miracle whip is trash. Oh God. Yeah. It's disgusting. It's not one time. And I know that my mom is listening, but I remember one time when I was younger, first of all, we stayed, we went to the beach. 

0  

00:30:48

That's always a fun time. But so we went to the beach and we were staying in someone's camper. And I know she's probably, she knows where this is going already because we stayed in someone's camper at the beach. We were going with someone whose family lived down there and it was in Panama city. So we stayed at this place that was like an RV, like campground. This campground was called raccoon river raccoon river. And it was like a mile away from the beach. So anyways, I digress still close. So one day the raccoon river, it just cracked me up. 

0  

00:31:31

So one day we go back to the camper. I think like we had been somewhere trash Panda though. Well, let me tell you this place was nothing. It was bad. Anyways. I'll never forget. We went to go check in and lady at the front desk, she was like, welcome to raccoon river. And I was like, oh, so anyways, that's always been, the joke is it's a raccoon river rat Kuhn. So I remember one day we went back to the RV and we were going to eat lunch and I will never forget my mom was making sandwiches. And this is one of those things. 

0  

00:32:12

That's like the weirdest things that you remember as a child. And she made the sandwiches with miracle whip. Oh no. And I was so hungry and I was so mad. I refuse to eat it because miracle whip is disgusting and everybody knows that. And I was crying because I did not want and keep in mind, I was in like middle school. I was not a small child. I was like that going into middle school. Like it was a whole. And so I remember vividly hysterically crying over miracle web because I was like, it is so disgusting. I don't even know why it's a thing. 

0  

00:32:51

And let me tell you something else too. If you look at the thing of miracle wit she has her finger out gals pointing around. If you look at the thing of miracle whip and the store, it does not say that it's man, it does not hold a sandwich dressing. Yeah. That's that's not even Manet's, that's disgusting, but famous the best I it's. I can't. It's just which actually, so as I've told you all before, speaking of like, we're going to get on the mayonnaise trail, my boyfriend's also like a huge fan of Duke's mayonnaise and that's the one that we always get and, and Dick's is okay, I will, I will get, it is not available. 

0  

00:33:37

Duke's has a little bit of a different taste to it. There is a reason to it. I can't remember why, but it's the reason that I like it better. Whatever's in it. So anyways, there is a Japanese mayonnaise and it's called QP and it is so good. And a lot of like really fancy chefs when they're like, they're going to use mayonnaise, but they don't want to say they're using mayonnaise. They say that they're going to use QP. There's actually some in the fridge. It comes in a very weird bottle anyways, but it's called CUPE in it. We were, I put it on something one day and we were talking about it and he went to eat it. And he was like, they really just put Duke's mayonnaise into a different container. 

0  

00:34:20

Didn't they? And I was like, and I sat there for a second and we tried both of them. And I was like, they've really did like, and he goes, that was not a keep in mind. They label it as Japanese mayonnaise and you have to go specifically, get it at like the Japanese market. Right. And he lives a close ish to one. So we've been to the Japanese market multiple times or the Asian market. And he goes, I mean, QP is really good. It's not worth the $8 a bottle, $8. I looked at him like he had lost his ever loving mind. I was like, what? 

0  

00:35:02

It's it's how much now what? I bought a jug of duty? Like, what are we doing? But, oh gosh, the miracle whip. It I'm scarred for life of deer. So my grainy would only use Bama, man. This was before Dukes was like a really good thing. So she would always use Bama mayonnaise, but oh gosh. Like if I am telling you, I apologize. If anyone listening likes miracle, but it's trash and that's where it belongs. It's just how the light it, how the world turns. It's just, honestly, I don't know is fat. I don't know why they sell it in every time. 

0  

00:35:46

Which is funny. Cause I like, as y'all y'all should know by now we're like 30 episodes deep at this point. So y'all should know. I'm weird. Every time I'll go to the store to get mayonnaise, I always look over at the miracle whip to see any of it. Some Sada I'll see if any of them are missing blank, just to see like, is anybody buying any of this garbage? And then like, let me tell you, somebody comes up beside me and grabs it, stare at them. Like I am S I'm 

1  

00:36:20

Sorry. Did you mean to pick 

0  

00:36:21

That up? Did you have COVID where you lost your taste and smell? Cause I did. I did. I did lose my taste and smell for a lot. And I understand you can't tell the difference. You don't know the errors of your ways, but this is gross. Here's the bad, well it's I just, I can't, but I mean, I'm sure there are tons of other people. Like I'm sure people outside of our country are like, can you use Manet? A 

1  

00:36:49

Mother doesn't like me? And I said, oh, you 

0  

00:36:51

Don't know. That's what I'm saying. Like, that would make sense. Cause she's not from here. Like I'm sure that wasn't a thing on the tomatoes, 

1  

00:36:57

Which where I would put. And I don't like a lot of Manet's I will say. I mean, just to neck, to, to moisten the bread is, is all like just make a barrier. But mother puts butter on her to 

0  

00:37:12

Increase, to do that. She would put butter on her tomato sandwiches, tomato sandwich. If you could a good tomato sandwich, a good tomato seam, which is good. My, I told you about, let me tell you, I'm blessed. I'm blessed with this boyfriend. He made this, told you about the tomato salad. That if I, if I, if I were on death row, this would be my last meal. Like it would or way 

1  

00:37:43

What about the hash brown? 

0  

00:37:45

Oh, that is true. So he did make a hat. Oh, let me tell you those are my two things. Death row. Those are the two things I'm going to have. And I'm going to be like, look, if he's, if he's gone, you're going to have to bring him back from the dead. I don't know what kind of say aunts. We have to have here to make this happen and people, I can't give away his hashbrown secret. I can't give it away, but it's it's I will say that it involves a fish and it involves hashbrowns and it sounds disgusting. And it's one of the best things I've ever eaten in my entire life. And even when he told me he was going to make it, I don't, he said it and I, I was like, okay, sure, sure, honey sounds, sounds great. 

0  

00:38:30

And then I ate it and I was like, this is possibly the best thing that I've ever tasted in my 

1  

00:38:34

Entire life when 

0  

00:38:36

She thinks about it. That and the tomato salad are so, so good. We have a restaurant in the area that makes this tomato salad and that's where he got the recipe from. It's one of it's it's not shave on fawn or anything like that. I don't even think it's Highlands. It might be like Botega or something like that. It's one of those restaurants that we have downtown that are like James Beard award winners and all those, it was, yeah, it was a recipe from one of them. And it's it's it says it's a tomato salad. It's not, but it's the best thing that I've ever. So 

1  

00:39:10

We're glad tomato was found. Not guilty. 

0  

00:39:13

I am. Yes, because had I not ever had this tomato salad in my life, you'd have a void. I would have avoid avoid that. I didn't know was there, but avoid nonetheless. It's just absolutely amazing. So I'm very, very glad that the tomato was not found to be poisonous. Even though for most of my life, I did not eat tomatoes until I started seeing my boyfriend. Now I did not eat tomatoes on things like when it 

1  

00:39:38

Gets you into eggs, next 

0  

00:39:40

I've done better. I ha I mating out. I made him fried eggs this morning. I heard you say that. So that's, that's a branch out for me. Anyways. Big, bad breakfast has this one thing for breakfast that has X anyways, I can't continue. It has ham powder in it. I know that sounds weird, guys. I understand. Sounds a little vile. We have a lot of Birmingham listeners in this area. Y'all know what big, bad breakfast is. I'm just telling you go look at the menu. I will never steer you wrong, honestly. Well, I mean, so breakfast, you know, that's just how things are, but you know, it's fine. 

0  

00:40:20

Just glad that it's just cracks me up, that a guy had to go stand on the courthouse steps and eat tomatoes to one woman screaming and fainting. 

1  

00:40:31

That does it for me. That's hilarious. Really? I wonder if she really find it, like, she's probably just what you know, there's always one drama. 

0  

00:40:41

That's true. There's one you and the audience do that. No, I said just drama. Not, not, not to that low. I'm just saying there's got to be one layout and dramatic. 

1  

00:40:52

There's not 

0  

00:40:53

Drama. There's gotta be one Leah. And there's gotta be one Kayla standing beside her that just looks over like, can you not today? Can we not? Look, I'm not that kind of drama. Not that kind of drama, but not that drama. It's always gotta be always gotta be one. So I hope you liked our second bonus episode of USC. We have another one coming up that I think you'll find very interesting. As I said, these are kind of episodes that it's kind of stuff in the U S that maybe not a lot of people know about. Maybe, maybe it's something you've heard 

1  

00:41:29

Of. I had not heard of this woman. You 

0  

00:41:31

Mentioned it. I an actually in our episode on 1820, it was one of our events that I discussed in that. And it was just like a S just a wine. But yeah, I ended up looking into and is crazy. So we have some other things coming up that are going to be very interesting as far as they go. Sometimes it's something that we've always used or we've always heard. And we never really quite knew where that came from and dig a little deeper. I'll give you a hint as to next week we might be covering, we'll say that it is a figure of sorts and he wants a big, it'll be a figure that a lot of people will recognize. 

0  

00:42:24

And there is a good story behind this figure. So hope that you all will stick around for that. Got some interesting tidbits in it as well. And I hope that you all enjoyed our normal episode this week as well. And we have a website where you can find any and all Owen USI, and really any USBs information that you're looking for. It's one nation under crime.com. We are one nation under crime on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and at Owen, see pod on Twitter, go leave us a five-star review. And if you do leave a comment, we got to see the comment on there. It counts more. If we see a comment, so go leave one on there. We do have a Patrion. If you would like to join and help with costs of banking, hosting the show. 

0  

00:43:07

Keep in mind we are doing these episodes as a bit of a bonus through the holiday season, but once we get into 20, 22, they will move over to our Patrion. So just keep that in mind for when that comes up. Thank you guys for listening to the second bonus episode of USBs. We will see you here next time with more BS from the us. Always remember, regardless of what our first grade teachers told us there isn't always Liberty and justice for all. Nope.