July 5, 2021

1806: The Purrington Family Massacre

1806: The Purrington Family Massacre

The Purrington family seemed to have it all from the outside looking in. But, there were troubles lurking beneath the surface. In this episode the ONUC gals cover the Purrington family massacre. The gals also dive into NKOTB (Leah gets very riled up) and discuss the term 'money can't buy you happiness'.

Trigger Warning Level: Medium
Description starts at 39:11 and ends at 43:35. 

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Sources: Touring Maine History, Southend Stories, Parkaman Magazine, Strange New England, and Murder She Told 

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Transcript

You are listening to one nation under crime, a chronological true crime podcast. Each week, we go through our nation's history and discuss one case from each year, starting in 1800. I'm Kayla and I'm Leah and we're two episode eight made it to eight. Eight is great. I know if you listened to our last episode, you know, that eight is one of his favorite numbers. It is my favorite number. Not one of it is so sorry. So yeah, this week, this week we got an interesting case. Interesting. I'll say that I'll go ahead and put it out there. This is probably a medium level trigger warning case, and we'll go over it when we get to it, but it does deal with an entire family. 

0  

00:00:45

So that's not so great. Obviously murder and crime is never good, which is social listening to the podcast, sinister hood the other day, and which such a great name for a podcast sinister hood. They do like cryptids, which are said the podcast of Mr. Hood sinister hood do like cryptids, which are like Bigfoot Nessy. And they do episodes about that. But then they do episodes on an se Israel. So it was Bigfoot saying was known as he's real. 

0  

00:01:29

He's real quick anyways. So they, but they cover crime. They cover like a huge wide variety of things. And one of the things that they talked about on their show the other day is it's an older episode, I think, is from earlier this year, but was why women are so invested in true crime, specifically women, because a lot of women do follow true crime. I mean, look at the oxygen channel, the oxygen channel. It used to not be crime 24 7. They just did that in the past few years. But it was so interesting because movies are centered around a crime. 

0  

00:02:11

Right. So what's so funny about it is that personally I have theories, but personally it's one of those things of like, as women, like we want to know kind of things about it. But as women, a lot of times with brutal crimes, like we're often a target. So one of the things that they discussed, which was interesting was that you want to know more about it because it could happen. You wanna know how to protect yourself, right. So I guess that would kind of be it. And I, and I mean, personally for me, it's always a why I'm always thinking, why, why did, why this happen? 

0  

00:02:59

Why, you know, why did you think of this or, or anything like that. And we'll see, in this case that there's some speculation as to why, and things could have gone very differently, which is unfortunate. In some cases, this is also a case that we'll get to it in a bit, but very, very hard to find information on, even though it is a very fascinating case. And it's very interesting had to use some sources that I don't like to use and we'll get to it. 

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00:03:43

So our sources for this week, touring main history, south end stories, park, women magazine, strange new England and murderer. She told mergers, she told we'll get to it. Is that like murder? She wrote yes. Play on that. Yes. So this is like I said, episode eight, this is about the Parrington family massacre. Hurry, hurry in, which is my sense of humor. And one of these sources that I used, it's a kind of a blog, but kind of like a history, you know, type thing. 

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00:04:30

They really go in depth with, with different things. And somebody, somebody commented on it and said, I know what I'm naming my next cat Currington. I mean, so yes, we are recovering the Parrington family massacre in 1806. So let's get into it. Some events in 1806 that were going on January 8th, Lewis and Clark find the skeleton of a 105 foot blue whale in Oregon, March 29th. Construction is authorized for the national road. 

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00:05:12

And that is the first United States federal highway. Interesting May 30th future president Andrew Jackson fights his second dual killing an attorney whose name was Charles Dickinson who had accused Jackson's wife of bigamy. And a fun fact about that duel. Was it in Weehawken? No. Jackson has everything is legal in New Jersey. Everything Jay Jackson for the rest of his life had a bullet lodged close to his heart. 

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00:05:52

So July 15th, the pike expedition near St. Louis, Missouri, United States, army Lieutenant Zebulon pike. I leads an 

1  

00:06:03

Expedition. Even my next guy. 

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00:06:08

He leads an expedition from Fort Bellefontaine to explore the west November 15th. So last one was July. This is now November, right during his second exploratory expedition, Lieutenant Zebulon pike sees a distant mountain peak while near the Colorado foothills of the Rocky mountains. And that is why it is named Pike's peak. If you've ever heard of Pikes peak in Colorado, 

1  

00:06:39

Y I may or may not know someone who may or may not have removed some rocks from Pike's peak and brought them to Alabama. It, you may or may not be illegal to do so. That is all I have to say on that matter. Allegedly, allegedly, 

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00:07:07

There wasn't a specific date for this one, but I had to put it in here in 1806. Noah Webster published the first American English dictionary. So Webster's dictionary. So it was just interesting. August of 1805, the parental and family moves from Bowden ham, Maine to Augusta to start a new chapter of their lives and July 9th, 1806, captain James Parrington, brutally murders, almost all of his family before taking his own life. 

1  

00:07:45

That is so sad. So we'll start with a murder suicide situation is, 

0  

00:07:54

And it could have not been, oh yes. Augusta Maine was first inhabited in 16, 28 by the Plymouth colony as a fur trading post, but due to the natives uprising against the settlers and the decline in trading in the area, the area was sold in 1661. And it actually remained unoccupied for 75 years, which is crazy during the French and Indian war, a block house, which I've seen these before in certain like movies and things like that. It's a small Fort is what it is, but it looks like, so the bottom is smaller than the top. 

0  

00:08:37

It's like, if you took a small footprint of a house and you took the base of it, like the first floor, right. And then you put a bigger house on top of it. That's what it looks like. Okay. It's very interesting. It's almost like 

1  

00:08:56

At the beach where you have, it makes me think of the houses on stilts, but the bottom of it is actually part of the house. 

0  

00:09:02

Yeah. And it's smaller in, so the sides of the house kind of hang off. Do you know what I mean? Like if you put a big box on top of a small box, that's kind of what it looks like. And it's named Fort Western and that actually Fort Western will come back in the story, but it was on the Eastern bank of the Kennebec river. And that was built in 1754. This is now the oldest wooden Fort in America still stands today. Interesting Fort Western was intended to be a supply Depot for Fort Halifax and it was to protect the region from French attack. 

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00:09:43

Benedict Arnold used Fort Western as a staging area during the American revolutionary war before they moved up river to the battle of Quebec where a man may or may not have caught a bullet in the neck and Quebec in summary. So the area was named Augusta in 1797. And the seat for the county was done in 1799. Main finally became a state in 1820, and Augusta became the Capitol in 1827. So technically our case while in America, it wasn't in a state. It wasn't a state yet. 

0  

00:10:22

Just part of the colony. Have you been to Maine? I have not. It's very farthest north. I've been is New York. I went to New York. Nope, Nope, 

1  

00:10:33

Nope, Nope, 

0  

00:10:34

Yes, Nope. Yes. Pennsylvania below, above 

1  

00:10:40

New. York's going to be higher than Pennsylvania. 

0  

00:10:43

I don't, I don't do math or maps. Maps. Yeah. 

1  

00:10:48

Geography, 

0  

00:10:50

Geography. 

1  

00:10:52

I've been to Maine. I went twice, actually two different summers on mission trips. 

0  

00:10:58

I've always heard. It's very pretty 

1  

00:10:59

It's it is very pretty. I went in the summertime, such went to Bangor. It's not banger. It's four. And they do 

0  

00:11:10

Listener. That's a in Canada kind of close to that edge. Hello? Canadian listeners and our neighbors to the north. Yes, 

1  

00:11:23

It is a very, very pretty site. I would like to go now as an adult. And also, I mean, I loved going there doing mission work and we did backyard bubble clubs and we stayed at Hudson college. It was very, very lovely little campus. It's a small college lovely little campus and all side note met my prom date in my senior prom date in Maine. There was another church group there from Cleveland, Tennessee who? Hi Adam, if you're listening, he's still my friend. We did not get married, but he got married to a lovely leather lady and they have three boys, three boys and a passel of animals farm. 

1  

00:12:08

And he's still a very wonderful friend actually texted me when we had tornadoes come through and checked on me like, Hey, they said your county, are you okay? Like he had 

0  

00:12:20

Try three doors down. 

1  

00:12:22

I was like, we're okay. But man, it was close. Anyway. Just a little sidebar there. But Maine is beautiful and I would love to get back. 

0  

00:12:31

I've always wanted to go up to that area. I've always wanted to go to Boston to, oh yeah. We talked Boston last. 

1  

00:12:40

I'm telling you, you had Backstreet boys. I have your kids 

0  

00:12:44

Get that. Mark Walberg is a felon. I just want to go ahead and put them. 

1  

00:12:48

That was not one of the new kids you need to show Face. Dani is the new kid. 

0  

00:12:57

I know where that Dani is it, but I'm just saying in relation to Boston while I 

1  

00:13:03

Just, because someone is a felon does not mean that they are can not be a good person. Pretty sure he 

0  

00:13:07

Killed someone. Hey, 

1  

00:13:09

You don't know. You don't know. You don't have the facts 

0  

00:13:15

How to find out there right now. 

1  

00:13:19

Just look 

0  

00:13:23

I'm saying it. I know the people change, but I'm also saying you can't just 

1  

00:13:27

Say it it's a feeling. I 

0  

00:13:29

Mean, people don't remember the, 

1  

00:13:32

Not really that bad. I'm just saying, I'm just saying it. 

0  

00:13:40

I'm just saying. But anyway, I'm aware that they are in Boston 

1  

00:13:46

Acadia. National park in Maine is beautiful. Now I'm not saying people, I'm not saying to go out and commit a felony. I'm not saying that. I'm just saying she came at me really hard about my boys and I love the boys in the band. I may have gone with my two other two besties who love it. You guys like 

0  

00:14:04

That he was charged with attempted murder. 

1  

00:14:07

Okay. Attempted, and you don't know all the details of the case. It could be that it was accidental, but it still, he pled guilty 

0  

00:14:14

To assault and was sentenced to two years 

1  

00:14:17

Through hands first. You don't know all the details. I'm pretty sure it was because of the way things are listed. You don't know if you don't know the case. Don't start speaking to it. I have friends who are in. 

0  

00:14:30

You might, it's a racially motivated hate crime. I don't look. I 

1  

00:14:35

Don't know all the details. You don't know. 

0  

00:14:40

I'm 

1  

00:14:40

Just saying you going to drag this stuff up 

0  

00:14:42

Because I'm saying it was, it didn't happen in 1988. All I'm saying is in a loft in 1991. Okay. So then 

1  

00:14:51

Shut just, 

0  

00:14:53

He was only 16 years old. I'm just saying you look there's some, it was just, it was a fight. It was a fact that I remembered that. I forgot that I remembered, but I say that to say, because I was listening to something the other day and they were talking about how like, people have done certain things and like how they're just kind of forgotten and swept under the rug or something. And somebody goes, did she know that mark Walberg was charged with attempted murder? And I was like, I'm sorry to boy. I mean, he's beautiful. And he has said that he's not the same person, everything. 

0  

00:15:34

However, still there's a guy on Tik TOK who does a fantastic mark Walberg impression. And he always makes the joke. And he always includes Donny in his jokes because he's cause you know, mark Walberg is like a hyped all the time. Like he's like, he's ready to fight somebody. And he's like, why would you talk about that? Huh? Why would you talk to me like that? He's like, Donny, think we're going to have teach sky lesson. Let's go. I want to have to remember his tech talk. But anyway, 

1  

00:16:03

Bringing that up so you can, that people are talking about love everybody because everybody 

0  

00:16:07

He's a felon podcast. I'm 

1  

00:16:10

Just saying you might be sad. 

0  

00:16:12

You'll be fine. You'll be fine. I mean, Dan, just think about this. Think about a little brother. We'll think about the 

1  

00:16:20

He's a felon. You know what I mean? Sometimes things happen. Number three, kid, 

0  

00:16:25

You know me, you know, that's where my mind is going to go. Hey, 

1  

00:16:30

I feel judgment coming from you. And it 

0  

00:16:33

Just makes me sad. Did I not say to you cleanse your aura point out to you that one of them has an HGTV show? Yes. And I love it. So there you go. I do like it and it's so funny because it, it, it is like he's he is, he is one of the accent and what he does does not match. 

1  

00:17:00

I got to tell y'all growing up Jordan night. Oh my goodness. When he hit those Hondas, he was my very favorite. Let me tell you I'm a Hearst. He can hit those high notes and I love it. I'm telling you, but he was my favorite. And John was like his older brother and I always thought he was so cool and so sweet. I love what he does. I think it's perfect. I love it. 

0  

00:17:24

It's just so funny because we have all these like HGTV shows, like we've talked about them before, like hometown and fixer-upper I love hometown, but it's so well, I like, I like Ben and Aaron better. Sorry. I can differently. I like in differently. I think that an Aaron are more like us. I think that's true. I think when I also stood back and realized that Joanna Gaines just rips down all the walls and makes everything white and that's not really revolutionary, I think was when I went, then I found Ben and Aaron show and I was like, oh, there's more, more color. 

0  

00:18:17

They don't just tear all the walls down there. And they actually they're like, we're going to build a wall here. And it's like, I'm sorry. You're but anyways, all that to say, this is case bound murder. So let's get back to it. You can't be fired. I'm sorry. I didn't mean to, it's just, you know how my mind works? You say one thing and then I'm like, why? You know, my brain like runs 20 steps ahead of like your mouth. So you say new kids immediately. I think Walberg, I think mark Walberg and then we're talking about murders or like clearly I do know you're letting you see their mom died recently was very sad. 

0  

00:19:03

Very sad, very sad. I mean, they seem like really super nice guys. It was just one of those things that I was like, once somebody said that the other day, I was like, sorry, what did happen? I'm sorry. Anyways. I was not, I was not even thought about being alive at that point. It's fine. This case back on track to just depress Leah more, this is a super hard case to find information on. There is an account of the crime that is called in all caps with an exclamation point, horrid murder, horrid, horrid, but as far as anything else, it was super fun, super hard to find any additional information. 

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00:19:57

The family is also listed in various sources as parental with one R and per inten with two RS. So kind of like the Durham, Durham, Durham thing, you know, Durham, Durham, all those thing. So two of the sources I named at the top are podcasts. And I don't like, I did not listen to them. I will say that I did not listen to them. However, both of them have websites that they can be flooded, not, not so much that they type out exact word for word. 

0  

00:20:38

It's kind of like a news article kind of that they put on there. So I did use those. They have amazing notes to read through on their websites. So once you're done with this episode, please, please, please. You know, if you want more information, go listen to them. And those are the podcast murder she told, which is I think a really good name. 

1  

00:21:07

Yeah. He loved murder wrote. 

0  

00:21:11

Sure. But it's murder. She told. And that episode isn't very long again, I didn't listen to it, but I think it was only like 27 minutes. It was, it was pretty 

1  

00:21:20

Digest. 

0  

00:21:22

And then the other one is called strange new England and strange new England had. I mean, their information that they put on their website was very, very informative and very 

1  

00:21:33

Helpful. There's a lot of mean, 

0  

00:21:35

But those were the only two places I saw anyone cover. 

1  

00:21:40

Well, what I was going to say though, strange new England, it makes sense that there'll be a podcast just for new England because that's where it's happened. So yeah, there's a lot, so much history there. I would love to just like go to new England and just say 

0  

00:21:55

Maybe when we do our live shows, when we become super popular and we do live shows, we could just do, we could take the, what is it, the Patriot trail. And we'll just go up the Patriot trail and just do shows long way. It's fine. And I'll color. Tell everyone about our podcast guys. So we can do lectures or 

1  

00:22:17

Maybe I'll like take art classes. And so I'll like, you know, draw some of the audience or something 

0  

00:22:23

So fancy not going to happen. So anyways, go listen to those podcasts. I heavily want to say that I did get information from them. I want it to be known that, you know, they are podcasts. I am aware they did their research and they have very, very, very good information and they deserve all the credit for that. I did not quote anything from them directly, but the information that I got is from there. So I just want to make that easy Lee clear, go support them if you haven't already. Or if you don't. So captain James scales Parrington was born and in Bowden him Maine in 1760 James, his father was from Cape Cod and his mother from north Yarmouth at a young age Yarmouth at a young age, Burrington married Elizabeth, Betsy, Clifford, a lot of women named Elizabeth back then. 

0  

00:23:26

Yeah. A lot of it cause we had Elizabeth fails and then we had Elizabeth Schuyler. I mean, it's just anyways. Well, it's a very 

1  

00:23:34

Regal name. It's in the Bible. And I mean, if they all 

0  

00:23:37

Somehow went by Betsy at some way, 

1  

00:23:40

But it's also was you had Elizabeth the first, right? 

0  

00:23:43

I mean just to put a super common name back then silicone the name true. So anyways, her name was Elizabeth Betsy. Clifford the couple came into a very large inheritance when James his father died. I mean, I hate to be done, but yet for money don't go well, James was a farmer and well-known for being a hard worker as well as frugal. It was for these reasons that the towns militia decided to give James the title of captain and not because he was a good captain because he had the money money. Oh, well he was very, he was a very hard worker and he was very well-known in the area. And so it wasn't so much the money that he had. 

0  

00:24:25

It was just, he had been in that town, his entire life. And also, you know, it was very well known. And so I think that part had more to do with it then than money just base because it also said he was very frugal. Like he didn't spend a lot. So the family was very prosperous and Bowden him and many people said that captain Perini Eaton's mood was very effected by the finances in their home. It's for this reason that it's extremely shocking that the family decided to move. James bought a hundred acres of land in Augusta Maine. 

0  

00:25:06

The land had not been kept for quite some time. And James went to Augusta a few months ahead of his family in order to start clearing the land by hand that's hard work. He built a small shelter for himself on the land and got to work. It took. So from when he got it, he, he went back and forth from Bowden him to Augusta, you know, to see his family. He built very small place for him there, but it took him everything that I've seen. It took him two full years to build them a home and to clear just six acres of land. 

0  

00:25:46

How many kids are we talking? Just wait. So the Ballard's owned the land right next to the <em></em> and Martha Ballard, the matriarch of the family was a midwife. And we will talk more about her later in the story captain Parrington finally moved his wife and eight children from Bowden him Maine to Augusta in August of 1805. Again, too many children. Yes. The children were poly 19, James 17, Martha 15, Benjamin 12, Anna 10, Nathaniel eight, Nathan six and Louisa 18 months when they moved there. 

0  

00:26:40

I liked the name typically at the time of their death. So the family moved into the farm house at, I think it's Belgrade road by all accounts. The Parrington seemed to be thriving. Neighbors described James as quote, an independent farmer with a handsome estate of steady correct and industrious habits of good character and fair reputation and strongly attached to his family. But that all sounds great. It was too good to last for the spring to the summer of 1806, had a bit of a drought and farmers in the area were very concerned for their crops. 

0  

00:27:23

I know a lot of people don't live on or near farms and, and it's some people really aren't aware how dangerous even a small drought can be to farmers. You know, you just have to think of it in a lot of different ways. Yeah, it's it it's dangerous because you don't have water. So you don't have crops. Summer's the time where, you know, really need to harvest things. You really need things to grow. You also, at this time are very reliant on livestock. They don't have water, they're going to die. So it's just, it's just a whole big circle. 

0  

00:28:03

That's really unfortunate. The Princetons did have cows and the lack of rain not only took away from the water supply, but also didn't allow for vegetation to grow on the farm for the cows to eat. And again, like I said, this is a type of summer that could ruin a farm for years. And this is their first year on the farm on this farm. Yes. A few locals mentioned that James had even talked about how his family was destitute and he wasn't sure how he could feed his family. So they were destitute, but he came in, they gave him to a lot of money. It was a combination of all these factors that led him to write a letter to his brother. 

0  

00:28:46

So Sunday, July 6th, 1806, Betsy took their oldest daughter with her Polly to a prayer meeting at the church. And James stayed home with the rest of the children. He was writing a letter when Martha who was the 15 year old, asked him what he was writing. James quickly tried to conceal the letter and asked Martha to bring him the butcher knife from the kitchen. He claimed it needed to be sharpened later, kind of a trigger warning, light trigger warning for this. Cause some people could find this a little triggering. So just, just FYI later, Martha saw her father standing in front of the mirror, moving his left hand over his throat with the knife. 

0  

00:29:29

And when Martha asked again what her father was doing, he said nothing and laid the knife down on the table. Martha will snitch immediately told her mom what happened as soon as she got home. Well, that's disturbing. I have feelings. Betsy found the letter, her husband had been writing and the letter said, dear brother, these lot, keep in mind guys. A lot of people did not write very well back in these days. It is not that I am pronounced that I'm saying we're just incorrectly. It's that? This is how it's written. Trust me. It's hurting me. 

0  

00:30:10

Dear brother, these lines is to let you know that I am going on a long journey and I would have you sell what I have and put it out to interest and put out my boys to trades or send them to see. I cannot see the distress of my family. God only knows my distress. I would have you put Nathaniel to uncle parental to a Tanner's trade. I want James to go to school until sufficient to attend in a store Benjamin to blacksmith's trade or to what you think best. 

0  

00:30:50

But to be sure to give them learning. If it takes all divide, what is left for? I am no more when confronted by his wife about the letter, you know, the implication in the letter that he was going to end his life. You know, obviously she was very distraught. James tried to console Betsy and told her that he didn't have any intention to end his life. But instead he just had a premonition that he was going to die. So he wanted to put his affairs in order. So didn't help. 

0  

00:31:31

So we're going to go back to Martha Ballard that I mentioned before her diary is the only firsthand account of what occurred that night. Martha Moore Ballard was a midwife and healer born in Oxford, Massachusetts on February 9th, 1735. So she was about 25 years older at the time. You know, then James Burrington both her uncle and brother-in-law were physicians. And it is likely where her curiosity for the medical field came from. And that's the only kind of medicine a woman could practice. At the time she married, she married her husband in 1754 and they had nine children. 

0  

00:32:17

Do I need to even say it at this point? Yes. Way to no, no, no. They outnumber you. There could be a mutiny. They can overthrow you. I am just saying it's too many gain. They get together gang up with one another and they overthrow the government in the household. That's all I'm saying can happen. It's dangerous. Okay. You know more kids than you have hands. None. Okay. No more kids than you have hands. This is my philosophy, which is saying you need to have one, one coverage. Yes. Especially in when the kids start to out number you and your partner book, you don't know what could happen. 

0  

00:33:00

I'm just saying this is all she had that covered 

1  

00:33:02

Then. 

0  

00:33:08

So unfortunately though, three of the nine children died in a diptheria epidemic in 1769, Martha delivered around 816 babies in the 27 years that she documented in her diary, 816. Wow. This diet, I know this diary also has entries that discussed Martha using local plants and ingredients from local physicians to make medicines and administering them to patients. So she was kind of a bit of a pharmacist that, but she was a woman. 

0  

00:33:49

So obviously, and not yet. And that's why I said before, she was a healer. She sometimes was asked to observe autopsies and 85 of those instances were recorded in her diary in 1789. Martha testified in a very high profile case where a judge was accused of assaulting the wife of a minister. It was not uncommon for Martha to take testimonies from <em></em> on wed mothers that were later used in paternity suits, which paternity sues obviously, you know, debating the paternity of the father, you know, the child for the father. 

0  

00:34:34

And so on. Martha fun fact was also related to the famous Clara Barton, you know, Clara, Barton, us 

1  

00:34:48

Civil 

0  

00:34:48

War. There you go, hold on. 

1  

00:34:54

It's not coming, but I should know this. I'm very mad at myself. 

0  

00:34:57

Clara was known for her role in the American civil war. And she founded the American red cross. 

1  

00:35:03

Yes. Medical is some it's the civil war, but I, all I can think of is Florence Nightingale and it was wrong. It was like that. 

0  

00:35:12

So because we have international listeners, if you don't know, the American red cross is a nonprofit humanitarian organization. It provides disaster relief, emergency assistance and disaster preparedness education in the U S so anytime comes through, tornado comes through hurricane when there are pandemics, like we just had the American red cross is really kind of the first line of defense. Other than FEMA, 

1  

00:35:46

I'll say the tornado that did come through. I mean, like it came through my town, like, like Taylor said, like just a few doors down from my house. Like my road was blocked by a huge tree. That was one of the first trucks that we saw with American. 

0  

00:36:02

And so, yeah. And they actually do deal a lot with international affairs as well. Sometimes the American red cross will go to other countries to give vaccines and different things like that. So just 

1  

00:36:13

Provide relief somehow Medicus or 

0  

00:36:16

Whatever, our friend, Martha, her, she was related to Clara Bart. That's very cool. Yeah. It's a very interesting, the accounts we have from Martha's life are solely thanks to her diary that she kept the diary had more than 1400 pages that began with short entries about daily life, which included the weather. And towards the end, the entries were very long and descriptive. So it just kind of seems like the more she wrote, the more she liked to write, the more in depth, everything 

1  

00:36:49

Became probably she wasn't as active as she got older too. 

0  

00:36:53

She discussed scandals, local crimes and hard times that her family encountered one entry of note was when she found it appalling. She was appalled. Paul, all old that children and new England were allowed to choose their romantic partners. If the partner was in the same economic class, how dare you choose your significant other? 

1  

00:37:23

Does she think if they chose somebody who was not in the same economic class, 

0  

00:37:29

She was not having it. Her 

1  

00:37:30

Last will have to lay down on the chase. 

0  

00:37:34

She's a fainting couch. Her last entry was in 1812. And the last birth that she attended was April 26th, 1812. She died pretty soon. Soon after the diary was then passed down through a few generations until it was donated to the Maine state library in 1930 and 1997. That's the year 

1  

00:38:00

I graduated high school, I was 

0  

00:38:02

Six PBS made PBS, made a documentary film based on her diary called a midwife's tale. We have this diary to thank for the firsthand account of the events that happened the night of the Parrington family massacre. So a pamphlet was printed by Peter Eads on July 11th, 1806, which described the scene in detail. I'm going to read pieces, this pamphlet and your trigger warning on this. One's probably at a medium, the description's pretty long, and there are graphic details to it. 

0  

00:38:46

I'll let you know when the description is over. And I'll put in the show notes kind of like I did for the harp episode, kind of the timestamps for the beginning and end, just because it's a little longer in case you want to skip over it, you, you know, you have the opportunity to do so if you would like so, yeah. So we're going to get into it. And 3, 2, 1 quote at an early hour on Wednesday morning, last, the inhabitants of this town were alarmed with the dreadful information that captain James Parrington of this place in cold blood had murdered his wife, six children and himself, his oldest son with a slight wound escaped. 

0  

00:39:31

And his second daughter was found desperately wounded and probably supposed to dead by the father between the hours of two and three, a near neighbor. Mr. Dean Wyman was awakened by the lad who escaped with an incoherent account of the horrid scene from which he just fled he with a Mr. Ballard, another neighbor, which side note, Mr. Ballard. That's Martha Ballard, who we talked about the midwife. That's her believe it's her son. We'll get to it, but just kind of context, instantly repaired to the fatal spot. And here after have lighted a candle, a scene was presented, which beggars all description and the outer room lay prostrate on his face. 

0  

00:40:20

And weltering in his gore, the perpetrator of the dreadful deed, his throat cut in the most shocking manner and the bloody razor lying on a table by his side in an adjoining bedroom lay miss Parrington in her bed. Her head on, sorry, guys. I warned you her head almost severed from her body. Ooh, and near her on the floor daughter of about 10 years old, who probably hearing the cries of her mother ran to go check on her and which she slept. And she was murdered by her side and another, they say apartment, but it's like a room, right. Was found the two oldest and the youngest daughters, the first age, 19 dreadfully butchered, the second desperately wounded reclining her head on the body of sorry, guys, the 18 month old child and in a state of horror and almost total insensibility in the room with their father lay in bed with their throats. 

0  

00:41:26

Cut two youngest sons, the one eight, the other six, and in another room was found on the hearth. Most dreadfully mangled, the second son, age 12, he had fallen with his trousers under one arm, which she had attempted to escape on the breast work over the fireplace was the distinct impression of a bloody hand or the unhappy victim probably supported himself before he fell. The whole house seemed covered with blood and near the body of the murderer. Lay the deadly acts from the surviving daughter. We have no account of this transaction. Her dangerous situation prevents any communication and, but faint expectations are entertained for her recovery. 

0  

00:42:10

From the son aged 17, we learned the following that he was awakened by the piercing cries of his mother. And in voluntarily shrieking himself. He leaped from his bed and ran towards the door of his apartment. He was met by his father with an ax in his hand, the moon shone bright. His father then struck him, but being so near each other, the acts passed over one shoulder and one corner of it entered his back, making a slight wind. His father then struck him at one or struck at him once or twice and missed him at this moment. His younger brother who slept in the same bed with him, jumped from it and attempted to get out at the door to prevent this. 

0  

00:42:52

The father attacked him, which gave the eldest and opportunity to escape during the dreadful conflict. Not a word was uttered from the appearance of his wounds. Generally it not 

1  

00:43:03

A word was uttered. 

0  

00:43:06

It seems to have been the design, the design of Parrington to discover the heads from the bodies accepting the two youngest whose throat it supposedly were cut with a razor. The oldest daughter in second sign had several wounds, the probable consequence of their resistance. We have no evidence that leads us to satisfactory of the motives for this barbaric and unnatural deed. And that's the end of the description? 

1  

00:43:35

How sad 

0  

00:43:36

What's Erie is that he didn't say anything. Yeah. Like was he in a trance, 

1  

00:43:45

Petty, just steeled himself for it. And just, he was just, this has just got to get done because I know like I started taking a new medicine and I had to give myself a shot and I don't like the needle things. Like when I go to the doctor and I have to have a shot, like I don't love shots. I had to test having to get them to take my blood because God gave me the blood on the inside and that's where it should stay. And they had to keep the needle in there a really long time. I don't, I don't do well with it. It just makes me crazy. But having a shot doesn't really bother me that much. I don't love it, but I had to give myself a shot with this new medicine that I'm taking. 

1  

00:44:28

And like, when I had to do that, I had to take a breath and just do it. Like I had to just go there, get myself ready and do it. And I just had to not think about it and just do it. And so maybe, I mean, those are two variables. 

0  

00:44:45

Yeah. I have some theories, but yeah, it's, it's very eerie that he didn't say anything. Okay. So I know that description was really long, but it's kind of the main account that we have of the crime scene. The pamphlet goes on to include the information regarding the letter to James, his brother and how the family was on the border of becoming destitute. It also states that James ground, the acts before he went to bed that night, and when he retired to bed, he was reading his Bible. And the Bible was actually like grossly enough was still opened when the family was found and it was open to his EQL chapter nine, which said, according to this quote, he cried also into mine ears with a loud voice saying caused them that have charge over the city to draw near even every man with his destroyed weapon in hand. 

0  

00:45:39

Let, not your eyes spare. Neither have you pity, sleigh, utterly old and young, both maids and little children and women, but come not near any man upon whom is the mark, which is really creepy. Like I don't, I don't know. It's weird. 

1  

00:45:58

That's all flowery. And I don't really read that version. How about, 

0  

00:46:04

No, it was 1806. I don't think anybody does anymore. 

1  

00:46:07

Now we read a more, 

0  

00:46:11

I think that'll be helpful. 

1  

00:46:12

A more modern version. So it's <em></em> what is it? Chapter nine. Chapter nine. Okay. So it's the slaughter of the adulterers is what the heading is for that chapter verse. One says then the Lord thundered bring on the man appointed to punish the city, tell them to bring their weapons with them. Six men soon appeared from the upper gate that faces north, each carrying a deadly weapon. In his hand with them was a man dressed in linen who carried a writer's case at his side. They all went to the temple courtyard and step aside the bronze altar. 

1  

00:46:53

And there's a whole lot of description. And then down in verse five, it says, then I heard the Lord say to the other men, follow him through the city and kill everyone whose forehead is not marked show. No mercy have no pity, kill them. All old and young girls and women and little children, but do not touch anyone with the mark began right here at the temple. So they began killing the 70 liters. Ooh that's that's harsh man. 

0  

00:47:26

Which also though makes sense when he idolaters, but he also says show no mercy. Yeah, 

1  

00:47:37

Because he just, he just went at it and didn't split. He didn't say anything. So that does make it make a little more sense. Yeah. It is the NLT version in case you're wondering 

0  

00:47:46

It was very, it's very weird. I don't know. All right. So we'll go into the account of Martha Ballard that she wrote down in her diary from that night, Martha and her husband were woken at about three in the morning by two of their neighbors. Sating. The Parrington family were all dead except for 17 year old James Martha's son. Their daughter did die. Not at this time. They thought she was dead. So, so Martha's son, Jonathan went to the neighbor, went with the neighbors over to the Parrington home. When Jonathan returned from the Parrington, he described what he saw to his mother. 

0  

00:48:29

And she wrote it down in her diary. And it said, quote, the two went to the house where the horrid scene was perpetrated. My son went in and found a candle, which he lit and to his great surprise saw Parrington his wife and six children's corpses. Martha, he perceived had life remaining who was moved to his house. Surgical aid was immediately called and she remains alive. As of yet, my husband went and returned before sunrise. When after taking a little food, he and I went to the house where to behold, the most shocking scene that was even seen in this part of the world may an indefinitely good God grant that we may all take suitable. 

0  

00:49:15

Notice of this horrid deed learn wisdom there from the court says, were removed to his barn or they were washed and laid side by side, a horrid spectacle, which many hundred persons came to behold. It was there till near night. When son Jonathan conducted me to his house and gave me a refreshment. The coffins were brought in the courts is carried in a wagon and deposited in the Augusta meeting house. The end so much like with our case with lovey weeks and Elma sands, you'll spectacle it. 

0  

00:49:55

Hundreds of people just walking by checking no profits. Nobody will good. Not that I know. There's that? Not that I know of. Oh yeah. So the daughter who initially survived Martha, she was the 15 year old that saw her dad writing the letter. So she's the one who initially survived. She did receive medical attention, but she died a few days later leaving James only surviving member of the Parrington family that he had. Survivor's guilt. Yeah, the coroner summoned and a jury of inquest. 

0  

00:50:36

And the jury found that James quote, which captain Parrington not James, the son, just to be, be clear, quote of his malice, afterthought did kill and murder his wife and children. And as a felon did voluntarily kill and murder himself. Betsy Parrington and six of her children were buried together in an unmarked mass grave in the common bearing ground and Augusta and marked it just the area that it was in, it was a common burial area. And they actually passed the four that we originally discussed in the beginning. It was noted that that was one of the places that they had to pass in order to get to the burial ground. 

0  

00:51:18

So just interesting. Kind of know where the location kind of is. Yeah. So, but James Parrington captain James Parrington was not buried in a cemetery at all. 

1  

00:51:35

I was going to say, I hope that he was not put with them because 

0  

00:51:38

No, they decided to, depending on people's thoughts on the afterlife and you know, whether you, what happens with you and where you go, you know, or if you just become a ghost who knows life, he was buried in a hole on the other side of the road and neither side of the 

1  

00:52:00

Road from his family, like directly across. 

0  

00:52:02

Okay. Not directly across it, just as it was across from the cemetery. Okay. Not 

1  

00:52:08

On hallowed ground. Correct. 

0  

00:52:11

So he was buried in a hole on the side of the road with his only company being the ax and razor that he used in his crime. And that is the Parrington family massacre. Wow. Yeah. Yeah. So 

1  

00:52:31

I want to know what happened to the son that survived. 

0  

00:52:34

He is from everything that I saw because I tried to find more information. He didn't have any children that, that we do know. So he didn't go on to have any kids himself. 

1  

00:52:46

It's probably messed up. I mean, and I'm not saying that lightly. I mean like 

0  

00:52:52

He, he most likely what is speculated is that he left the area. 

1  

00:52:58

Yeah. 

0  

00:53:00

So, yeah. But a lot of people who have researched this story and have gone forward to try and find out what happened to James did find out that he did not have any children. He changed 

1  

00:53:12

His name. 

0  

00:53:14

I would mean cause 

1  

00:53:17

Parrington is not really a name that you forget is one 

0  

00:53:20

That is like, no comment. No, not at all. So, and I don't know, I have theories. You always have. I do. I mean, what are you, why do you think he did it? Because originally he wasn't going to, he wrote the letter, remember told his brother what he wanted to happen with his money. So what do you think? Like what's, what's your 

1  

00:53:44

Thought that here's my thought. Well, I mean, I was trying to think how to put it into words. He was going to take the coward's way out. Right. And not have to deal with the, 

0  

00:54:01

Which to be clear. We're not saying we're not, I know I'm making clear. We're not saying that ending your life as the coward's way out 

1  

00:54:11

To clear. 

0  

00:54:13

Correct. I just wanted to make sure that was 

1  

00:54:16

Yes. Yes. And that's, I'm sorry that that's not what I'm meaning is he, he didn't want to have to see the disappointment in his wife's face or eyes and voice. But since the cat got out of the bag, he was like, well, 

0  

00:54:34

Let's just take care of it 

1  

00:54:35

All. I mean, that's exactly what I think now. Well, she knows now, so, 

0  

00:54:39

And everybody said that his mood was directly related to how much money they had at the time in the old town that they lived in. So I don't know. I don't know if it was poor Information. I know I told you this one was hard. It 

1  

00:54:55

Was such a relative back on me. Want to surprise me with something? Oh, it 

0  

00:54:58

Was hard to find stuff on this one. I had to dig up a lot, but it, this is actually probably one of the longest cases that I researched. Cause I had to try and find stuff on it and this time 

1  

00:55:09

Researching this case. 

0  

00:55:13

So yeah, I agree. I mean, there is a case for saying mental health could very well be involved in this. I personally, 

1  

00:55:26

I think anytime a suicide is, is in the picture that it's mental health. Right? I think so. And I will say it is more difficult to, and it is the harder choice to stay than to decide to leave. I will say that because it is harder. I will. I mean, I will say that. I think that is very much true because it's hard. 

0  

00:55:49

It's hard. And like you said, I think there's a good, it's one of those things and the reason. So the reason that the point where I think everything could have changed had one and not to victim blame, not to say it is anyone's fault. I think the one point that all of it could have been different is if Martha never told her mom about the letter, because at that point he had only intended to end his own life. But I think that when he, when his wife found out, I think it, like you said, you let the cat out of the bag on what your plan was. 

0  

00:56:41

And it's like, all right, well, if I'm not going to take me, I'm going to take all of them. Do you know what I mean? Because then if you follow through with what you did, your wife now knows why you did it, 

1  

00:56:55

But also, I mean that he may have already decided to change his mind. You know, he may have already changed his mind before that. I don't know. 

0  

00:57:06

It's very, it's just very odd that in the beginning it was only going to be himself and then keep in mind, not even a day later, he changes his mind and 

1  

00:57:22

It's just sad to me. Oh way. Or you look at it that somebody thinks that the only answer 

0  

00:57:29

Exactly, that's 

1  

00:57:30

It so sad to me because there's always another answer and stuff, you know, Tom can get hard. And I mean, we're very well aware of that. And I have to say, I have been so incredibly blessed and incredibly lucky in my life that I have not had hard, hard, like black people have no, I mean, just like struggle as far as okay. Monetarily. I mean, not that I've, you know, had everything given to me and I've had all the latest and greatest, I'm just saying, I have not had to worry about, am I gonna have enough money to pay for power, pay for food, have gas in my car, have clothes to wear, let alone, you know, be able to go on a field trip or have not just the nicest, newest shoes. 

1  

00:58:24

That'll go just right with an outfit, but a pair of shoes that fit, you know, I've not had those worries. And I recognize that I am very blessed and you know, there are others who can't say that. I totally get that. And it's easy. So easy for me to say, it's, it's going to get better, you know, but it will, it has to, it will. And if I can help you, I will write. 

0  

00:58:54

And I mean then coming from the other side where, I mean, I have dealt with some very difficult things in my life, not to go into detail of any of them, but I have had very trying times that I've dealt with in my life and what you're saying, like, I understand both perspectives of things because I can see how you want to tell someone things are going to get better. Things are going to be good. But when you're in the middle of it, oh, it doesn't look. I mean, I mean, and I get it. I'm saying just from, because I'm a fixer, I want to fit. I mean, everybody that knows me, knows I want to fix everything. I want to make it better. 

0  

00:59:34

If I can hurt instead of you, I would much rather it, like, that's just how I am. But I know those times when you're sitting there and you think there's no end to this situation, there's no way I'm going to, you know, and yes, eventually, you know, you work your way through those hard times in your life. And unfortunately, some people don't don't I have, I can't say they don't have the support to carry them through those times, which is how some of these situations happen. 

1  

01:00:14

And I will say I've had problems, right? Mercy I've had problems. I'm just saying, it looks like his issue was monetarily. I have not been destitute in that sense in my life. I can't relate to that. Now. Other issues I have had a plenty, I mean, I have been left out. I've been through depression. I have been through, I mean, I got all, I've got the crazy pills. I got the happy pills, you know, crazy pills. 

0  

01:00:47

They're the calm down ones. 

1  

01:00:50

No, I don't know. My happy pills are my calm down pills. The crazy pills are just to keep me, you know, crazy kind of level to keep the crazy out or keep the crazy at a, at a constant level and not to get too much. I mean, I have problems. I'm just saying I can't relate to the monetarily again. Not saying that I'm rolling in the dough. Cause I'm not, my husband will definitely tell you that I'm not this Chet, but not say that I love so much, but I just, I don't. Yeah, I can't, I don't understand that mindset because I've not been there. 

0  

01:01:29

But anyway, you know, and I mean, I'm not, I can't say that. I I'll say it this way. I grew up in some areas where that is the case for a lot of people. Yes. My family, both sides of my family actually come from areas that, you know, it's, it's one of those areas that, you know, one area is really nice. The other area is really not like it's, it's one of those places that 

1  

01:02:06

Literally different sides of the track. Yes. 

0  

01:02:08

And, and, but just a door down, two doors down, you know, it's just, it's, it's where in a lot of my family lives in those kinds areas where you have areas that are super nice. And then you have the areas that a lot of people there are destitute. And I grew up in and around those areas in my life. And so, you know, it is hard. And my family went through a really hard time during the financial crisis of 2009. It was rough because my mom's a real estate agent. And I mean, real estate just like bottomed out and not to say anything negative about that time. 

0  

01:02:52

But that was the time when a lot of people were realizing, Hey, like not knowing what to do. And that was a big time for a lot of people to choose to end. There are a lot of bad things and it, and you know, so someone that we 

1  

01:03:13

Know I had to file for bankruptcy. Yes. 

0  

01:03:16

And, and it's yeah. And I mean, people you would never expect. And so I do think that there is a very strong case to say that, you know, a lot of people say, and I hate the term and please understand Lee. And I both, we are very well aware of our privilege of where we stand today. I mean, even though I have my own house, I mean, I do fully financially support myself and, you know, you know, we're very well aware of that privilege. But also I come from the side of, there was a time and point in my life. 

0  

01:03:57

I won't say when or anything that the power wasn't on for a little while, or, you know, just things like that. And at no fault of, anyone's just, you know, situations that happen. But you know, a lot of people say, oh, well, you know, money can't really buy you happiness. I understand the concept of that phrase. That's what I'll say. I understand the concept of the phrase of money can't buy happiness. However it can buy, it can fix a lot of problems. I mean, like it can, it, it's one of those things that 

1  

01:04:37

It does make, it does make, it does help with. I mean, it helps you with, 

0  

01:04:42

And a lot of people are very money insecure in the world that we live in. And it's very unfortunate. And you know, 

1  

01:04:50

One thing that it's misquoted, so often people say money is the root of all evil. That is not the verse. The verse is the love of money is the root of all evil. 

0  

01:05:03

And that makes 

1  

01:05:04

It totally, 

0  

01:05:05

We different, you know, cause people will say, well, you know, these celebrities have money and they're still depressed. Yeah. I mean, Monster's just not going to pull, right. Money is not going to fix your depression. I mean, money lets you sit in a super nice air, conditioned home with food in their refrigerator, 

1  

01:05:23

You sharing 

0  

01:05:24

It with. And that's that's I think where a lot of people confuse that term. Right. And, and you know, there's a lot of people, you know, you see it with different athletes and things like that, who they am guys. We are in Alabama. So our, you know, we obviously have the university of Alabama, I'm a little done to it, but 

1  

01:05:57

She doesn't go for the best team, 

0  

01:06:00

But a lot of teenagers are brought in to that college because they can play sport. And they're given a full ride scholarship. Yes they are. And 

1  

01:06:14

It, and they go on to play 

0  

01:06:15

In the NFL. And I think that is one of the most dangerous things you can do to campaign in their early twenties is say, absolutely, we're going to not only pay for you to go to college. We're going to give you a scholarship to go to college solely because you can play football because we do, we, we know there are a lot of people who end up going into sports that really can't read and write like they were pushed your candy. They were pushed through the education system because they could play sports or because, sorry, I'm not going to get on my soapbox for education. But a lot of times it is it's, I'm pushing them to the next grade to be someone else's problem. 

1  

01:06:57

I'm not going to say that doesn't happen because it does. It does. But, and there's some, some programs that you are exactly. Right. 

0  

01:07:04

And I think it's unfortunate when you have students who do go down that path and then they've only been playing football at Alabama or whoever for two years, and then they're drafted after they didn't finish college. Not to say there's anything wrong with finishing or not finishing college. College is 

1  

01:07:27

Given injury before you play one time. Right. Right. And that's why I have loved, you know, here recently the players that cheese to stay another year. Yeah. Finish their degree. Exactly, because that makes me so nervous, even more proud of them because it shows that they are valuing their education. 

0  

01:07:45

So what I think, the reason I say this and the reason that I say this is relating to money and relating to this case, and these issues is because you see these kids who came from an area who CA who still have family members that are in poverty, like below the poverty line role model for them. And you do, but you've been, you're barely in college, you're drafted in the NFL and the NFL goes, here's $10 million. Congratulations. And it's eight is flow through us, Gary. Yes, I do that. You know what I mean? And that's, that's why I think a lot of people go, oh, well, you see that and money can't buy happiness. 

0  

01:08:29

And it's like, no, that's not necessarily the case. Keep in mind, you're giving millions of dollars to a kid a year old to a kid to yes. And, and I think a really unfortunate, but good example of that is the Aaron Hernandez case. Aaron Hernandez did grow up. He's the one that played for the Patriots that allegedly murdered someone and ended up in jail and, you know, ended up ending his life while he was in, in jail. And, you know, it's, it's a very tragic case for a lot of reasons. 

0  

01:09:11

I don't, I don't condone what he did. I, I think it's, I think it's terrible. I think, I think it is, he, he is one of those players that didn't grow up with a lot. He was, you know, abused by his father. He, there were a lot of instances, his life. He also allegedly struggled with his sexuality at different times and had different things. He was assaulted at different times. And so, but you're taking someone who liked that played football was amazing at football made it. And that was his outlet. That was his outlet. And then you get a team that comes to you and says here's $20 million. 

0  

01:09:57

I mean, and you, you know, and in your mind, because you grew up and you never had the money. Now I have the money, you know, and I, it's just, and it's one of those things of like, you can't look at that and say, oh, well, you know, money's not going to buy you happiness cause no, it's not. But when you come from a money insecure lifestyle, it's very, you know, I think that that's a really good distraction. It is. It is. It's really good. I personally, in my opinion, I think that when that happens, I think just like if somebody wins the lottery, I think you need to immediately get a financial advisor. I mean you to, with Nazi in your life, same thing. 

0  

01:10:40

You know, I personally think that the best thing, you know, in those cases, and I know this is a tangent on the NFL, but I think that in those cases, especially with the NFL, you're drafting such young people, I think that it should be mandatory that when they are drafted, I think that money should go into a trust and you should have a financial advisor who can help you manage that money. They shouldn't have to, they, they should not have the financial manager for you. You should be able to that's I'm saying is you should be, but that should be a require 

1  

01:11:16

Math. I agree with that. I agree with 

0  

01:11:19

That. You know, here's, here's this, but we're going to require you to do this. Like, there are certain things you need to do before we hand you this $20 million. And 

1  

01:11:31

I don't know what all the requirements are. I don't either. 

0  

01:11:33

Yeah. I mean, but based off of some of the lives that we've seen of some of these people is there, 

1  

01:11:39

That's sort of, some of them are really good and you still let them had business majors and they have finished finished school and they have done things that you're like, okay. 

0  

01:11:50

Oh yeah. I mean, there's a good majority, 

1  

01:11:52

You know, on their mamas houses. Yes. That is what you want to see. 

0  

01:11:56

I mean, and it's, you know, and there are those cases when that does happen, but you also see a lot of players that go to the NFL and end up getting injured or being out after a few years. And then now they don't have money. Like it's gone, they spend it. It's gone. Yeah. They 

1  

01:12:13

Got nothing to fall back on and they didn't finish their 

0  

01:12:16

Thought. It was always going to be there. 

1  

01:12:17

Yeah. And they, they didn't finish college. They didn't, 

0  

01:12:21

You know, college is scam. I'll say it again, but go into a trade people place. 

1  

01:12:29

It's not a scam. You'll make a lot of money. There's nothing, there's nothing you need to go into trades because they're dying out the guy who set the cruise for college, which we need people who are college educated as well. But we need people who are, who, you know, we need welders. We need electricians. When he plumbers, we need all the things we need builders. We need. I mean, all the things we need, all these 

0  

01:12:53

People builder right now, my gosh at the price 

1  

01:12:56

Of things, as I'm going to Disney world now, instead of getting a new kitchen for my 20th, 

0  

01:13:01

You know, I, I just, I think a big basis of this case, I do think, as they said that his mood was directly related to how much money they had. 

1  

01:13:11

And sometimes as a man, then 

0  

01:13:13

That's a very masculine thing. Especially in this time, when it is your job to provide for your family, it is a hundred percent your job. And you were doing it before. Yeah. As well. I don't know why they moved. Yeah. It's very weird at why maybe they wanted more land. Maybe they thought they could be more successful somewhere else. 

1  

01:13:39

And he moved to start a new life at the beginning of it. And I remember thinking you were, you were on a roll, so I didn't want to interrupt. I actually stopped the interruption. You'd be amazed at the interruptions. I stopped because most of my, anyway, I wanted to ask, well, what was the old life like, why are they starting a new life? 

0  

01:14:00

It's never been said. And like us, like I said before, about this case, it's really hard to find information on it, unfortunately. But I mean, everything that I, that I read and everything that I saw from all the sources, they all kind of said the same thing is that he was starting, they were starting a new life in a new town, but there was never any indication that something negative happens. 

1  

01:14:24

Yeah. Because he has such good standing and they made him this, you know, but 

0  

01:14:29

People in this new town loved him. They loved him because keep in mind, he was there for two years before his entire family moved there. So it was set like a lot of people really like, it seemed that he was gaining the same reputation in this area that he had in the old town that he lived in. So I think it's a combination. I think maybe they put all the money into the farm may. I mean, they bought a hundred acres of land. That's a lot 

1  

01:14:57

Of thousand dollars, 

0  

01:15:00

5,000, but you know, that's maybe, maybe that was the thing. Maybe they decided to bet it all on the farm and this is what we're going to do, and this is going to be successful. And this is that the farm bet the farm, you know, it's just, it's unfortunate. I hate it. It's, it's really unfortunate. 

1  

01:15:21

And it just makes me sad. Anytime I see someone who just gives up and can't see, or doesn't have the, just, 

0  

01:15:32

You don't have the support to see 

1  

01:15:34

That you're so much more to this one thing. And yet you have people depending on you, but they love you too. And, and you're more than just this one thing. And, and they love you. And you're more than just with, 

0  

01:15:51

I think possibly that is why his plan changed. I think it was kind of well-known did that when his wife found the letter, she was distraught 

1  

01:16:10

And maybe she said, we love you. We would miss you. And so he was like, well, I'm not going to put him through. 

0  

01:16:16

I think that was what it was. Yeah. I think that's the w 

1  

01:16:22

So much, so I'm going to kill him. Yeah. 

0  

01:16:25

Which makes absolutely. 

1  

01:16:26

He was out of his mom. Right. 

0  

01:16:28

It's just, I think based off of the story and based off of everything, you know, and the letter, he, he, wasn't going to do that in the first place. And then for him to change his mind after, you know, Martha told her mom, I think that, I think it was a case of one, sorry, trigger warning for people who don't want to hear about chosen life ending. But when you originally thought you were going to take yourself out of this world, because the world would be better without you that's number one, then you find out that no people do want you there, but you still don't see a way out. 

0  

01:17:12

Right. Because everything is still on your shoulders. And so, 

1  

01:17:16

And you say, Hey, no, we want you here. I'll be so sad. We were like, well, I still need to be here. Cause it's going to be bad. Okay. So we'll just take, 

0  

01:17:24

Yeah. I think that is more of what happened. And I think when you get in a state like that, so eerie for them to say, he didn't say anything. Yeah. I just, he was just 

1  

01:17:38

In a trance. He was just in a 

0  

01:17:40

State. Yes. It's. I don't know. It's crazy. It's, it's a crazy case. And unfortunately not well known. So, you know, again, the two other podcasts that are out there that talk about it murder, she told and, and then Massachusetts, no new England, new England yet strange new England. Strange. So, you know, those podcasts also covered it. I have not listened to them. I'm going to, so yeah. You know, you want to hear more about it or hear other opinions, go listen to it. 

0  

01:18:20

That'd be, you know, support them to, they had great information and did a really great job on their research. That's nice. Dang. All right. Well follow us on Instagram at one nation under crime and on Twitter at O N U C pod. If you love our podcast, as much as we do and we know you do, and you should, should recommend us to everyone, everyone, everyone, literally, everyone, you see your waiter, maybe not your waiter. They don't like that very much. Probably not. And if you feel like it, leave us a five-star review on apple podcasts, we would greatly appreciate it a whole lot. 

0  

01:19:02

And please leave a comment if you do algorithms and such makes more sense. I don't know, weird things. We do have a Patrion. If you feel so inclined to help with the cost of making and hosting the show, you can donate to our Patrion, just go to Patrion and search for one nation under crime. If you have any questions, comments, stories, you want to email us, go for it. Our email address one nation under crime@gmail.com. We would love to read them and we will, of course, respond balsa, respond to your Instagram messages or anything like that. So please talk to us. We would love to hear from you. So again, dang, that's a long one. 

0  

01:19:44

It's long-winded not us. Never, never. So we appreciate you guys listening to this week's episode of one nation under crime. Thank you for joining us again for another week of crime. And you know, we'll see you here next week. Same time, different crime. And just remember that there isn't always Liberty and justice for all. We'll see you guys next week. Bye.